US Navy’s Spain-based destroyers test new SeaRAM CIWS

first_img Share this article April 3, 2017 Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy’s Spain-based destroyers complete final live fire tests of SeaRAM CIWS US Navy’s Spain-based destroyers complete final live fire tests of SeaRAM CIWS View post tag: USS Rosscenter_img View post tag: USS Donald Cook View post tag: US Navy View post tag: SeaRAM Two of four forward deployed U.S. Navy destroyers used live missiles from their new SeaRAM close-in weapons systems to intercept drones that mimicked anti-ship cruise missiles.On March 30, USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) and USS Ross (DDG 71) took turns intercepting missiles in the Gulf of Cadiz on Spain’s southwestern coast.The two destroyers joined USS Porter and USS Carney as the SeaRAM-capable ships. Porter and Carney previously conducted successful live-fire SeaRAM missile exercises on March 2016, and July 2016, respectively.As part of the U.S. Navy’s “Speed to Fleet” program, the SeaRAM self-defense missile system was rapidly fielded to the four Arleigh Burke-class destroyers that are forward deployed to Rota, Spain. In combination with the ships’ Aegis weapons system, the SeaRAM system provides enhanced point defense for these ships by combining components of the Phalanx close-in weapon system with the capabilities of the Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM).All four ships received this upgrade in less than two years, improving their existing capability to counter modern anti-ship cruise missiles.“This game-changing technology continues to ensure our ability for these multi-mission ships to steam into harm’s way as required—anywhere in this theater—in support of U.S. national interests, and in support of our allies and partners,” said Capt. Tate Westbrook, Commander, Task Force 65, Commodore, Destroyer Squadron 60. “These ships patrol throughout this theater with an array of the most-capable weapons in the world; we put the concept of ‘distributed lethality’ to work in this pivotal region every day.”last_img read more

Read More →

Study supports concept of 2-stage H5N1 vaccination

first_imgOct 13, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The human immune system may respond better to a vaccine for a new strain of H5N1 avian influenza if it is prepared in advance with a vaccine based on an existing H5N1 strain, the preliminary results of a government-sponsored study suggest.In the study, 37 people who had received an H5N1 vaccine in 1998 were recently given another H5N1 vaccine based on a 2004 strain. They had a much stronger immune response than did another group who received only the newer vaccine, according to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).”These preliminary findings need to be confirmed in larger studies, but they offer the intriguing possibility that pre-pandemic priming with existing H5N1 vaccines may boost the immune response to a different H5N1 vaccine tailor-made years later to thwart an emerging pandemic,” NIAID Director Dr. Anthony S. Fauci commented in a news release.Researchers from the University of Rochester were scheduled to present a preliminary report of their findings today at the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s annual meeting in Toronto, the NIAID reported.When a pandemic flu strain emerges, it will probably take several months to develop a vaccine to match it, and more than one dose will probably be necessary to generate protective immunity, the NIAID said. But providing two doses would be logistically difficult, so researchers have been looking for other strategies. One proposed option is to vaccinate people in advance with a related vaccine in the hope that only one dose of the pandemic vaccine would be necessary.After the first human cases of H5N1 illness occurred in Hong Kong in 1997, the NIAID funded the production of an experimental vaccine based on the Hong Kong virus and tested it in a clinical trial at the University of Rochester in 1998. The researchers found 37 people from that trial who were willing to take part in the new study. Participants in the earlier trial had received two doses of the vaccine.This year, the 37 volunteers were vaccinated with one 90-microgram (mcg) dose of an H5N1 vaccine based on a strain that circulated in Vietnam in 2004, according to a study abstract provided by the University of Rochester. The vaccine is made by Sanofi Pasteur and is the one the US government is currently stockpiling in the face of the pandemic threat, according to Fauci. (That vaccine has shown only modest benefits in trials so far, with about half of vaccinees showing a good immune response after two 90-mcg doses, or about a dozen times the dosage used in seasonal flu vaccine.)The previously vaccinated volunteers had a mean antibody titer (measured by hemagglutination inhibition) of 64.0, with 70% of them achieving a titer of at least 40, according to the study abstract. These findings were compared with results in some volunteers who received 90 mcg of the Sanofi vaccine in a previous study and had never had H5N1 vaccine before. These volunteers had a mean antibody titer of 27.1 after one dose, and only 29% had a titer of at least 40.”We studied a relatively small group, so that certainly, this issue needs to be studied more thoroughly in a larger group of people,” senior author Dr. John J. Treanor, MD, commented in a University of Rochester news release.If further studies confirm the findings, pandemic response planners might consider giving a “priming” shot to key personnel, such as healthcare workers, said Treanor, who directs the university’s Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit.Fauci told CIDRAP News today, “The data look very encouraging, but the number of people [in the study] is relatively small.””These data add some scientific credence to the concept that there may be some benefit to priming someone with a potential pandemic strain even though the actual pandemic strain might be somewhat different,” he said. “It informs the debate to allow you to have a more scientific basis if you’re considering priming.”See also:NIH news releasehttp://www.niaid.nih.gov/news/newsreleases/2006/Pages/IDSA.aspxUniversity of Rochester news releasehttp://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-10/uorm-ebs101206.phplast_img read more

