New Orleans Musicians Get Funky For Bernie Sanders

first_imgLoad remaining images Saturday, February 27th was unofficially Bernie Sanders Day in the city of New Orleans. The city held not one but two musical fundraisers in support of Senator Sanders’ presidential run, as well as the NOLA March for Bernie. The march ended at 30/90 on Frenchmen Street, where New Orleans Musicians for Bernie Sanders, a group including Brian Stoltz (The Funky Meters), Russell Batiste, Billy Iuso, Claude Bryant, Smokey Brown, Marc Stone, Joe Krown (Joe Krown Trio), Janna Slasaw, Laurie Lehner, Josh Paxton and more. The show was cover-free but donations were encouraged.The Maple Leaf Bar hosted Bern Fest, which brought Bernie supporters and music lovers to the beloved bar for one of their famous crawfish boils and an amazing lineup of musical acts including Sam Price Duo, Eric Benny Bloom & Gemini, Smoke ‘n Bones, and Pirate’s Choice. With bellies full of crawdads, New Orleanians supported Sanders by getting funky, of course.Musicians included Eric Benny Bloom (Lettuce, Pretty Lights, Sonic Bloom), Luke Quaranta (Toubab Krewe, Pirate’s Choice), Billy Franklin (Smoke N Bones, OTRA), Khris Royal (Khris Royal & Dark Matter), Sam Price (Honey Island Swamp Band, OTRA), Raja Kassis (Antibalas, Pirate’s Choice), Terrence Houston (George Porter Jr. & Runnin’ Pardners, Toubab Krewe), Max Moran (Donald Harrison Jr., Neospectric), Sam Dickey (Benyoro, Pirate’s Choice), Cliff Hines (Mike Dillon Band), Kyle Roussell, Thomas Glass, Doug Dietrich, Kyle Sharamitaro, Kyle Cripps, Amy Trail & more. Profits from the event went to the Bernie Sanders campaign.Check out the full gallery from Bern Fest below:last_img read more

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J&J asks US regulators to OK its one-shot COVID-19 vaccine

first_imgJohnson & Johnson has asked U.S. regulators to clear the world’s first single-dose COVID-19 vaccine, an easier-to-use option that could boost scarce supplies. Preliminary results from a massive study showed J&J’s vaccine was safe and offered strong protection against moderate to severe COVID-19. It didn’t appear quite as strong as two-dose competitors made by Pfizer and Moderna. Johnson & Johnson filed an application with the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday. An FDA panel will meet later this month and pore over the results. The company also is studying a two-dose version of its vaccine, but results won’t be available for several more months.last_img read more

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Council revamps internal structure, updates policies

