Timeline of censorship in Turkey

first_img Receive email alerts TurkeyEurope – Central Asia to go further News News Because of the increasingly frequent media freedom violations in Turkey, Reporters Without Borders is starting a Turkey news feed in which it will report significant incidents, in addition to its regular press releases.————-09.11.2015 – Two more journalists investigated for “insulting” ErdoganReporters Without Borders has learned that Erdogan Alayumat, a Diha news agency reporter in the southern city of Mersin, is being investigated for insulting President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in a mid-October interview with a politician. Referring to the JITEM (a secret gendarmerie unit responsible for atrocities in the 1990s), the interview was headlined: “Before it was JITEM, now it’s Recep.” Last week, the judicial authorities also began an investigation to determine whether Ataol Behramoglu, a columnist with the daily Cumhuriyet, insulted the president.There has been a surge in prosecutions on charges of insulting the president under article 299 of the criminal code. As of 30 September, 11 journalists were being prosecuted on this charge and 19 others were being investigated, according to Bianet’s quarterly report on freedom of expression. Today’s Zaman editor Bülent Kenes was held for five days until freed conditionally on 14 October pending trial in connection with 14 Tweets critical of the president. Reporters Without Borders calls for the immediate withdrawal of the charges and the repeal of article 299 on the grounds that it is absurd and disproportionate.—————-06.11.2015 – 26 journalists investigated for “PKK propaganda”Reporters Without Borders has learned that 26 journalists with Kurdish media outlets are being investigated on suspicion of propaganda on behalf of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK). They include Özgür Gündem co-editors Eren Keskin and Hüseyin Aykol and four other journalists who went to the Istanbul law courts on 6 November to make statements to prosecutors. All denied the allegations.It is not yet know if this investigation, initiated on 1 July, will lead to prosecutions. The 26 journalists – 19 with the daily Özgür Gündem, six with the weekly Demokratik Ulus and one with Diha news agency – could face up to seven and a half years in prison under article 7-2 of the anti-terrorism law.Prosecutors have cited articles about the autonomy demands of certain municipal officials and residents of Cizre and Nusaybin, in southeastern Anatolia, and interviews by some of the journalists with members of the YPJ, a Kurdish women’s unit fighting in Syria, for a report about the “revolution” in Rojava (Syrian Kurdistan). Metin Yegin is being investigated in connection with a column in which he criticized the police for the way the body of a PKK fighter killed in the eastern province of Varto was dragged along the ground.—————-06.11.2015 – Police manhandle woman reporter during protestPolice manhandled Beyza Kural, a young reporter for the independent news website Bianet, during an attempt to arrest her while she was covering their use of force to disperse a student demonstration in Istanbul on 6 November. A policeman handcuffed her hands behind her back and, as he tried to force her into police vehicle, told her: “From now on, nothing will be the same as it was. We are going to teach you that.”Her arrest was prevented by fellow journalists who intervened. After being examined by a doctor, who said she had sustained wrist injuries, Kural said she would file a complaint against the police. The Reporters Without Borders Turkey representative, Erol Önderoglu, visited her the same day and publicly condemned her mistreatment at the hands of the police.—————–03.11.2015 – 71 Ipek Media Group journalists firedReporters Without Borders condemns the dismissal of 71 Ipek Media Group journalists following the government’s forcible seizure of the group at the end of last month. On 3 November, 58 employees of Ipek Media Group-owned outlets Bugün TV, Kanaltürk, Bugün and Millet were turned back at a police checkpoint when they arrived for work in Istanbul. Thirteen Ankara-based colleagues learned they had been fired in the evening.Interrupted when the police raided them on 28 October, the operations of these opposition media resumed the next day with a new, pro-government line after the management was replaced by government allies and the journalists were placed on forced leave. Some of their journalists have launched two new dailies, Özgür Bugün and Özgür Millet.“This continuing purge of critical news media in the wake of the parliamentary elections bodes ill for the future of media freedom in Turkey,” said Johann Bihr, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk.———-03.11.2015 – Two opposition journalists jailedReporters Without Borders calls for the immediate release of Cevheri Güven, the publisher of the weekly Nokta, and Murat Capan, its editor. They were arrested last night on suspicion of “inciting criminal activity” in the wake of the parliamentary elections but an Istanbul court today ordered them held on the more serious charge of “inciting armed revolt against the government.”Their arrests were prompted by the weekly’s latest issue (Issue No. 24), which had a photograph of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and a calendar on the front cover together with the headline: “Monday 2 November, start of civil war in Turkey.” The police have seized all available copies and Nokta’s website has been blocked.Highlighting the absurdity of the charges, the journalists said the issue was sent to the printers on 30 October, two days before the 1 November parliamentary elections. The cover did not, therefore, refer to the elections results, which have surprised most observers, but to the polarization in Turkey in the run-up to the elections.The arrests of Güven and Capan have brought to five the number of pro-Gülen Movement journalists now detained. The others are Hidayet Karaca, Mehmet Baransu and Gültekin Avci. Capan is also being investigated in connection with an earlier cover in September said to have “insulted the president.”(Photo: Ozan Kose / AFP) Follow the news on Turkey November 9, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Timeline of censorship in Turkey News Help by sharing this information Organisation center_img Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit April 28, 2021 Find out more News April 2, 2021 Find out more April 2, 2021 Find out more RSF_en TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism lawlast_img read more

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FDA says firm sold peanut products before test results

