Evening with Champions

first_img An Evening with Champions Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Get a leg up All at once Emily Hughes ’11 dips low and aims high. Ice blue An expansive shot of the Bright Hockey Center displays the color, whirlwind, and fun of the night’s event. There is a light Linda Yao ’10, wearing her winter coat, operates the spotlight for skaters. Hey, it’s an ice rink after all! Sisters in arms Dazzling bodices and frilly dresses are just a few pleasures of skating. Here, members of Team Excel Junior, which features skaters from 18 New England regions, manage to be both identically dressed and distinctive. Shadow dancing Paul Wylie ’91 and 1976 Olympic medalist Dorothy Hamill move under the spotlight during the 40th anniversary of the Jimmy Fund benefit “An Evening with Champions,” sponsored by Harvard. With her spotlight purring like an old projector, Linda Yao ’10 used a steady hand to follow the cast of famed figure skaters as they shaved graceful ribbons into the ice during “An Evening with Champions.” “La Vie en Rose,” sung by Louis Armstrong, played over the loudspeakers, and a kaleidoscope of light bathed the ice.Over 40 years, the skating event has raised $2.4 million for the Jimmy Fund of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Brett Michael Giblin ’11, who co-chaired the event, said, “I truly believe that the reason this weekend was such a rousing success, from the incredible skating to the nearly perfect execution, was due to the fact that our volunteers were able to keep the objective that they were working toward — helping children with cancer — in the forefront of their minds.”The event struck a personal chord with 2006 Olympics skater Emily Hughes ’11, who first visited Harvard to participate in the event in 2006 to pay tribute to her mother, a cancer survivor. Hughes said, “I’m happy and excited that I can do this every year, and that it can go to a worthy cause. Cancer research has a more personal feel for me.” A shoulder to drape on Kimberly Navarro rides the back of partner Brent Bommentre. last_img read more

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Expert emphasizes interfaith dialogue as a tool to promote peace

first_imgMiroslav Volf, the Henry B. Wright Professor of Systematic Theology at Yale University, delivered a keynote address for the Catholic Social Tradition Conference on Monday in McKenna Hall Auditorium. In the address, he emphasized the importance of interfaith dialogue in achieving peace and happiness in an increasingly global world.“World religions have an important contribution to make as repositories of significant visions of human flourishing, significant visions of the good life,” he said.“If we don’t find ways to live, plural that we are, in peace within the common political space under a common political roof, our lives — all of our lives — are going to be worse for it.”During the talk, which is part of a three-day conference celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document “Gaudium et spes,” Volf said that religious exclusivism — which he explained as a religion’s belief in its exclusive access to the ultimate truth — initially seems to present an obstacle to the peaceful coexistence of different religions.He said the problem, particularly, is that all world religions are fundamentally exclusive to varying degrees.“There is no non-exclusivist position,” he said. “I don’t think there are non-exclusivists in this room.”However, Volf said religious exclusivism does not necessarily lead to political exclusivism or the restriction of freedom of beliefs and expression in a certain society.Indeed, he said, history provides examples of religious exclusivists who also supported toleration of other belief systems.“It’s not just that religious exclusivists can be political pluralists, but as a matter of fact, historically, they have invented political pluralism out of their own interests.”Furthermore, in some cases, exclusivism even encourages toleration, he said.“You can be a religious exclusivist, and just because of your exclusivist religious convictions, you can embrace pluralism as a political project,” Volf said.Unfortunately, exclusivism does not always engender pluralism, but requires certain conditions, Volf said. One such condition, he said, is an “interest in commonalities rather than differences.”“We need the kinds of relations between religions in which they would be able to adjust their own expectations from each other in the context of living in the common space while staying true to their own identity and true to their own vocation,” he said.While these relations might initially seem difficult to develop, Volt said they are actually very natural to humans.  He gave the example of family life, in which family members must take into account the needs and desires of each other in order to live together in harmony.“You don’t make decisions without thinking how your teenage son’s going to react,” he said.Volf said this approach to encouraging coexistence through a meaningful dialogue is particularly important in combatting nihilism, which asserts that values and value systems have no foundation.In contrast to nihilism, he said, many world religions actually support many commonly held democratic values.“Each world religion will have and can have resources within itself to embrace, say, freedom of religion, to embrace equality of others,” he said.Lectures and panels will continue throughout the day today as part of the Catholic Social Tradition Conference hosted by the Center for Social Concerns.  A full schedule of events can be found at http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/mission/cst/2015ConferenceSchedule.shtmlTags: Catholic Social Teaching, religious pluralism, Vatican IIlast_img read more