first_imgOne of the lesser-known branches of student government, the Club Coordination Council (CCC) plays a large role in the task of making sure all of Notre Dame’s more than 200 clubs function on a daily basis.The CCC is comprised of club members elected by their peers to represent and oversee all of the recognized student clubs on campus, senior Jimmy McEntee, president of the CCC, said. The members are divided into six subdivisions that represent the diversity of clubs included: academic, athletic, special interest, performing arts, cultural and social service, he said.“The CCC has two major responsibilities, in my opinion. First, we allocate the funds given to us by the University — approximately $300,000 — to all of the undergraduate clubs,” McEntee said. “Second, we oversee the new club process at Notre Dame, voting on whether to approve prospective clubs throughout the academic year.”Club organization, club networking and club promoting are all also tasks for which the CCC offers assistance, senior Peter Hall, CCC vice president, said.“Additionally, we are responsible for running the appeal process if clubs have unexpected events that require funding,” McEntee said. “A limited amount of funds are set aside for the varying appeals throughout the year. Finally, we serve in a position that assists clubs whenever they need help.”An executive council of elected students from among the CCC’s membership heads the group, Hall said. According to the CCC website, the executive board consists of a president, vice president and controller.The council set out three main goals for the year, Hall said.“The first is transparency. Many people do not know that this council exists, let alone what it does, so by being transparent we will raise awareness of the CCC and help to provide insight into how we operate,” Hall said. “Secondly, we wanted to take a critical look at how we operate internally to see where we could improve.“Finally, we wanted to be more efficient. Past councils have been effective, but this year we want to be effective while being efficient.”McEntee said he believed the council should focus on community between the clubs and reevaluating the CCC’s own policies and procedures.“Due to the importance of cooperation among the divisions, one goal I’ve worked very hard on is to create an environment with a greater sense of community among the divisions and understanding for clubs outside an individual member’s division,” McEntee said. “An additional goal we set at the beginning of the year involved a reexamination of the procedures and policies for the CCC. We still have on file work papers from the early [1990s] from the CCC, and not much has changed since then.“A third goal we set at the beginning of the year involved making the process for clubs to thrive and exist as smooth and pain-free as possible.”McEntee said the third goal centered on making requirements for maintaining club status “as smooth and pain-free as possible.” New changes to the processes of the meetings have helped make this year’s CCC more successful than in past years, too, he said.“Part of the reason for this change can be explained by structural changes to CCC meetings, including an announcements section at the end of meetings, where divisions can promote and highlight various events occurring within their division in the near future,” McEntee said. “As well, between solid representation at Team ND and new themed CCC meetings, our representative have developed a strong rapport that will benefit our organization as a whole come allocation season.”The division of the membership into several small groups that focus on specific issues that could improve operation has been beneficial as well, Hall said.“We have been intentional with our agenda each week and moderated conversation efficiently to ensure all points are heard, but decisions get made in a very timely fashion,” Hall said.Reexaminations of policy and procedure have been informed by systems at other universities, McEntee said.“A few CCC members contacted other universities to understand the systems in place for dealing with undergraduate clubs, and we are looking at ways to include some of the positive aspects from those schools here at Notre Dame,” McEntee said. “We have also conducted a thorough review of the CCC bylaws and are in the process of changing a few small components.”New members have also played a big role in the council’s continued success, Hall said.“We have worked hard to develop great relationships with the individual clubs. Just this past week we voted in new members, but for the first time I can remember we had more applicants than spots open,” Hall said. “This indicates more people are aware of what we do and want to be a part of the CCC.”The new changes have also helped with making allocation of funds and other club processes less difficult for the clubs, McEntee said.“I’d like to highlight the work Paul Manrique, our advisor, has done that has had a significant positive change for students,” McEntee said. “We changed our previously mandatory club information nights to Club Leadership Forums (CLF), broken down on a division-by-division basis.“This allowed clubs to be introduced to the CCC members who represent their division, a change from past years. At the CLFs, clubs were provided with a folder containing all relevant information for their organization.”McEntee said the council constantly strives to improve the experience for everyone.“We are excited for the upcoming months at the CCC, and are always looking to improve the way we do things,” he said.Tags: CCC, Club Coordination Council, SAO, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Research shows solar plus storage now competitive with even more natural gas generation

first_imgResearch shows solar plus storage now competitive with even more natural gas generation FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:Solar plus storage has begun displacing new natural gas peaking units in Arizona, and 8minuteenergy Renewables CEO Tom Buttgenbach has said his firm can build solar plus storage at a lower price than gas peakers “anywhere in the country today.”A new study shows that solar plus storage (S+S) also outcompetes new “mid-merit” gas units in four of five grid service areas across the nation in a scenario where current rates of compensation for grid services hold steady over 30 years. S+S also costs less than these gas units in a number of other cases studied. The study was published by battery maker Fluence, a joint venture of Siemens and AES.Mid-merit or “load-following” units operate at an average capacity factor of about 15% to 45%, mid-way between peaker and “baseload” fossil-fired or nuclear units.The analysis used generation data from 435 U.S. natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) units to develop six “clusters” of NGCCs grouped partly by their capacity factor (i.e., percent utilization).The authors expect that “Even as the ITC phases out through 2023, reductions in S+S costs will improve the combined technologies’ economics over NGCC plants.” They cite a Wood Mackenzie Power and Renewables forecast of “6% and 8% annual reductions in all-in cost for front-of-the-meter solar PV and energy storage, respectively, between 2018 and 2022.”More: Solar+storage can outcompete “mid-merit” gas units, not just peakerslast_img read more