first_imgFeb 9, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Federal officials recently amended their inspection report on the peanut processing plant tied to the current nationwide Salmonella outbreak to say that in a number of cases the company shipped products before getting test results, rather than after getting conflicting results on successive tests. “The actions of PCA indicate that the company lacks business integrity and business honesty, which seriously and directly hinders its ability to do business with the federal government,” David Shipman, acting administrator of USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service, said in the statement. All the product lots mentioned in the report tested positive for Salmonella at some point, the FDA said in its latest update on the Salmonella investigation. The amended report, called an FDA-483, shows numerous cases in which PCA ordered tests of peanut products but then released one or more shipments before receiving the test results. The report also says that on Jul 18 and 24, 2007, the company released shipments of chopped peanuts “on or after the positive Salmonella results were obtained.” Feb 5 USDA news release about suspending business with PCA Products from the Blakely plant were mainly sold to institutions and food services and to other food processing firms, not to retail outlets. But yesterday PCA released a list of products that were produced in 2007 and are subject to the recall. They consist of peanuts sold in cans under the names Casey’s, Parnell’s Pride, Reggie, and Robinson Crusoe. But on Feb 5 the FDA released an amended inspection report showing that in many of these cases, the company had shipped products before receiving any test result. The report still notes two cases, on Jul 18 and 24, 2007, in which PCA shipped products that had tested positive. All of the cases covered in the FDA inspection report are classified as failures to manufacture under conditions needed to minimize the potential for growth of microorganisms. Products cited in the report include peanut paste, peanut butter, peanut meal, chopped peanuts, peanut granules, and oil-roasted peanuts. See also: FDA amends inspection reportFDA officials spent more than 2 weeks inspecting the Blakely plant in January after testing of peanut butter in Minnesota and Connecticut tied the facility to the outbreak. The inspections led to the FDA’s initial report of cases in which products tested positive for Salmonella initially but were shipped after a second test found no contamination. “It is important to note that for all lots identified in the FDA-483 (original and amended), the firm received positive Salmonella test results for the products shipped,” the FDA update states. “For example, in some situations the firm received a positive Salmonella test result, followed by a later negative result, and then shipped the products. FDA update on investigationhttp://www.fda.gov/oc/opacom/hottopics/salmonellatyph.htmlcenter_img The suspension will be in effect for a year, but the agency is proposing to extend it to 3 years, the statement said. It covers PCA and its subsidiary, Tidewater Blanching LLC. The company has 30 days to submit information opposing the suspension. The company said it has not sold any products in cans and jars since 2007. It said it was releasing the product list to help any consumers who might still have them on hand. The firm said it had received no reports of illnesses related to the products. “Effective immediately, PCA is excluded from participating in government contracts or subcontracts, as well as federal nonprocurement programs,” the USDA said in a Feb 5 statement. In its latest update on the investigation, the FDA said the finding that PCA had shipped products after successive positive and negative Salmonella tests was based on statements from the firm’s management. But a more detailed review of documents provided during the inspection indicated that some of the information supplied by the managers did not match up with the documents, the agency said. FDA’s list of products recalled because of the outbreakhttp://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/peanutbutterrecall/index.cfm USDA suspends firmIn other developments, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently announced it was barring PCA from doing business with the federal government for at least a year. Last week it was reported that PCA products had been used by USDA-supported school lunch programs in California, Idaho, and Minnesota. On Jan 28, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported 12 instances in which the Peanut Corp. of America (PCA) shipped peanut products from its Blakely, Ga., plant after getting an initial positive Salmonella test and then getting a negative result on a second test. “In some other situations, the firm shipped the products before it had received the positive test results. For these, sometimes the firms received a subsequent negative test, and sometimes no additional testing appears to have been done.” Contamination at the Blakely plant is blamed for an outbreak involving 575 cases in 43 states, plus one in Canada, and for probably contributing to eight deaths. As of yesterday, the FDA said 1,790 peanut-containing products had been recalled because of the outbreak. The Washington Post reported on Feb 6 that PCA had sold 32 truckloads of roasted peanuts and peanut butter to the government for its free school-lunch program for poor children. Schools in California, Idaho, and Minnesota received the products from January to November 2007, a USDA official told the Post.last_img read more

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Rwanda uses drones for good

first_imgDespite a reputation more for combat and commercial applications, drone technology can offer constructive and positive uses to the world, especially to Africa. Various drone projects are being used for meteorological research, environmental and animal conservation and, in particular, healthcare support.A new drone delivery venture between the Rwandan health department and an American technology company is bringing the country’s rural and urban regions closer together.Drone technology was originally developed by the US military for unmanned combat. Zipline, an American technology company made up of former innovators from SpaceX, Google and aircraft developer Lockheed Martin, has modified the technology as a transport delivery system. The Silicon Valley company has partnered with the Rwandan government to trial a system that delivers medical equipment, primarily blood supplies, to the country’s western rural areas.“The inability to deliver lifesaving medicines to the people who need them the most causes millions of preventable deaths each year around the world,” Zipline CEO Keller Rinaudo said in a launch statement: “This instant delivery system… allows medicine to be delivered on-demand and at low-cost, anywhere.“The company not only builds and supplies the unmanned aircraft but also trains Rwandan pilots in using the drones to transport resources from urban hospitals to remote clinics across the country. It is expected to be particularly useful during the country’s rainy season, when ground delivery of supplies proves the most difficult.According to Zipline, the drones are able to travel up to 150 kilometres, with a payload of one to two kilograms.President Kagame launching a Zipline medical delivery drone now in Muhanga #Rwanda pic.twitter.com/D9rHG4WlN4— Presidency | Rwanda (@UrugwiroVillage) October 14, 2016Rwandan President Paul Kagame called the system a “milestone” for Rwanda and Africa at the project’s official launch and the first successful delivery in October 2016.The fixed-wing drones are flown automatically via GPS positioning over a predetermined course, taking into account weather and geographical conditions. Flying well below commercial airspace, the drone then releases its payload, which is parachuted into a pick-up zone without the need to land.Currently, the project uses 15 drones, operating around the clock, delivering vital blood products, including plasma and coagulants, to 21 rural clinics.Both the company and the Rwandan government hope to improve on the pilot project, experimenting with larger payloads and longer distances, as well creating job opportunities for the manufacturing and maintenance of drone equipment, and even a drone pilot-training project.Source: BBC NewsSouthAfrica.info reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

