Evening with Champions

first_img An Evening with Champions Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Get a leg up All at once Emily Hughes ’11 dips low and aims high. Ice blue An expansive shot of the Bright Hockey Center displays the color, whirlwind, and fun of the night’s event. There is a light Linda Yao ’10, wearing her winter coat, operates the spotlight for skaters. Hey, it’s an ice rink after all! Sisters in arms Dazzling bodices and frilly dresses are just a few pleasures of skating. Here, members of Team Excel Junior, which features skaters from 18 New England regions, manage to be both identically dressed and distinctive. Shadow dancing Paul Wylie ’91 and 1976 Olympic medalist Dorothy Hamill move under the spotlight during the 40th anniversary of the Jimmy Fund benefit “An Evening with Champions,” sponsored by Harvard. With her spotlight purring like an old projector, Linda Yao ’10 used a steady hand to follow the cast of famed figure skaters as they shaved graceful ribbons into the ice during “An Evening with Champions.” “La Vie en Rose,” sung by Louis Armstrong, played over the loudspeakers, and a kaleidoscope of light bathed the ice.Over 40 years, the skating event has raised $2.4 million for the Jimmy Fund of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Brett Michael Giblin ’11, who co-chaired the event, said, “I truly believe that the reason this weekend was such a rousing success, from the incredible skating to the nearly perfect execution, was due to the fact that our volunteers were able to keep the objective that they were working toward — helping children with cancer — in the forefront of their minds.”The event struck a personal chord with 2006 Olympics skater Emily Hughes ’11, who first visited Harvard to participate in the event in 2006 to pay tribute to her mother, a cancer survivor. Hughes said, “I’m happy and excited that I can do this every year, and that it can go to a worthy cause. Cancer research has a more personal feel for me.” A shoulder to drape on Kimberly Navarro rides the back of partner Brent Bommentre. last_img read more

Read More →

Who Placed a Pipe Bomb in a Popular Swimming Hole?

first_imgMost of us don’t expect to find a bomb at our favorite swimming hole or fishing spot. Recently, however, North Carolina authorities were alerted to a makeshift pipe bomb in the Pigeon River.A man called 911 around 1:00pm on Saturday, June 30, after noticing a pipe bomb in a local swimming hole near Sunburst Campground along Lake Logan Road in Haywood County, N.C. (Listen to the audio recording of the 911 call below. The caller’s name has been redacted.)Audio Playerhttps://www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Redacted-Sunburst-explosive.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Blue Ridge Outdoors talked to Lindsay Renger, Public Information Officer at the Haywood County Sheriff’s Department, and Lieutenant Joe Silberman, member of the Asheville Police Department Hazardous Device Team (HDT), for more information.Though responding authorities weren’t initially certain exactly how dangerous the bomb could be, the HDT wasted no time in evacuating the campground and recreation area prior to investigating the device. Fortunately, there are no homes or residents live in the area, and the swimming hole isn’t particularly close to any major roads, public areas, or structures. The closest overpass and other portions of nearby roads were completely blocked off during the operation.The bomb itself appeared to be unprofessionally assembled, made from a metal pipe not quite a foot long and about two inches in diameter. According to Lt. Silberman, it had been submerged in the river for some time, but he can’t pinpoint the device’s age or origin.  He said the capabilities of most explosives and propellants aren’t necessarily mitigated by water, and that black powder can be soaked for years and still detonated when dried out completely. Possibly, someone had disposed of the improvised device in the river out of fear, assuming the water would render it useless. Silberman said most people assume incorrectly that anything underwater will eventually disappear, similar to attitudes concerning ordinary garbage or pollution.Once the area had been completely cleared, the HDT used a specialized remote controlled bomb-disposing robot to counter-charge the pipe bomb from a safe distance. Essentially, they introduced a small amount of explosive, which breached the outer layer of the bomb, causing it to detonate under supervision. While the explosion was just as large as it might have been if the bomb were detonated accidentally, Silberman said this method was safer than attempting to dismantle or remove the device. After the detonation, the squad donned light armor and conducted a thorough post-explosion investigation of the area. No one was hurt, and the area was declared safe that evening by 6:00pm. Potential leads concerning the bomb’s origin have since been exhausted, and the case is now officially closed.Lt. Silberman said that no two improvised explosive devices look the same, and if outdoor enthusiasts ever find something that looks particularly suspicious or out of place, they should leave the area immediately and inform local authorities.  “Don’t leave it, don’t touch it, don’t try to set it off, just leave,” he says.  “Whoever found this one did the right thing.”A transcript of the 911 call appears below. Contact the Haywood County Sheriff’s Department if you have any tips or information.Haywood County Police Department 911 call(edited slightly for clarity; caller’s name has been redacted for privacy)Operator (male): “Haywood County 911; where is your emergency?”Caller (male): “It’s up at Sunburst, just past the swimmin’ hole.”O: “Ok, what’s going on?”C: “I’ve found an explosive device.”O: “You found an explosive device?”C: “Homemade explosive device.  I was doing some metal detecting and I picked up about 77 on my scale.  So I reached down and I moved some rocks, and lo and behold, there it was.  Now I took it up out of the water and laid it near the big boulder – there’s some people down there, they know about it, when you guys show up, they’ll point it out and show you where it’s at.”O: “What exactly does [it look like]?”C: “It’s a cast pipe, got a cast body … it’s got black tape wrapped around it, it’s got a green fuse connected to the top … it has not been lit, it’s got a wire connected to it.  I can’t tell … I believe it’s a fuse.”O: “Alright, I’ve got them on the way to you, I’ll tell them to look for you.  Do the best you can, I know you can’t make ‘em, but try to encourage [the people there] to move away from that thing as best you can.”C: “Alright, it’s just past the campground.”O: “Alright, we’ve got them on the way.”C: “Alright, thank you.”last_img read more