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2 Mob Associates Charged With Franklin Square Heist, Feds Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two reputed mobsters were indicted for allegedly robbing a Franklin Square jewelry store and trying to rob two other jewelry stores in the same community six years ago, federal authorities said Wednesday.Darren Elliot, 30, and Matthew “Mack” Hattley, 26, both of Queens, were arrested on robbery, attempted robbery and firearms offenses, among other charges, at Brooklyn federal court. They were among seven Bonanno crime family members and associates rounded up, including the late mob boss John Gotti’s grandson.“This office and its partners will continue to vigilantly pursue such organized violence and stop it in its tracks,” said Bridget Rohde, acting U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, who credited Nassau County police for their help in the investigation.Prosecutors said Elliot and Hattley stole about $250,000 in merchandise when they robbed one jewelry store at gunpoint and tied up the store owner—and tried to commit two other Frankin Square jewelry store robberies between Aug. 17, 2011 and May 5, 2012.Others charged in the pair of indictments include the Teflon Don’s 23-year-old grandson, John J. Gotti, 82-year-old Vincent Asaro, 22-year-old Michael Guidici, 26-year-old Matthew “Fat Matt” Rullan and 37-year-old Christopher “Bald Chris” Boothby. All are from Queens.Asaro, a former captain in the Bonanno family who was recently acquitted of charges that he plotted the Lufthansa heist, allegedly ordered an associate to set fire to a vehicle whose driver cut him off in 2012, authorities said. The associate, Gotti and Rullan torched the vehicle and fled police who witnessed the arson, according to investigators.Two weeks later, Gotti, Rullan, and Guidici allegedly robbed a bank of $5,491 after Guidici passed a note to a teller that stated in part, “I have a bomb,” prosecutors said. And in 2014, Boothby, Hattley and another Bonanno associate allegedly stole more than $50,000 in cash and hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of jewelry during a home invasion during which a woman was tied up, authorities said.All of the suspects face up to 20 years in prison, if convicted.last_img read more

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Slow off the mark

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UK digital bank serves clients shunned by big lenders

first_imgAmong Britain’s digital app-based banks that are attracting moneyed urban millennials is Monese, which also courts customers neglected by the country’s established lenders.In early 2000, Estonia-born entrepreneur Norris Koppel arrived in Britain and spotted a major gap in UK banking for newly-arrived foreigners who had trouble opening traditional accounts.Koppel was snubbed by banks owing to a lack of address documents and no credit history — and vowed to help those in a similar predicament.In the nation’s booming financial technology or fintech sector, mobile phone app-based “neo-banks” such as Revolut, Monzo and Starling have established themselves as plucky upstarts. The company describes itself as an electronic money institution that provides banking facilities — but it does not currently offer credit.”Monese was born from my own very personal frustration,” Koppel explained.”When I moved to the country I couldn’t open a simple account and I thought maybe that is something that can be done.”Monese is built for people who are moving to a different country, starting a new life, finding a better job, retiring, going for studies, or getting married somewhere else,” he added.In Britain, around 80 percent of Monese customers are foreigners whose salary goes directly into their account.Groups like Monese that only operate online carry out checks to verify the identity of new applicants to help fight money laundering.The app aims to compete with Revolut and Monzo, which have eight million and three million customers respectively in a fiercely competitive market.Monese expects to turn a profit by 2021.’Uber of banking?’Monese, which has a global workforce of roughly 400 people, describes itself as the “Uber of banking”, in reference to the popular ride-hailing app.”It’s a good comparison,” Koppel said, noting that it was used by a lot of gig-economy workers at Uber and takeaway delivery service Deliveroo.Britain’s traditional banking sector, which is still reeling from the 2008 global financial crisis and a string of product mis-selling scandals, retains a strong grip on personal banking, experts say.Warwick University’s Andreas Kokkinis, who specializes in corporate law and financial regulation, told AFP that fintech was gaining a foothold however.”The six biggest UK banks have 87 percent of the market share for current accounts so the remaining 13 percent is split amongst smaller conventional banks and building societies, and challenger banks,” he said.”In that sense large universal banks — HSBC, Barclays, Lloyds Banking Group, Royal Bank of Scotland Group and Santander UK — retain their dominance over UK retail banking market. “However, challenger banks, which operate exclusively online and thus offer cheaper services, are popular amongst customers below the age of 37.”Kokkinis added that, if current trends persist, “the market share of challenger banks will grow significantly in the near future,” which could lead to takeovers.”This does not necessarily mean that large banks will lose their dominant position in retail banking markets.”What is more likely to happen is that large banks will acquire successful challenger banks.”Monese is now in fundraising talks that could give it coveted unicorn status — meaning that the business would be valued at more than 1.0 billion British pounds (US$1.3 billion, 1.2 billion euros).The company is seeking 100 million pounds in additional funds from new and existing shareholders, which include US online payments specialist Paypal and British Airways parent group IAG.Topics : Koppel’s lender Monese joined them, expanding to 31 nations in Europe with two million customers in only five years of operation.Riding the wave”Investor trust in Fintechs and the amount of investment being poured into neo-banks is actually very significant; it hasn’t really slowed down. 2019 was definitely a peak point so let’s see how 2020 goes,” Koppel told AFP.”It’s very clear that banking is going through fundamental changes .. and there are a group of neo-banks including Monese who are on top of that wave.”last_img read more