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Ventilation for Your Tight House — Part 2

first_imgOur conversation with Sonia Barrantes continues. (If you missed it, here is a link to Ventilation for Your Tight House — Part 1.)We’ve come to realize that we all want simple rules of thumb to guide our design process. Unfortunately, there isn’t a rule of thumb for everything and we’re going to have to rely on some common sense, good advice, and good old-fashioned engineering to get this balanced ventilation system right.Our cocktails are refreshed and we’re ready to go.The highlights:Hot products on the market. We talk about some examples of the latest ERV equipment out there, our experience with them and our excitement about the ones we haven’t tried yet (Lunos, CERV, Air Pohoda, Zehnder).Demand control ventilation. A feature that is new to the ERV market. These guys know when you need more fresh air and when you don’t.How many cfm? Sonia enlightens us on her rules of thumb for providing quantitative ventilation.Continuous commissioning. Is the system you installed really performing as it should?Maintaining balance. What do you do when the Viking range hood kicks on? How do we handle the imbalance? Sonia enlightens us.A six-digit idea. Can’t we have residential dryers that exhaust and supply directly with the outside air?When should you hire a mechanical engineer? Sonia shares the idea that perhaps there are levels of service that an engineer can provide that are tailored to your needs.Multifamily buildings. When the scale increases, how do we adapt these same ideas? Autonomous units or a consolidated system?As always, Phil leaves us with a song that you should be listening to in studio. For this episode he chose one that everyone on your block will listen to when you play it: “Dimed Out” by Titus Andronicus.Thanks for tuning in. Cheers! Subscribe to Green Architects’ Lounge on iTunes— you’ll never miss a show, and it’s free!RELATED CONTENT PODCAST: Ventilation for Your Tight House — Part 1POSTCAST: Don’t Be an Air Hole! — Part 1PODCAST: How to Choose The Right Mechanical SystemPODCAST: The Green Architects Chat with Allison BailesPODCAST: Net-Zero-Energy Homes, Part 1: Concepts and Basics Designing a Good Ventilation SystemHRV or ERV?A Balanced Ventilation System With a Built-In Heat PumpA ‘Magic Box’ For Your PassivhausAre HRVs Cost-Effective?Makeup Air for Range HoodsVentilation Doesn’t Happen in a VacuumBalanced Ventilation Is Appropriate for All Climatescenter_img TRANSCRIPTChris: Hey, welcome back everybody! This is the Green Architects’ Lounge. This is probably Part Two of the Ventilation podcast.Phil: It definitely is Part Two.Chris: All right. It’s definitely Part Two. We’ve re-freshened our drinks, we’re back at it, we’ve got Sonia Barrantes… (I’m sorry!)Phil: Barrantes!Chris: Barrantes.Phil: Is that too much of a roll?Sonia: No, that’s great.Chris: Barrantes. Barrantes. Barrantes. Right.So, Sonia — now, let’s see — we’ve covered HRVs, ERVs, whatever… Oh, we were going to talk about different kinds of ERVs and HRVs. Do you want to do that before we get into anything else?Phil: Yeah, let’s talk a little bit about that.Chris: Off-mike, we started talking about all the different products we know. Phil, you started with the Lunos.Phil: But, I mean, just to generalize: some of the products that we typically spec…Chris: Yeah.Phil: Sonia mentioned a product called Zehnder – which is a favorite. [See Image #2, below.] It’s a favorite of the Passive House crowd, because it’s high efficiency and low energy. Energy efficiency is a big deal.Chris: And they’ll come out and commission it themselves. You know, Zehnder will come out, and you can get a high level of confidence with that.Sonia: They also do designs. So, if you send them your floor plans…Chris: Right!Sonia: …they will locate supply and exhaust…Chris: So you don’t need an engineer!Sonia: …with their rainbow vision, they will place everything for you.Chris: Exactly.Phil: They’re not the cheapest system.Chris: Nooooo.Sonia: Nope.Chris: But you know, you get…Phil: Well, put it this way: they’re not the cheapest system, but they are the most expensive.[Laughter]Chris: Well said. Well said. And there’s a slew of others, from Venmar to…Phil: Venmar is a really good system – we use that a lot. And it’s got pretty low energy.Sonia: RenewAire is good.Chris: RenewAire. Is UltimateAir – is that one? There, that was one.Sonia: There’s also Fantech.Phil: Fantech is more affordable, higher loads.Chris: American Standard has some.Sonia: Nah.Chris: [He laughs.] Enough said!Sonia: Yes.Chris: They’re not the most expensive.Sonia: No.Chris: There you go.Phil: There are a few, fairly new players on the market. Air Pohoda is one. [See Image #1 at the top of the page.] Chris, you’ve just specified that recently.Chris: Yeah. I’m kind of excited about this, Phil. So, Air Pohoda is a pretty cool device. It’s bigger than your other ones. [See Image #3, below]. So, hey architects: you’d better plan for that.Phil: Bigger is better.Chris: Bigger is better, that’s what I’ve…Sonia: That’s what she said.[Laughter]Chris: I’m so glad you said that, Sonia.But, like a Zehnder, the main trunks of supply and return come off the unit and they go to a manifold and then are dispersed in little Zehnder-like tubes, which are — my rule-of-thumb — (we’ll talk about rule-of-thumbs later but) — I always have 12 cfm per tube. That’s just stuck in my head – tell me if I’m wrong later.Sonia: That is correct.Chris: All right, yeah. Sweet! But, the cool part about this unit is that it’s got these baffles in it.You’re going to talk about the Lunos probably in a little bit, where it reverses the flow of the air. So, one of the problems that you have (let’s just pick a Venmar, you know, your typical Venmar unit): if it’s zero degrees outside and it’s been running for a while, well that core is going to get cold, very cold – in fact it’s going to freeze up on you. And the unit detects that and so it runs in recirculation mode. It shuts off its connection to the outside and just recirculates interior air through the core until it thaws out. That’s a little bit of an energy loss in having that.The Air Pohoda has this very complex series of baffles within the core so it will actually reverse the flow of air through the core without reversing the supply and return in the house. So, it will – without you knowing it – it will just switch direction through the core to keep it the right temperature. So it can operate continuously down to super, super cold temperatures. It also has different filters in it. If you imagine an HRV filter as being something impermeable, like metal – a bunch of metal straws put together so close that they are imparting their heat on one another. And in an ERV, that filter is like Tyvek, you know, where that moisture…Sonia: It’s a heat exchange, although not a filter.Chris: A heat exchange! Thank you, Professor. Doctor.