USC Signs Contract for Construction of Three Krivak IV Class Frigates for Russian Navy

first_img View post tag: Naval USC Signs Contract for Construction of Three Krivak IV Class Frigates for Russian Navy View post tag: class View post tag: construction View post tag: Krivak View post tag: Frigates View post tag: IV View post tag: Navy View post tag: contract View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Forcenter_img September 15, 2011 View post tag: three Industry news Russia’s United Shipbuilding Corporation said on Wednesday it has signed a contract with the Defense Ministry on the construction of another…(rian)[mappress]Source: rian, September 15, 2011; View post tag: Russian View post tag: sign View post tag: USC Back to overview,Home naval-today USC Signs Contract for Construction of Three Krivak IV Class Frigates for Russian Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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Recruiting bacteria for innovation

first_imgFor many people, biofilms conjure up images of slippery stones in streambeds or dirty drains. A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University thinks of them instead as a robust new platform for designer nanomaterials that could help clean polluted rivers, manufacture pharmaceutical products, fabricate new textiles, and more.Biofilms are communities of bacteria ensconced in a matrix of slimy, but extremely tough, extracellular material composed of sugars, proteins, genetic material, and more. Researchers wanted to give them a facelift, and developed a novel protein-engineering system called BIND to do so. With BIND, which stands for biofilm-integrated nanofiber display, the team said biofilms could become living foundries for large-scale production of biomaterials that can be programmed to provide functions not possible with existing materials. They reported the proof-of-concept today in the journal Nature Communications.“Most biofilm-related research today focuses on how to get rid of biofilms, but we demonstrate here that we can engineer these super-tough natural materials to perform specific functions, so we may want them around in specific quantities and for specific applications,” said Wyss Institute Core Faculty member Neel Joshi, the study’s senior author. Joshi is also an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).Biofilms also can self-assemble and self-heal. “If they get damaged, they grow right back because they are living tissues,” said lead author Peter Nguyen, a postdoctoral fellow at the Wyss Institute and SEAS.During biofilm formation, individual bacteria pump out proteins that self-assemble outside the cell, creating tangled networks of fibers that essentially glue the cells together into communities that keep the bacteria safer than they would be on their own. In this video, the Wyss Institute’s Neel Joshi and Postdoctoral Fellow Peter Nguyen describe how their protein engineering system called BIND (biofilm-integrated nanofiber display) could redefine biofilms as large-scale production platforms for biomaterials with functionality not currently possible. An animation depicts how it works on a molecular level.Interest in biofilm engineering is skyrocketing, and while several other teams have recently developed genetic tools to control biofilm formation, Joshi’s team altered the composition of the extracellular material itself, essentially turning it into a self-replicating production platform to churn out whatever material they wish to produce.“Until recently, there was not enough cooperation between synthetic biologists and biomaterials researchers to exploit the synthetic potential of biofilms this way. We are trying to bridge that gap,” Joshi said.The team genetically fuse a protein with a particular desired function — for example, one known to adhere to steel — onto a small protein called CsgA that is already produced by E. coli bacteria. The appended domain goes along for the ride through the natural process by which CsgA is secreted outside the cell, where it self-assembles into super-tough proteins called amyloid nanofibers. These amyloid proteins retain the functionality of the added protein, ensuring the desired function, in this case that the biofilm adheres to steel.Amyloid proteins traditionally get a bad rap for their role in causing tremendous health challenges such as Alzheimer’s disease, but here their role is fundamental to making BIND robust. The amyloids can spontaneously assemble into fibers that, by weight, are stronger than steel and stiffer than silk.“We are excited about the versatility of the method, too,” Joshi said. The team demonstrated an ability to fuse 12 different proteins to the CsgA protein, with widely varying sequences and lengths. This means that in principle they can use this technology to display virtually any protein sequence — a significant feature because proteins perform an array of impressive functions, from binding to foreign particles, to carrying out chemical reactions, to transmitting signals, providing structural support, and transporting or storing certain molecules.Not only can these functions be programmed into the biofilm one at a time, they can be combined to create multifunctional biofilms as well.The concept of the microbial factory is not a new one, but this is the first time it is being applied to materials, as opposed to soluble molecules such as drugs or fuels. “We are essentially programming the cells to be fabrication plants,” Joshi said. “They don’t just produce a raw material as a building block, they orchestrate the assembly of those blocks into higher-order structures and maintain those structures over time.”“The foundational work Neel and his team are doing with biofilms offers a glimpse into a much more environmentally sustainable future, where gargantuan factories are reduced to the size of a cell that we can program to manufacture new materials that meet our everyday needs — from textiles to energy and environmental clean-up,” said Wyss Institute Founding Director Don Ingber.For now, the team has demonstrated the ability to program E. coli biofilms that stick to certain substrates such as steel, and others that can immobilize an array of proteins or promote the templating of silver for construction of nanowires.This work was primarily funded by the Wyss Institute. The authors also acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the A*STAR National Science Graduate Fellowship.last_img read more

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Student reports assault

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) is investigating a sexual assault that occurred on campus over the weekend, according to an email sent to students Wednesday afternoon. The reported sexual assault occurred in a dorm during the early hours of Sunday morning, police said. The victim knew the person who allegedly committed the assault. “Sexual assault can happen to anyone,” the email stated. “College students are more likely to be assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger. This means that the person perpetrating the assault could be part of the campus community.” In the email, NDSP reminded students to be aware of their safety and watch out for friends to reduce the chances of a sexual assault. Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors or sexual assault can be found online with both NDSP and the Committee for Sexual Assault Prevention, the email stated.last_img read more

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Olympics: Mexican divers Castillo, Sánchez take seventh

first_imgBy Dialogo August 02, 2012 Mexico’s Yahel Castillo and Julián Sánchez: The divers placed seventh in the 3-meter synchronized platform with 415.14 points. China’s Qin Kai and Luo Yutong won gold with 477 points, followed by Russia’s Ilya Zakharov and Evgeniy Kuznetsov (459.63) and the United States’ Troy Dumais and Kristian Ipsen (446.7). The Ukraine’s Oleksiy Prygorov and Illya Kvasha placed fourth (434.22), followed by Great Britain’s Chris Mears and Nicholas Robinson-Baker (432.6) and Canada’s Alexandre Despatie and Reuben Ross (421.83). LONDON – Here’s what you might have missed from Wednesday’s Olympic action: Here’s what you should keep an eye on Aug. 3: Brazil’s women’s basketball team vs. Canada: Brazil looks for its first win in Group B play. The women are coming off a 67-61 loss to Australia on Aug. 1 in a game in which Karla Costa scored 22 points and Érika De Souza added 11. Brazil opened its tournament with a 73-58 loss to France and a 69-59 loss to Russia. Canada, which is coming off a 64-60 loss to France, opened its tournament with a loss to Russia before defeating Great Britain. Brazil’s women’s soccer team vs. Japan: Brazil, which has won the silver medal in each of the past two Olympics, faces Japan in the quarterfinals. Brazil, which finished second in Group E with wins over New Zealand and Cameroon and a loss to Great Britain, should be tested by the Japanese, which advanced out of Group F with a win and two ties. Brazil’s César Cielo: He placed sixth in the 100-meter freestyle after he took bronze in the event four years ago in Beijing. The United States’ Nathan Adrian won the gold in 47.52 seconds, just ahead of James Magnussen of Australia (47.53) and Canada’s Brent Hayden (47.80). France’s Yannick Agnel took fourth in 47.84, followed by Sebastiaan Verschuren of the Netherlands (47.88) and Cielo (47.92). Cuba’s Hanser García placed seventh in 48.04. last_img read more

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