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Help your members avoid these mistakes

first_imgI read an excellent article on the online version of the Housing Wire about the 8 common mistakes that first time home buyers make and how to avoid them. It gave some practical advice to home buyers about what to do and more importantly not to do. There’s something to glean from this in terms of being memberlicious. Learn more by reading on….The first two mistakes are the ones I think Credit Unions are best positioned to help members avoid when buying their first home.#1. They don’t watch their finances before buying a home.and# 2. They don’t take the time to get pre-approved before house hunting.How do you help with this? Well think about what a borrower needs to know and remember that you do mortgage loans every day and that a first time home buyer is just that “it’s the first time they’ve done this.”A good way to think about this from the member’s point of view would be to consider how you train rookie originators. What do you train them on? You train them on how to get members qualified for a home loan and what the underwriting requirements are. Turn that training into tips for members. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Everyone deserves digital . . . right?

first_imgImagine leaving your home early, wearing a face mask and gloves as you head to your local credit union branch. Upon arrival, you see your fellow members wearing their own PPE and standing six-feet apart to keep a safe distance next to a red hashmark on the sidewalk,  while waiting their turn to be called forward to access their accounts and services.This is the reality for many of the Caribbean’s credit unions, where approximately 80% operate without digitization. With a national emergency declared in many of the nations throughout the region, many credit unions have only been allowed to be open two days a week for a limited number of hours per day. Too many members standing in line waiting are seeing their credit union branches close before they can even get in, putting an additional layer of stress on the daily challenges they face.Members waiting to enter their credit union in Antigua. (Note the red social distancing hash marks they are standing by.) Photo courtesy of the Caribbean Confederation of Credit Unions (CCCU).Millions of credit union members worldwide are facing similar barriers. A lack of digitization touches not only credit unions, but national associations as well. In Ukraine, the entire credit union system was closed for weeks before reopening due to an exceptional advocacy effort. But the work there continues, with efforts to provide PPE supplies to each credit union in order to assure safe member service.In Asia, credit union staff are meeting members where they are—out in the street—and providing them with cash withdrawals or loans to help them get by.But imagine for a moment a credit union movement that is fully digitized. Members are staying safe in the comfort of their own home, accessing services and staff online or via a mobile app. Staff can serve members and work with their colleagues in a safe, secure way.In the context of COVID-19, the Worldwide Foundation for Credit Unions and World Council of Credit Unions has shined a stronger spotlight on accelerating digital transformation of credit unions everywhere. Digital is no longer seen as a convenience. It is a necessity to maintain staff and member safety while keeping credit union doors open.The Everyone Deserves Digital campaign was created to generate stronger awareness for and provide support to global credit union digitization. Connected to World Council’s Challenge 2025: the global digitization of credit unions, the campaign supports the growth and creation of development projects that focus on digitizing credit unions and providing digital tools to members.There are over 85,400 credit unions worldwide, yet far from all of them provide digital services to their members. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that digital transformation of the front-end member experience and back-end office operations is vital for the survival of credit unions and our movement.Shouldn’t digital services be considered a universal membership right as well as a tool to keep everyone connected with a credit union in a safe and secure way? We think so. Join us in this global effort to strengthen and sustain credit unions worldwide ahead the next global crisis.A Member waiting to enter their credit union in the Caribbean. Photo courtesy of the Caribbean Confederation of Credit Unions (CCCU). 70SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mike Reuter Mike Reuter is the Executive Director of the Worldwide Foundation for Credit Unions, the 501c3 charitable nonprofit that supports the World Council of Credit Unions in its mission of providing … Web: https://www.woccu.org Detailslast_img read more

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Lady Bulldogs SEI Tourney Results

first_imgThe BMS 7th Grade Volleyball team won their first game in the SEIC tournament.  They defeated Greendale 25-15, 25-22.  The girls played strong. Margaret Wilson led all servers with 9 points.  Laura Schwegman chipped in 7 points.  Kaylie Raver & Kaylin Hinners   had 5 points.  Annie Shane contributed 4 points. In the front row Elena Keisel had 3 kills.  Schwegman added 2 kills and Kaylin added 1 kill.  Renee Lecher, Sara Lamping, Taylor Blanton also contributed to the win.  The Bulldogs play again on Tuesday at home.The BMS 8th Grade Volleyball team play exceptionally well but still lost to Greendale in the first round of the SEIC tournament 21-25, 19-25.  Unfortunately the team missed some key serves.  Top servers were Laney Walsman added 6 points.  Kennedy Westrick chipped in 4 points.  Jadyn Harrington added 3 points.  Samantha Kessens & Caymen Werner earned 2 points each.  From the front row Werner, Kessens, and Kaitlyn Sarringhaus each had 2 kills.  Harrington & Walsman earned 1 kill each.  Isabelle Westerfeld, Tiffany Hawker, Ashlee Cornn, and Timbre Davies were all worked hard in the defeat. The team ends with a record of 7-5.Courtesy of Bulldogs Cpach Angie Ehrman.last_img read more

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