[Laughter]And so the Air Pohoda has both of these. It knows the relative humidity of the air going in, going out, and coming in from the house and being supplied to the house and it will switch to an HRV filter or an ERV filter. It will switch direction as it sees it and it will link to your sleek new iPad Touch device that you can go in and check on it whenever you want.So, yeah. It’s really neat.Phil: It’s not cheap.Chris: It’s not cheap. And it’s from the Czech Republic.Phil: Efficiency-wise, isn’t it like a 96% efficiency?Chris: Well, yeah. It’s one of those classic sliding scales. It depends on which test you look at. Basically, we’re seeing it – it’s definitely 90+. But, you know, in the last house that we just did – and it’s the one and only install I’ve ever done of it – the low end is low. A little too low. We need to bump it up. But the cool part is that the software – you can just tweak it (I could tweak it if I wanted, which is scary!). You know, it’s not that simple. I shouldn’t say it’s that simple. You need to know what you’re doing. But, there you go. Air Pohoda — boom!Phil: So there’s this other new product – it’s called the CERV – Conditioning Energy Recovery Ventilator?Chris: Right, which is exciting!Phil: It’s super-exciting; it’s the magic box that they’ve had overseas for years. It’s kind of like a first chance that us Americans have had to use something like this. And honestly, I don’t know that much about it. I’ve talked about using it with another builder. They’ve only sold about 50 units so far.It essentially uses an air-source heat pump. And it can provide conditioning up to about 8,000 BTUs – which is cooling to about 5,000.Chris: That’s sizable for your Passive House – if you’re in a tight house – especially in our cold climate. Geez! That’s all you would need.Sonia: So that’s like the American version of the Nilan.Phil: Right. Right. Right.Chris: Nice. And we’ll put a link to that, because there’s an article in GBA… right? We’ll put that on the side. Check out the side over there.Phil: It’s very interesting, because it basically modulates itself. It can turn on and off when it decides that you need fresh air. It can also detect contaminants in the air.Chris: No way!Phil: Yeah.Sonia: From high-pollution events?Phil: Yeah.Chris: From high-pollution events. Is that what you just said?Phil: Yeah. So, stay tuned for this. It’s pretty interesting. Right now they’re not super-cheap – I think it’s about eight to ten grand or so for an install.Chris: But, that’s like a Zehnder, though.Sonia: A little more.Chris: A little more than a Zehnder.Phil: A little more, but this one has conditioning.Chris: Right, exactly.Phil: So, it’s just another one that’s coming on. People are thinking about this stuff and there are some better answers out there on their way.Sonia: Is that demand-controlled ventilation (because you said it turns on and off as you need it)? So, demand-controlled ventilation (I forgot) in my ideal…Chris: Yeah?Sonia: …it would have that. So, basically you’d have a CO2 monitor somewhere in the house. And what it could do is – and Zehnder will do this (actually anything that takes an input signal) – as the carbon dioxide goes up — you have a party; Phil’s making drinks…Phil: That happens.Sonia: It ramps up your ventilation. And then, everybody leaves and the carbon dioxide levels come down, and it ramps the ventilation down. So, demand-control ventilation is really…Chris: Cool.Sonia: …really cool.Phil: From Green Building Advisor: “By all accounts, the CERV solves a lot of problems without using much energy. It provides balanced ventilation. It is smart enough to stop ventilating when the indoor air is clean. It increases the ventilation rate when the CO2 level rises — for example, when there are 20 people in the house for a party” — Thank you, Sonia. You’re reading Martin Holladay’s mind, here — “and decreases the ventilation rate when the CO2 level falls — for example, when the house is unoccupied.” Smart.Chris: Smart. Man, the future’s bright, Phil and Sonia! It’s going to be great.Phil: We’re going to talk about the Lunos. [See Image #4, below.] Sonia, what can you tell us about the Lunos?Sonia: The Lunos is… basically, they’re paired ceramic core fans – so they’re great for retrofit because you can just put them right through the wall (there’s no ductwork) – and what happens is they take turns. So, one sucks, the other blows. And as you’re exhausting air, it heats up the ceramic core and then it reverses direction and the air comes in and the ceramic core…Chris: Yes?Sonia: …discharges its heat to that air. So, they tend to be fairly expensive for the cfm…Phil: Mm-hmm.Sonia: …but in the right application where you don’t have room to run ductwork, or it’s a retrofit like we’ve talked about.Chris: Right.Sonia: So, 15 (I think we said, Phil: 20 cfm?)Phil: 15-20, yup.Sonia: So, in an average-sized house (let’s say 2,500 square feet) with three bedrooms, you need about 105 cfm. And you said it’s about $1,000 per pair.Phil: Right.Sonia: So, it’s starting to get up to the level of a Zehnder.Phil: Right. But then, you talk about no ductwork.Sonia: No ductwork.Phil: A grand, and you poke it through a few holes in the wall.Chris: There could be some times where you really need to ventilate a space that you can’t get ductwork to, and that might be a way to do it.Phil: I know.Sonia: And it could be great for a room-by-room (you know, a bonus room or something like that) where you don’t want to run ductwork.Chris: And that was a great segue to talking about: How much ventilation do you supply to your people or spaces, because you just rattled off a real quick (dare I say) rule of thumb?Sonia: I had some cheat sheets.[Laughter]Chris: All right. Sonia, what’s your rule of thumb for deciding “how much cfm do I supply?” How do I know what to do?Sonia: Well, I start with the code. So, for ASHRAE it’s the number of bedrooms plus one is the number of people, and a certain cfm per person, and then cfm per square foot. So I just rattled off that rule of thumb, but I’ve got some numbers. So, a 2,500 square foot house with three bedrooms is 105 cfm. A 1,000 square foot house with two bedrooms is 53 cfm. So you can kind of see the levels. And this is for fresh air coming into the house.Chris: Right. And this is continuous?Sonia: Continuous fresh air.Chris: Right. Right.Sonia: And the thing to remember though, is: there’s the spirit, again, and then there’s the letter.Chris: Right.Sonia: So, if I wanted, I could put a closet in my house and bring in 105 cfm and exhaust that out of that closet and technically I’m bringing in the right amount of supply air into my house.Chris: Wow. That is awful.[Laughter]Sonia: It’s awful. It’s not getting to my occupants. So, when we’re talking about the mixing and Rob Aldrich, these are the things that we as architects and engineers need to make that we’re considering — that it’s not just “Oh, I’ve brought 105 cfm into the house.” Rather, it’s “where I brought it in and did it mix and is it going to be cold on my occupants.”Chris: Right. “Is it the right thing to do?”Sonia: Right. Because if it’s uncomfortable, they’re going to turn it off.Chris: Yeah. And they’re going to call us and complain.Sonia: Right.Chris: And we’ll have to explain ourselves.Phil: Yeah, it’s a good question: how many times do people install HRVs or ERVs and they just get turned off because they make a lot of noise or, if it’s the summertime, they turn it off and they forget to turn it back on when they close the windows.Chris: Right. Or, I don’t know if you’ve ever (I’m sure you have, Phil) gone back and done some form of commissioning one way or another on a house, and… Like this last house with Air Pohoda I just mentioned, we learned, “Oh, we need to turn this thing up. You know? It’s not supplying what we thought it would. It just needs to be tweaked a little” – which is great if the unit can handle that.How many times – I think about in the past – I have several houses where we installed an ERV, patted ourselves