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Wednesday people roundup

first_imgSociété Générale Securities Services – Jason Nabi has been appointedto the newly created position of head of financial institutions and brokers (FIB) for the UK. Reporting to Guillaume Heraud, global head of business development for financial institutions and brokers, he will be responsible for leading the business development strategy for FIB and its position across this client segment in the UK. He was previously responsible for the strategic business development of Markit’s asset servicing business.Allenbridge – Odi Lahav, chief executive, is totake over the company’s management from Karen Shackleton, currently managing director. Shackleton will, however, continue to handle her own client portfolio.Conning Asset Management – Ben Hamilton has been appointed portfolio manager in London. Hamilton, who will report to Russell Büsst, CAM’s European CIO, will assist senior portfolio managers managing fixed income portfolios for the European client base, and developing CAM’s global bond offering. Hamilton joins from Premier Asset Management, where he was assistant investment manager and research analyst for fixed income and multi-asset funds.GLG Partners – Simon Price has been appointed to the financials team. He will assume the position of asset manager, contributing to global, European and financials long/short strategies and working alongside the existing financials team of David Sanders and Stephen Holliday, with particular focus on stock-picking opportunities in the US and Japanese financials sectors. He joins from Occitan, where he was partner and global sector head for financials and macro analysis. Loyalis, State Street Global Advisors, Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change, Société Générale Securities Services, Allenbridge, Conning Asset Management, GLG Partners Loyalis – Aad van der Klugt is to leave as a board member at Loyalis, the APG subsidiary for additional pension products. His departure follows the slimming down of the company, as a result of a changing life insurance market, as well as the transfer to APG of the Loyalis subsidiary for tailor-made administration (LMA). Van der Klugt’s responsibilities will be assumed by Peter van Wageningen, chairman of the board, and financial director Wim Vliex. State Street Global Advisors – Mark Fortier has been appointed managing director, head of global defined contribution research and product development. Fortier, most recently head of product and partner strategy at Alliance Bernstein, will be responsible for developing products that anticipate plan sponsor needs, working closely with the investment teams across SSGA to bring new DC products to market globally. He will be based in Boston, reporting to Fredrik Axsater, managing director and global head of defined contribution at SSGA.Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change – Peter Damgaard Jensen has been appointed to the board of the IIGCC. Jensen is managing director and chief executive at PKA, and was also chairman of the Danish Insurance Association from 2009 to 2013.last_img read more

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DMCI vows to pay owners of ‘quake-hit’ condo units

first_imgCommunications secretary Martin Andanar said the settlement will helpthe owners of the unit in their transfer of residence and recovery from theunfortunate event. Manila – Malacañang welcomed thedecision of DMCI President and Chief Executive Officer Isidro Consunji tocompensate the homeowners of the Ecoland 4000 condominium in Davao City, whichwas damaged by a 6.5-magnitude earthquake on October last year. Duterte lambasted Consunji for being “arrogant” over DMCI Holdings’alleged refusal to pay back Ecoland homeowners.    PHOTO COURTESY OF ABS-CBN NEWS “All businesses must be sensitive to and have the interests and needsof their clients at heart and to be compliant to the standards and relevantlegislations,” he added. “Businesses and firms should not wait to be called out by President RodrigoDuterte as having certain issues that are burdening their clients,” Andanar added. He also threatened to deny mining and building permits for Consunji,who in response, said DMCI Holdings will now compensate the owners of units inthe Ecoland 4000 condominium of 150 percent of what they paid for their units./PNlast_img read more

