REM’s Michael Stipe Endorses Bernie Sanders For His ‘Honesty And Realness’

first_imgFrom Red Hot Chili Peppers to Jon Fishman, musicians continue to expound their support for presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. Most recently, R.E.M. frontman, Michael Stipe, told Rolling Stone why his vote would go to the Democratic candidate. “In art and in music, I seek out and listen for honesty and realness. That’s why I’m backing Bernie Sanders for President of the United States. In politics, he is the person who is offering me the most honesty and the most realness.” Well said, Mr. Stipe, well said.He further explains himself off-camera:“I’m a feminist. I’ve marched, supported and fought for black rights, privacy rights and LGBTQ rights. I’m deeply concerned about the environment. I’m completely freaked out by fracking. Sanders takes positions on all of these issues that have [outshone] any other candidate that I’ve seen — and I have looked, believe me. I identify with him. I’m a proud liberal, but I also lean more center when it comes to policy. I get it that there are people who don’t see things exactly the way I do.“I’ve been around long enough to see when a politician is waffling or dodging hard questions, or trying to alter or rewrite the positions they have taken. Sanders is refreshingly not that. Listen, politics is not easy, and America is so vast — there are lots of different viewpoints out there. It’s refreshing to have a candidate who speaks his mind, who makes sense, who isn’t demagogic. His appeal and his honesty — once people see who he is and what he stands for — is perfect for now. It’s very 21st century. It is idealistic, but also realistic.”You can read more about his political opinion in this interview, or watch Stipe’s endorsement below:[via Rolling Stone]last_img read more

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This Amazing Animated Film Is Packed With Phish, Bowie & Star Wars References

first_imgGearing up for Summer Tour, fellow Phish fan Nick Setteducato has shared an animated music video called “2016: A Space Oddity,” featuring hundreds of Phish references, as well as references to David Bowie, Star Wars, and Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. The five-minute video follows a characterized Jon Fishman as he launches off to space with purpose of destroying an incoming asteroid. He ends up getting lost in battle versus a puppy-led alien spaceship, and ultimately lands himself in Mike Gordon‘s cereal bowl.While the four members are not necessarily playing themselves in the short film, the stop-motion video entertains on several levels and is worth watching below:Setteducato’s production follows his 2014 project, Flight Of The Mockingbird, which you can also watch below:You can follow his creations on Lucy’s Place Productions Facebook page, where he shares updates on his projects. He also encourages fans to donate to the Mockingbird Foundation, a non-profit organization founded by Phish fans in 1996 to generate charitable proceeds from the Phish community.JamBase sat down with Setteducato to talk about how he became inspired to work on this Phish-centered universe. “The video I made back in 2014, Flight of the Mockingbird, was just a fun way for me to learn the process of making a short stop-motion video, and to combine that with my unhealthy Phish obsession,” he explains. “This new video is really just an extension of that. I was very encouraged by the positive response to that first video, so I thought I’d try something a little more ambitious for the next one. I settled on this idea of an absurd, surreal, space adventure inspired by episodes of the great ’60s British TV series Thunderbirds, and set to a short, upbeat instrumental track. The ideas just flowed from there. Maybe another Phish song? Maybe a killer asteroid or a wormhole, and a “Big Black Furry Creature From Mars”? Maybe Fishman is the pilot, and maybe he ends up in a giant bowl of cereal? You know, the usual stuff… Also, my dog Otis Redding makes a cameo as the alien.”What an incredibly artistic way to spend your free time![via JamBase]last_img read more

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Washington DC, heart of US power, frozen by pandemic

first_imgWith just a month to go before the presidential election, Washington, the hub of American politics, is still in the social and economic deep freeze it was plunged into by the Covid-19 outbreak that began six months ago.The 12,000 people due to take part in upcoming meets at the World Bank and IMF will not stroll the sidewalks of the spruced-up city center, which before the pandemic had been touted as example of the regeneration of US downtowns.Instead, they will be sitting at home, in front of their laptops. As well as its political activities, the city had billed itself in the past two decades as a hub for international conventions and conferences. Before the pandemic, “we were experiencing record attendance and visitation to Washington, not only with congresses and meetings, but of course, also with the leisure market… and the international markets,” said Elliott Ferguson, director of Destination DC. And that activity all stoked the local economy. “We were on pace to do well over 25 million visitors to the city, over 42 large congresses,” he said. Now the city is expecting some 11 million visitors.Working from home For sure, some of the trendier districts of the city have bounced back to life. Restaurants have opened up outdoor terraces and rooftop dining and have started to fill up in the late summer, thanks to local clientele.But in the downtown area, not far from the White House, the fast food restaurants of K Street — the central artery where busy lobbyists and lawyers used to grab lunch — have not re-opened and struggle to attract local business.That is because the thousands of government and institutional workers — including the 9,000 of the World Bank, excluding its consultants — are all working from home until the end of the year.The white-collar workers who filled the offices of the nerve center of US and international politics have overwhelmingly chosen to carry on with remote work.And they have the backing of Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser, who has implemented one of the strictest regimes of restrictions in the country to keep the virus death toll down to 629 deaths and more than 12,250 infections.Empty hotels As a result, by the end of July the economic activity of the city center was just 12 percent of what it had been the year before, with 95 percent of employees working from home, according to Downtown D.C Business Improvement District. Hotel occupancy was at just eight percent in June, down from 74 percent in February.An employee of the pharmacy chain CVS, just a few yards from the IMF building, said the branch was probably doomed if the big institutions do not open up their doors again soon.Handing out at best 200 prescriptions per week instead of more than 1,000 before the pandemic, and with its opening hours tailored to those of the neighboring institutions, the employee said the store would be lucky to hang on for six months.”I’m afraid CVS will have to close this location if they don’t come back to work downtown,” the worker said, asking to be named.Despite the gloomy mood, Gregory O’Dell, head of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, the mainstay of the city’s conferences, hopes there will be better days ahead.The Center, which receives some 1.5 million people each year, reopened two weeks ago, unveiling a variety of sophisticated equipment designed to help ward off the virus.Artificial intelligence The convention center in the heart of Washington has been fitted with scanners that take the temperature of visitors.Interior surfaces are frequently sprayed with disinfectant capable of killing the virus.And artificial intelligence monitors visitors and registers if they are getting too close to each and ignoring social distancing guidelines.The cancellation of 93 events this year left the center with steep losses, totally $345.5 million.”Today, more than ever before, is such an important time for people and communities to come together, and conventions and meetings, sports and entertainment have the power to do that, even virtually,” said O’Dell.And if people start to get a taste for all things virtual??”I don’t think we’re getting used to it,” said Elliott Ferguson. “I think we are very much so missing out on the opportunity to connect in person.””It’s very difficult to get someone interested in your product, or whatever your prototype is,” he said. “We need to touch it, we need to feel it.”Topics : Behind the giant bay windows of the World Bank, security guards remain at their posts, but idle. Outside, the sidewalks of Washington DC are largely empty.The bank is open, ready to host but its twice annual meetings with international financial institutions. But the meetings are all virtual these days.Next door, at the HQ2 building of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) a sign says “temporarily closed.” It has been hanging there for six months. last_img read more

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