on the back (“Good job!”) and, you know, we followed the plan. But did we go back and do a Duct-Blaster thing; did we figure out exactly what the flow is out of each one of these ports going in and out of the unit? No. So… yeah? Is it okay? Probably.Phil: Yeah, we’ve done that. Do you know how many times we’ve done that? Once.Chris: Once?Phil: Once. That’s the honest truth. We rely on the folks doing the right thing.Chris: That’s awesome!Phil: But we don’t really know if they are doing that.Sonia: How did it turn out when you went back and checked?Phil: Pretty good. We did pretty good.Chris: Pretty good — but you made an adjustment maybe?Phil: We made a couple of adjustments.Chris: Yeah. So, I mean — I’m just throwing it out there. It’s a good thing to do. It’s a learning experience, especially when the numbers are lower than you thought — significantly, in a couple of places. You say, “Woah! What happened here?”Sonia: Well, it’s really… I mean, it’s going to be a cultural change… right? So right now, you get your furnace checked every year.Chris: Yeah, right.Sonia: Well, eventually it might be that once a year, your HVAC specialist comes and checks the balance on your system. It’s called “continuous commissioning.”Chris: Wow.Sonia: You never stop checking on it.Phil: Mm-hmm. But there’s got to be a fear factor involved to inspire people to do it. It’s either going to cost them money or health. Otherwise — “Eh, it’s fine.”Chris: Or comfort. But that’s probably not going to happen.Phil: No, I think they’ll be less attuned to comfort.Chris: Yeah.Sonia: Well interestingly — again, Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, in their study, they found that the health-related deaths due to air quality rivals traffic accidents and infectious diseases.Chris: No!Phil: Are you serious?Sonia: Totally.Chris: Wow!Sonia: Those guys don’t lie.Phil: Wow!Sonia: They’re serious nerds, so…Chris: Well, I think that was the fact of the podcast right there.Phil: Yeah. Scared straight!Chris: Scared straight.Phil: Commission your HRV.Chris: Yeah. And install them.Sonia: Install it.[Laughter]Phil: Install it in the first place. How about that?Chris: Great. Let’s talk about this balanced system. Sonia, I’ve got this great house, and it’s airtight, and then I’ve got this awesome Zehnder / Air Pohoda system. And then I walk over to my 1600 cfm Viking range hood and I turn that sucker on and my eardrums pop. What do we do? How do we handle makeup air? How do we handle the imbalance that we, as users, put on this?Sonia: Well the first thing I would do, as an architect, is try to convince my client that they do not actually need 1600 cfm.Chris: Amen.Sonia: Then if you lose that battle, by code, if you’re exhausting more than 400 cfm on your range hood, you have to provide a dedicated makeup air system that is actually interlocked with your range hood. So, that means when your range hood turns on, the makeup air system comes on. That’s from the International Mechanical Code 2009, so the International Energy Conservation Code 2009 also says that the mandatory [maximum] airtightness at 50 pascals is… anyone want to guess?Chris: Three!Sonia: Seven.Phil: Seven!Sonia: So, at 400 cfm at a 7 ach50 house is where you have to put in makeup air…Chris: Dang!Sonia: Well, now we have a 0.6 or a 1.0 ach50 house, I think, logically, you can understand that it’s going to be much less than 400 cfm where you have to worry about makeup air. And I think, later we’re going to talk about all the bad things that can happen when you negatively pressurize your house.Chris: Right. Well, I think we’re there now.Sonia: Really?Chris: Yeah, let’s do it. Yeah, so let’s say that happens. I mean, it is very easy to find a range hood that goes 300, 500, 900, 600 cfm. Easy as pie.Phil: Right. Especially if you’re putting a range over an island…Chris: Oh yeah.Phil: It’s going to suck from all sides.Chris: Oh yeah. So let’s talk about it now.Sonia: Range hoods kind of get amped up about it. Right?Chris: Well, yeah.Sonia: So here’s the thing: if you’re cooking with a gas range top, you need to exhaust to the outside.Chris: Right.Sonia: So this whole “Passive House recirc’ing range hoods exhausting from the kitchen” – if you have a gas range, you need to exhaust to the outside. (That’s because of all the nasty stuff that comes from combustion products of gas.)Chris: Right. So, boom!Phil: Don’t screw around.Chris: Right. Even if you’re not even on this blog (energy-efficient in mind) and you just have a gas…Sonia: Right. You need to direct-vent to the outside. So now if you have a tight house – whether or not you have a balanced ventilation system – you need a makeup air system that is separate from that. Right?Chris: Gotcha.Sonia: You can get away with, typically – so you need a minimum of 100 cfm – even in a tight house you can probably get away without using a direct vent. Passive House, you’re on the line.Chris: Right.Sonia: So 100, 150 — you’re probably okay. Once you start talking the 300 cfm fans need to really look at it. I actually had a friend, Andrew Calise — you might know him — Strategic Energy Group?Chris: Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, sure.Sonia: So he’s blower-door testing a development in the greater Portland area and he came to me and said, “These houses are so tight.” And they not Passive Houses, they’re just…Chris: Tight.Sonia: They’re just tight. He’s concerned that they’re not getting the natural ventilation. So we go in there and we’re doing a walk-around and I see that they have gas fireplaces, and I was like…Chris: Woah!Sonia: So they’re going with exhaust-only.Phil: Mm-hmm.Sonia: So, I helped him calculate – based on the tightness of the house – what they should set the exhaust-only bathroom fan to make sure they’re getting their required ventilation. Then I see this gas fireplace and I say, “Wait a second. We have this continuous, exhaust-only fan and let’s say they put in a 600 cfm range hood (or a 300 cfm range hood)…Phil: Mm-hmm.Chris: Oh man!Sonia: So you have to think about that. So I asked him to run the blower-door and negatively pressurize the house equivalent to what the possible cfm could be…Chris: Right.Sonia: And then read the negative pressurization. So, put 350 cfm out the blower door and then see what your pressure in the house is. And so, there are different ranges for if you have a closed combustion — so, if you have a natural gas water heater that gets its air from the outside and it’s piped to the water heater…Chris: It’s closed. Right.Sonia: It’s closed, so you can go fairly negative.Chris: Hmmm.Sonia: If you have an open-combustion appliance (which could be a fireplace or a wood stove, anything like that), you can’t go much more than 5 pascals before you’re looking at potentially backdrafting very nasty stuff into the house.Chris: And 5 pascals is, I mean, I’m just winging it…Sonia: It’s not hard.Chris: That’s like… you can get 5 pascals at like, maybe 70 cfm?Sonia: It depends how tight your house is.Chris: Yeah. I mean, that’s easy. In that scenario, what would be a solution? This kitchen hood exhaust, let’s say it cranks at 150 cfm (which is a respectable cfm). But if you’ve got a gas fireplace over there, then you’re going to say, maybe you should put in a vent with a damper that’s actuated when this thing goes on.Phil: My sense is you’re not going to like the “just crack a window” idea.Sonia: Right. Well, I mean, you can do that. But the one thing you can’t control is occupant behavior — right?Chris: Right.Sonia: So, the first owner might be like, “Don’t worry about it. I’ll crack a window every time.” But then, the next owner may not. This is actually – if I were forcing the situation – I might put in a trickle vent. Right? Do you agree?Chris: Mm-hmm. Yeah. Yeah.Phil: Mm-hmm.Sonia: And once you get above certain cfm’s you actually have to power the air in… right?Chris: Mm-hmm.Sonia: So sometimes people bring the air in the basements…Chris: Yup, that’s right.Sonia: So it mixes before it comes up. All I can say is the way you solve the problem — you have lots of ways to solve the problem, but you have to be aware that is a problem.Chris: Yeah.Sonia: That could be a problem. So, you’re building super-tight houses; you know, there’s the Viking range hood; 1200 cfm; 300 cfm. You need to think about it.Chris: Right.Phil: There’s a very simple answer to this.Chris: Don’t put them in.Phil. Yeah. Just eat out every night.