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Pirates Crossbones Boys And Girls Relays Results

first_imgDiscus pair of Cody Bauer and Cain6th place finishersShot Put pair of Bauer and Jesse Hunter4×200 Relay – Dallas Crank, Connor Deaton, Ares Merritt, ImelThe Lady Pirates Track and Field Team opened their outdoor season at home during the Crossbones Relays Saturday. Columbus North, East Central, Franklin County, Madison and Milan all competed in the non-scored relay event.2017 Greensburg Girls Crossbones ResultsThe Greensburg Girls had outstanding performances with 5 championships, 5 runner-up championships, as well as a handful of career PRs.The meet began with dominating performances from the throwing duo of Lily Grimes and Erin Browning. The ladies threw great marks in their events especially Grimes’ new discus Personal Record of 101′. Erica Fixmer also performed at her best with a 4’6 jump and freshman Koregan Kidd significantly improved with a 7′ foot pole vault clearance. Kidd is the 6th best vaulter in school history. The girls 4 x 800 team also improved greatly by dropping 13 seconds marking the group the 7th fastest team in school history.All the Lady Pirates did an outstanding job in their events and were highly competitive. It was a great outdoor opener for 2017. The Greensburg Boys Track and Field team opened the season hosting the Crossbones Relays. A beautiful day gave way to solid performances from the squad including two first place finishes. No team scoring was held in this meet.2017 Greensburg Crossbones Relay Carnival“The team stepped up and competed well and were a pure joy to watch today. I watched guys step in and fill big roles today, including an outstanding relay leg from Devin Imel. Our young guys got a taste of high school competition and our veterans showed that hard work pays off in a big way (boys 4×800 squad). We will get tested twice this next week as we travel to South Dearborn to face the hosts Knights and Jennings County and on Friday when we travel to Decatur Central and meet teams like DC, Warren Central, Greenfield-Central and Brownsburg.”   Pirates Coach Mike Myers.1st Place finishers4×800 Squad of Reid McClintic, Kevin Johnson, Louis Moore and Jared Hasselbring in 8:46.4 (great legs by all the guys, Jared ran a pure guts last 200 to secure the win)4×400 Squad of Jadrian Woods, Louis Moore, Vincent Pavy and Devin Imel in 3:50.6 (everyone ran solid, Moore put us in the lead and Imel ran the best race of his high school career!)2nd place finishersLong Jump pair of Daimon Austin and Zach PokrzywinskiHigh Jump pair of Luke Lozier and PokrzywinskiDistance Medley Relay – Johnson, Austin, McClintic, Hasselbring3rd place finishersDiscus pair of Landen Deikhoff and Tanner YontsShot Put pair of Dylan Cain and YontsPole Vault pair of Charlie Pumphrey and Devin HannaSprint Medley Relay – Woods, Pavy, Pokrzywinski, Austin4th place finishers4×100 Relay – Woods, Pavy, Lozier, Pokrzywinski4×200 Relay – Woods, Shawn Parlow, Lozier, Pavy,Throwers 4×100 Relay – Bauer, Deikhoff, Yonts, Cain5th place finishers The girls will compete again Tuesday at South Dearborn against the Knights and Jennings County.Crossbones Relay ChampionsShot Put      65’7        Lily Grimes (38’8.5) & Erin Browning (26’10.5)Discus         205’5      Erin Browning (104’5) & Lily Grimes (*101′)High Jump   9’10       Arie Hampton (5’4) & Erika Fixmer (*4’6)4 x 800      *10:36.5   Cathy Newhart, Morgan Winkler, Julia Ankney, Cami JonesDMR            14:21.1  Cathy Newhart, Charlotte Anderson, Julia Ankney, Cami JonesRunner-Up ChampionsLong Jump       28′        Rylie Smith (14’2.25) & Jaylin Hampton (13’9.75)Pole Vault         15′        Ellie Kramer (8′) & Koregan Kidd (*7′)Throwers 4×1   1:05.9   Emily Lowe, Lily Grimes, Kailee Kidd, Erin BrowningSMR                 2:02.2   Mary West, Jaylin Hampton, Ashlynn Meyer, Julia Ankney4 x 400             4:37.1   Cami Jones, Rylie Smith, Ashlynn Meyer, Julia Ankney3rd Place4 x 100          53.6     Rylie Smith, Mary West, Jaylin Hampton, Ashlynn Meyer5th PlaceShot Put        50’6     Kailee Kidd (26′) & Emily Lowe (24’6)Discus           144′     Kailee Kidd (77’8) & Emily Lowe (66’4)Long Jump    25’6     Montana Whitaker (12’10) & Erika Fixmer (12’8)6th PlaceSMR              2:18.3  Koregan Kidd, Allison Ralston, Montana Whitaker, Reagan WhiteCourtesy of Pirates Coach Katina Tekulve.last_img read more

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