Frank Zappa’s Hollywood Hills Estate Has Been Sold Off For Over $5 Million

first_imgAfter being listed by the Zappa Family Trust earlier this summer, the late Frank Zappa‘s Laurel Canyon home has sold for $5.25 million. The beautiful compound, contained on a relatively small half-acre of land in the Hollywood Hills, was purchased by Zappa in the late 60’s for just $74,000 and came under the ownership of his family after his death in 1993. The faux-Tudor house (built in the late 1930’s) boasts six bedrooms and seven bathrooms in 6,759 square-feet of multi-level living space, and features a variety of quirky embellishments,like the dragon mural in the formal dining room, porthole windows and doors salvaged from vintage submarines. It also features various architecturally unusual reading nooks and creative work spaces. In addition to the main house, the land also includes two architecturally adventurous detached guest houses and an additional attached guest apartment. Other features of note include a double-height art gallery with parquet flooring, Zappa’s sprawling recording studio, and “The Vault,” a storage chamber beneath the house where Zappa kept his private archives under lock and key during his lifetime. The terraced, tree-shaded grounds include a hodgepodge of decks and patios, a greenhouse, swimming pool, roof top tennis court, and lush gardens with mosaic accents. The sale of the house is another step in the ever-contentious disputes between the surviving Zappas regarding control over and rights to the Zappa Family Trust. You can see a gallery of photos of the house here.last_img read more

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How to effectively analyze your deposit portfolio

All deposits are not created equal. Say that again, say it loudly.  That’s because traditionally bankers—credit union executives included—divided their world into two. On one side of the ledger there were loans, on the other deposits.  And, in many institutions, that’s about as granular as analysis got.Not today.  Now savvy institutions are doing deep data dives into their deposit portfolio, with the explicit aims of finding more and better ways to serve more consumers.In the process, the credit union may also find itself getting more deposits from members because member needs are better served.Picture this scenario.  You learn that a longtime member just moved $59,000 out of your institution. You inquire into it.  What you find out is that the consumer was approached by XYZ—maybe a competitor—that offered many times the interest you had been paying the member. So the consumer did the rational thing: he or she followed the money.Except: what if you in fact have a product that would have paid that consumer yet higher interest with less risk?  That’s right: this business could have been saved if only…. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr read more

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