[Laughter]Phil: Or order in.Chris: Is that what you do?Phil: Order in is okay, too.Chris: Yeah. Stop cooking!Phil: That’s what the Germans do.Sonia: Well, now you can go to the electric cooktop.Chris: Yeah, exactly. I was going to say…Sonia: There’s still some products, but you put a recirc’ing range hood, you get the grease and the smoke out, and then you let your balanced ventilation system…Chris: Handle the rest.Sonia: …handle the rest.Chris: And that’s a great Passive House strategy.Phil: Right. I mean, do Passive Houses use gas to cook?Chris: No! No. Absolutely not.Phil: Right. So you just don’t see it.Chris: Does not happen.Sonia: So, if someone has their heart set on a gas cooktop, you need to direct-vent and you just need to behave appropriately.Chris: So, I was at a conference – I think it was the Passive House North America conference – and I forget who was talking, but they referenced a guy from Zehnder who was in the room who had this idea. Maybe you were there?Sonia: Probably Aubrey Gewehr, maybe?Chris: May have been, may have been.Sonia: I don’t know if I’m butchering that phonetically.Chris: Maybe. But whoever this genius was, he came up with the idea of taking one of those downdraft ranges (you know, the Jenn Air whatevers) and just hacking that. Using that same ductwork, he put an actuator on it and just made it so when the hood goes on, the actuator opens. So, the air comes out – whoom! – right there. The makeup air is coming into the house at the Jenn Air location right next to the burners, so it just goes right under the cook surface and…Sonia: So it just cools your food off as you’re cooking.Chris: Right!Phil: I’m pretty sure that there’s a product…Chris: There should be!Phil: …that Zehnder makes that’s not available here.Chris: Oh yeah?Phil: Yeah. I know a little bit about it.Chris: Oh, you’re saying this like you’re…Sonia: …being so coy![Laughter]He’s being coy about a fan.Chris: I think he is! Well, Phil is “in the know” with the Zehnder higher-ups.Phil: That’s all I can say at the moment.Chris: He’s in the inner circle. Well, you don’t have to share with us. I’ll turn off the mike and you can tell me all about this…Phil: Okay, I will.Chris: …super-secret product.Phil: Perhaps. Perhaps.Chris: That’s fantastic. Yeah, and while I’m on it, I have a “hot zig” or a six-digit idea – which we have every once in a while.Phil: Zig away!Chris: It’s probably a hot zig, because I don’t think you could make six digits off something like this. No! You know what? It’s a six-digit idea for the first company like GE or Whirlpool or one of those guys. I mean, how simple would it be – you’ve got a dryer that exhausts – why not have a dryer that also supplies and exhausts to the outside? I mean, it’s just its own contained air unit, so you turn it on and it doesn’t affect your envelope — your air volume. You can seal the ductwork and just, it’s its own thing. Wouldn’t that be genius?Phil: That doesn’t exist?Chris: No!Phil: It feels like it should.Sonia: It exists on the commercial.Chris: Does it?Sonia: Yeah.Chris: Oh, all right.Phil: And is somebody making six digits from it?Sonia: I’m sure they’re making six digits on it.Chris: All of my six-digit ideas are already…Phil: So you’re talking about, essentially like, a sealed wood stove or a sealed fireplace…Chris: Yeah, why not a sealed dryer?Phil: …that has an outside air intake.Chris: Yeah. I’ve had a number of residential projects where it’s time to choose the dryer. “What dryer should I choose?” — and, you know, there’s always a certain number of cfm that that thing is going to eject from your house.Sonia: I’m actually super-excited because Jake found a heat-pump dryer. Have you heard of these?Chris: Oh yes!Phil: Yeah.Sonia: It won a technology award last year.Chris: Nice!Phil: I heard they’re pretty cool, but they take a really long time to dry.Sonia: Well, the condensing dryers definitely take a long time to dry.Chris: This is different.Sonia: I think the heat pump is different.Phil: Oh, okay!Chris: I’m very excited to hear about that.Sonia: I listened to your Allison Bailes podcast…Chris: Yes, yes.Sonia: …and I almost drove off the road, I was so excited because he mentioned the second law of thermodynamics which happens to be a favorite of mine as well.[Laughter]Sonia: So, as soon as I get some free time, I’m going to look at that from a second-law point of view…Chris: Nice!Sonia: …because, if you’re stealing heat from your Passive House to dry your clothes, then it’s not necessarily a good thing. But the potential is really there.Chris: Right. We must have been talking about my cold-climate refrigerator idea at that point.Phil: Yeah, right.Sonia: I don’t know. I’m not sure.Chris: That’s all right. We won’t go into that. Later, you guys will have to plow through the archives to find that idea. But anyway…Phil: You have a question right here, Chris: “Wood stoves and fireplaces – are we still doing those?”Sonia: We are.Chris: Yeah, we’ve got clients who want them, and I’m in that position where we are heavily persuading them not to when it’s a super-tight house.Sonia: Have you been successful?Phil: Well, we’re going to fight here.Sonia: Because, I’ve lost that fight.Chris: Well, I’ve lost that fight.Phil: Why say no? They’re wonderful things.Chris: I feel like we’ve had this conversation on the podcast before.Phil: It’s such a great elemental thing to have a fire in your house.Chris: Yeah, I am a caveman inside and I want a fire.Sonia: A caveman with gray hair.Chris: Yeah.Phil: Yeah.Sonia: Yeah.Chris: Yeah, thank you.Phil: Cavemen never got gray hair because they never lived that long – is that what you’re trying to say? Back in the day?Sonia: I just don’t think they had gel.Phil: Oh, okay.Chris: I think she said “great hair,” not “gray hair.”Sonia: Yeah — great hair.Chris: Thank you, Sonia.Sonia: You’re welcome.Chris: Up yours, Phil.