Read More →

South Africa wins All Africa Challenge Trophy in Ghana

first_imgSouth Africa were crowned champions at this year’s edition of the All Africa Challenge Trophy (AACT) event held at the Achimota Golf Club in Accra, Ghana.The South Africans beat off competition from 18 other African teams that participated in the three day event. The winners were followed by four East African counterparts Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and Zimbabwe respectively in the top five chart.The host team, Ghana, placed sixth while their fellow West African neighbours, Senegal came 7th, Zambia placed 8th and Nigeria placed 9th. Each player from the top nine teams was rewarded for participating in the event.Madina Hussein from Tanzania emerged as the tournament’s best player and was followed by Zethu Nyeki from South Africa. Zimbabwe’s 15-year-old golfer, Danielle Bekker was presented with the best Junior players’ award after she nailed 251 points.The event was graced by Baffour Osei Hyenman Brentuo, Manwerehene of Asantehene, Otumfuo Osei Tutu II. The Manwerehene who spoke on behalf of Otumfuo Osei Tutu II said the Asantehene would continue to render his relentless support to Ghana Golf Association as he continues to do annually.last_img read more

Read More →

All trick and no treat, snow & very cold weather to arrive late Monday

first_imgMASON CITY — There may be more than just frost on the pumpkin next week. We’re only a little over a month into fall, but forecasters say wide sections of Iowa could soon be looking more wintry — as snow may fly late Monday and into Tuesday. Meteorologist Allan Curtis, at the National Weather Service, says any flakes that do fall won’t linger long.  “The best chances for people seeing snow is going to be across the north and northwest,” Curtis says. “They may even see a little bit of those flurries stick to the ground through the morning. As you work toward the south and eastern portions of the state, things are going to be a little warmer so any flurries they see will quickly dissipate as the day goes on Tuesday.” It’s the time of year when the weather does a lot of flip-flopping, and kids may be forced to wear coats over their trick-or-treat costumes. “It goes back and forth from fairly comfortable, like we’re going to see today in the 50s, to not quite as comfortable,” Curtis says. “Early to the middle of next week, right in time for Halloween, we’ll see a system push through and we’ll probably see highs struggle to reach the mid- to upper-30s, both Tuesday and Wednesday.” The normal high temperature for Des Moines on this date is 60 degrees, so having highs only in the 30s is well below average. He notes, the first snowfall of the season can get some Iowans a little worked up. “We always want to stress to people, if you are traveling, even though it’s going to be some light flurries and snow, just take a little extra caution,” Curtis says. “People get excited when those events occur.” The long-range forecast calls for a slight warm-up by next Thursday. Winter arrives this year on December 21st.last_img read more

Read More →