Read More →

Race activist Rachel Dolezal: ‘I identify as black’

first_imgBBC News 16 June 2015On Monday, Ms Dolezal resigned from the anti-racism organisation NAACP, after her parents said she was pretending to be black.Speaking to NBC, she said that from the age of five she “was drawing self-portraits with the brown crayon instead of the peach crayon”.She added that she “takes exception” to suggestions she had deceived people.“This is not some freak-show, Birth of a Nation blackface performance,” she told NBC’s Matt Lauer. “This is on a real connected level how I’ve had to go there with the experience.”Hours beforehand, her mother Rutheanne Dolezal told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme that her daughter had become “disconnected from reality”.Ms Dolezal’s estranged parents say her origins are mostly white, with a small amount of Native American ancestry. They say that she has no black origins.They have produced childhood pictures of her daughter with pale skin, freckles and fair hair.http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-33152596last_img read more

Read More →

Premier League unmoved on fixtures

first_img Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho, in particular, has bemoaned such a short turnaround in fixtures with his players on occasion forced to compete three times – two English top-flight matches either side of a Champions League game – in the space of eight days. This has been blamed as one of the factors for no English club progressing beyond the last 16 of Europe’s premier club competition last season, leading to fears England will lose one of their four Champions League spots. The Premier League will not move individual fixtures in an effort to placate clubs competing in the Champions League. While Premier League chairman Richard Scudamore wants to see English clubs go deep into the competition, he insists his organisation will not move top-flight fixtures to give those competing in the Champions League more time to prepare. “Yes, there is a concern,” Scudamore said in the Guardian and the Daily Telegraph. “On a practical basis, if we keep declining it’s bad for our coefficient and we’ll lose one of our Champions League places. We have to be careful. “It’s a concern but it’s difficult to see what we can do about it centrally as the clubs are trying hard enough to win. “From 2016-17 we are playing some games on Friday nights but we won’t move individual fixtures as you can’t do it for everybody. “Champions League teams play on a Tuesday and a Wednesday so you can’t move matches just to suit one team. It completely ruins everything you do. “The entire fixture calendar in the UK is predicated upon clubs having a three-day gap, so you can’t bring games forward to a Friday. Maybe because there’s normally something going on the previous Wednesday. “We’ve looked at it but it’s practically impossible to do anything.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Read More →

Internships lead to jobs, study says

first_imgThere has been a significant rise in college students searching for internships as a way to secure a stable job after graduation, according to a study by The Wall Street Journal. University officials say this trend has been seen in USC students as well.Students at USC have been seeking out more internships, said Angie Sabido-Wood, director of employer relations and research at the USC Career Planning and Placement Center.On the clock · Venessa Matio, a senior majoring in business administration, talks about her résumé with Lee Dresser from the career center. – Dan Doperalski | Daily Trojan“In the last eight or so years, the number of students on campus who have been looking for internships has definitely been increasing,” Sabido-Wood said.She explained that more students are realizing the connection between internships and the job prospects out of college.“Students are becoming more savvy about how to get a job after graduation, and they understand the value of working at an internship. At USC, we’re seeing not just upperclassmen, but even freshmen looking for internship opportunities,” Sabido-Wood said.In a study released by The Wall Street Journal, a quarter of the college recruiters polled said that more than half of their company’s recently graduated employees had previously interned for the company.“The company can get a very valuable read at how good an intern could be as a potential employee there. It allows them to assess the intern with a ‘try before you buy’ mentality, and then hiring them full-time becomes a natural extension of that,” said Alec Levenson, a research scientist with the Center for Effective Organizations at the USC Marshall School of Business.Part of this is related to the current trend of companies converting current interns into full-time employees after they have earned their bachelor’s degree, he said.The trend of in-house hiring as a means of job recruiting has become especially relevant in today’s sluggish economy, as more applicants are using internship experience as a bridge to find a steady or well-paying job.“With the recession going on right now, the supply and demand factor comes into play. Because there are fewer regular jobs available, the option of an internship becomes more important because it gives the person an opportunity to get their foot in the door and keep working in the field of their choice,” Levenson said.A recent survey in the National Association of College and Employers Job Outlook 2011 Fall Preview showed that the Western region of the United States will see the biggest rise in hiring for college graduates in the next year, with a 23.5 percent increase from 2010.Many students on campus have used their internship experience as a way to enhance their résumé and gain real world experience related to their major.“Experience is so important these days because competition is so high. Kids are doing everything in the world right now, and if you want to remain a competitive applicant for graduate school or for a job, you really have to be able to show that you have experience in your field,” said Ana Emamian, a junior majoring in health promotion and disease prevention.Emamian interned as a student researcher at the Perinatology Research Branch for the National Institutes of Health in Detroit for two months this summer.Students can explore their internship options at the career center, located in the Student Union. The center’s resources include the connectSC job website and e-mail updates from the Internship Programs Office.The career center holds an Internship Week during the fall and spring semesters, conducts mock interviews and reviews résumés for students throughout the year.“USC students understand the values of internships and take advantage of them as much as possible.” Sabido-Wood said. “They’re going out there and getting that experience that will lead them to their job of choice after graduation.”last_img read more

Read More →