[Laughter]Sonia: The thing to think about is, what are they building the house for?Chris: Right.Sonia: If they are telling me they are building an energy-efficient house and they put a fireplace in, I’d be like, “Well, it’s not energy-efficient, but if you want a fireplace, okay.”Chris: Right.Sonia: So, Zehnder – once again, I’m partial to Zehnder – they have what’s called a “fireplace protection mode.”Chris: Wow!Sonia: So, what happens is: if your fireplace starts to negatively pressurize your house (because it is pulling combustion air)…Chris: Right, it’s drafting.Sonia: …the Zehnder will stop sucking air out of the house.Phil: Really?Sonia: It does some magic thing and basically you tell the Zehnder on the control panel that you, in fact, have a fireplace or a wood stove and it will monitor the pressurization of the house and it will stop sucking. [Editor’s note: This description by Sonia Barrantes isn’t quite technically accurate. For further information on this issue, see Comment #1 by John Rockwell on this GBA page.]Phil: I think that’s pretty brilliant!Chris: I think that’s the second biggest fact of the podcast right there.Phil: That’s great.Chris: That’s nice.Phil: That’s a five-digit idea, at least.Chris: Oh yeah, at least! So, that’s wonderful to know, and I wonder if other ERVs will pick up on that.Sonia: And I don’t know that other ones don’t. I just know that Zehnder does.Chris: Right. So what do you think the cfm output of a fireplace is? I bet somewhere in the archives at GBA, someone brilliant has said that. Martin probably knows. If he were here… [Editor’s note: an open wood-burning fireplace consumes between 200 and 600 cfm of room air.]Phil: He knows everything.Chris: Yeah. But, again, there’s another point where we have to provide makeup air usually. But you’re thinking you can use the Zehnder?Sonia: Oh I’m not saying you can use the Zehnder to provide the makeup air, because it’s balanced ventilation — so, by definition, it doesn’t provide makeup air. Right?.Chris: Interesting. Well see, I thought – okay, this is a great conversation! – ERVs can go out of balance to a certain degree (which, I thought the rule of thumb was half of their rated cfm). So, if I am running the dryer, if the dryer is ejecting at 50 cfm, then my ERV can probably handle that (it’s just supplying more than it itself is exhausting.). It is using the dryer to do that exhaust so, its efficiency is going to go down. The air is going to be closer to the outdoor temperature as that happens. So, a dryer is not as crucial if your ERV can handle that bump. But, if I am running the dryer and I turn on the kitchen exhaust or and I have a fire in the fireplace, then I might be 150, 200, 300 cfm and that may be beyond the entire capacity of the ERV. So, you need makeup air for those things.Sonia: I don’t know off the top of my head what the limits are for the ERV and, if you think about it, it is a hole through your wall.Chris: Yeah.Sonia: So, even if none of the fans are running, you have a direct connection to the outside.Chris: Right.Sonia: So, if you pull hard enough, you’ll probably be able to pull makeup air through the ERV.Chris: Gotcha.Sonia: But, we shouldn’t design to that.Chris: Right. Right. So, if we have a client – I have that client who says, “I want a wood stove; I’m going to have a wood stove. I have this wood lot. I want to (just whatever) — I want that caveman feeling of fire on these days.” Even though I say, “Well, you’re going to cook yourself out of your room, but that’s fine if you want to do that.”Sonia: In that case, I would probably consider some sort of makeup air damper that opens. You know, you could put a temperature sensor in the chimney…Chris: Oh!Sonia: …and when it gets above a certain temperature, it opens a damper. But, keep in mind that the more complex…Chris: Right.Sonia: …the more you have to maintain, and the more things break.Phil: Mm-hmm.Sonia: I might do something like that but, bring it into the house somewhere where it’s not going to be a direct draft on somebody.Chris: Right.Sonia: Somewhere where it can mix before it gets into the house.Phil: So, Sonia, at what point should someone hire a mechanical engineer?Chris: Ooh, that’s a good question!Phil: Do you need a mechanical engineer in the house?Sonia: That is a great question.Chris: Well, yeah. Because houses… I mean, if you and I were doing a commercial building, we’re hiring a mechanical engineer.Phil: Yeah, we’ve got to have one.Chris: It’s just way too much to handle. But tons of houses get built without…Phil: Yeah, most of them. And you know, Chris and I, we consider ourselves like we know what we’re doing for the most part, and we rarely hire mechanical engineers for houses.Chris: For houses.Sonia: We’re hiring Sonia for this bigger house that we’re doing right now. It’s very complicated, so we’re going to need her help. But it’s an interesting question: What’s that threshold? How often do you get hired? When do you recommend people hire you?Sonia: That is a great question. I think the first thing is it really depends on your team. So, if you as architects are really sharp – Kaplan Thompson and Briburn – and you guys are in this world — so you recognize when it gets beyond your comfort level. Right?Chris: Right.Sonia: If you have a really great contractor who can do the energy modeling and do the equipment sizing and do the distribution systems, and you have a good relationship, and they do good work (their ducts are sealed, things are installed correctly), then I would feel more comfortable going without a mechanical engineer. But, depending on the level of your team, and also we’re going through this paradigm change in the building industry…Chris: Right.Sonia: …where now, all of a sudden, mechanical ventilation is being put into residential homes (which we never did before) – especially up here. We don’t do forced air. Right?Chris: Yeah, right.Sonia: We have 4% openable windows and we’re good.Chris: Right.Sonia: So I think, as we’re going through this change, it would be more likely – and it could be a mechanical engineer who just helps you at the beginning: does some initial energy modeling, helps you with the equipment sizing, gives you some design tips to consider.Phil: Mm-hmm.Sonia: And then maybe checks in again later in the design to make sure everything looks pretty good. And then it goes out to bid and maybe the engineer even reviews the bids from the contractors.Chris: Nice.Sonia: So, I think it’s not necessarily like you get a full design – you don’t need a mechanical engineer to run all your ducts or anything like that – but they should just kind of look over your shoulder and raise red flags and help with some basic calculations.Chris: Nice! Good advice. All right, what else am I missing? Anything? What do you want to talk about, Phil?Phil: I know we talked mostly about houses, but what about multifamily?Chris: Right.Phil: How does the equation change here? It certainly gets more complicated. And for a lot of architects doing houses, the next step is starting to do a couple of…Chris: Larger, multifamily.Phil: Do the systems change dramatically?Sonia: They’d get bigger, potentially. Right? So, I mean, we can compartmentalize and we could put a single-family ventilation system in every apartment. But then Chris goes, “Holy [bleep], Sonia, look at all those building penetrations! That looks awful! And my amazing siding design is now compromised.”Chris: Right! Riddled.Sonia: Riddled. It looks awful.Chris: “Can we consolidate this and save some…?”Sonia: So, the things you get when you have a single-family system is you have boost mode. Right? So, when you have a high-pollution event in the bathroom…Chris: Yes?Sonia: …you can boost it. But, if I’m in a multifamily with a single unit that’s serving multiple homes, I don’t get that option, okay?Chris: Right.Sonia: Similarly, if I’m turning it down – so let’s say I have one apartment that’s full of kids and they’re cooking a lot of pasta.Chris: Yes.Sonia: And in the next apartment I have a single, slightly older person. Right?Chris: Yes.Sonia: Well, they all get the same ventilation rate. I mean, you could rebalance the system so that they get less. So either you turn down or turn up as a building and back down. And so those are things that you have to consider. I would say, on the balance, it makes sense to go with a consolidated system mostly for cost reasons. And then you just have to have a smart balancer and then – we talked about continuous commissioning – it really makes sense to go make and check it seasonally.Chris: Gotcha.Sonia: Or as tenants change.Chris: But if I had a developer or a client (or whatever, a combination of that) and they were adamant that, “No, everyone’s going to have their own autonomy. Each unit.” It’s a condo or something like that. Then that would behoove the architect to design the exterior.Sonia: Absolutely.Chris: So that these features, these penetrations are thought about.Sonia: Absolutely.Chris: And are not missing from the elevations.Sonia: And that’s a great point. If you have a homeowners’ association, if it’s a condo…Chris: True.Sonia: …who’s going to pay the electricity for the…?Chris: Right. It can get complicated.Sonia: It can get very complicated.Phil: Mm-hmm.Chris: That’s interesting. Do you think there’s greater efficiency overall – from a macro level, from an alien looking down at the planet, and looking at this one building saying, “What’s the better thing to do?”Sonia: Well, ironically, in almost any other case, with larger systems you get economies of scale. But I have found (in my relatively limited experience) that with the larger boxes, you get lower efficiency. So, I’m not going to get 92% on 1200 cfm anymore.Chris: Interesting. So, it might be more hardware, more product installed, but then it will each be at 90% as opposed to…Sonia: And so now, when you’re getting those lower efficiencies, you’re probably talking about some sort of duct-mounted coil…Chris: Mm-hmm.Sonia: …to condition the air (to heat it up or cool it down when it’s really cold outside) because you’re getting that “too cool” air.Chris: Gotcha. All right.Sonia: That would definitely be a time to bring in a mechanical engineer – if you’re going multifamily.Chris: Oh yeah. Oh yeah.Sonia: That would definitely be the right time.Chris: Oh yeah. If you’re an architect doing a multifamily without a mechanical engineer, “Phssssst!”Phil: Scared!Chris: Bush league![Laughter]You need to get your act together. We’re talking to you.All right. I don’t know. Phil, you feel good? Sonia, do you feel good?Sonia: I feel great! With another cocktail, I’ll feel better.Chris: Hey! We can help you out.[Laughter]Phil: I’ve got an idea: so let’s play a rocking song to close out the podcast.[The episode closes with a song by Titus Andronicus: “Dimed Out.”]last_img read more

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Revive Your Footage With Resolve 15’s Automatic Dirt Repair and Dust Buster Tools

first_imgMotion Estimation — You have four options: None, Faster, Normal, and Better. These will change the effect’s performance and quality.Neighbor Frames — This will let you choose how many frames the effect should reference when removing dirt. If you find the dirt lingers for more than a few frames, you should increase the amount. However, increasing this number will also increase the processing of the effect, which will cause slower machines to struggle.Repair Strength — Of course, the function is in the name. The default setting is 0.9 (with a 1.0 max). If you feel like Resolve has cleaned up too much dirt and the archival footage has lost its charm, you can reduce this number. The imperfections are part of the charm of archival footage. However, sometimes they can be a bit much. Resolve has the solution.There is a refined beauty to archival footage, despite how often it’s spoiled with wear, dirt, grain, and other imperfections. Historical footage can transport us back in time more effectively than ultra-sharp 4k recreations. However, there may be a time when you’re using older material, and the imperfections are severe enough that they are detracting from the viewing experience. Thankfully, In Resolve 15, there are two revival tools can help you fix this problem.If you tend to upgrade your software to the latest version without reading the patch notes (I’m guilty of this with all Adobe programs other than Premiere), then you may not know about two new features in Resolve 15: Automatic Dirt Removal and Dust Buster. The effects are incredibly easy to use — for both tools, and in most cases, it is simply a drag-and-drop operation. So, if you missed these new additions in the update, or are new to Resolve, you need to know what these tools can do.(Before we proceed, it’s worth noting that while the primary purpose of these effects is to revive and remaster older footage, you can, of course, also use them for an array of problems with modern footage.)Automatic Dirt RemovalBeforeAfterFirst, let’s look at what you can do when you have too much dirt in your clip. This isn’t necessarily a noise remover like Neat Video or Resolve’s built-in noise remover; it uses optical flow technology to remove and repair elements that temporarily appear over a frame or two. So, what does that mean? Well, it’s not going to remove features that consistently appear throughout the entire shot, such as a lens smudge or a consistent scratch (as in the example above). But for dust, hair, dirt, and any other unwanted elements that appear in the shot for only a frame or two, this is the tool for the job.As I mentioned, the Automatic Dirt Remover is ridiculously easy to use. You quite literally apply the effect to a node, and in most cases, that’s it. There are, however, a few sliders and drop-down menus you can use to enhance the quality of the effect.The first panel is your main controls. Here you can adjust how the dirt removal tool interacts with your footage. Dust BusterBefore (thick dirt mark on the left of the frame)AfterWhile you can use the Dust Buster on its own, it is primarily a backup to the Automatic Dirt Removal when that tool can’t remove the heavy imperfections from a clip. The primary difference is that you, the user, have to direct where you want Resolve to apply the Dust Buster. Similar to the Automatic Dirt Removal but with less horsepower, this tool is for imperfections that appear in just one frame. If the blemish lasts longer than a single frame, you’ll need to move through the clip frame by frame, drawing a box around the defect.You’ll find the Dust Buster in the same OpenFX panel category as the Automatic Dirt Removal. Once you find it, apply the effect to a new node. You need to make sure that the OpenFX icon is displayed in the drop-down menu below the viewer; otherwise, you’ll be unable to repair your footage. Then, find the imperfection in your clip, and with your cursor, expand a box around it and let Resolve work its black magic. The process can be slightly confusing because Resolve doesn’t give you an indication that the effect is active, and when you draw a box around the error, there’s no change to the cursor’s appearance.That’s it. It’s remarkably powerful, and even someone brand-new to Resolve can use it. While in my example the hair clip was off to the side and free from any moving objects, this process will work on practically any shot.As with any effect, these tools can cause setbacks, especially when you use the Automatic Dirt Repair on a large number of clips. It will cause playback issues, and both of these tools will only really clean specific imperfections for a few frames at a time. But for cases like the problems listed here, these will be your new go-to tools.Lewis McGregor is a certified DaVinci Resolve trainer.Looking for more Resolve tips and tricks? Check these out.How to Use the Shared Node Feature in DaVinci ResolveQuick Tip: How To Use Optimized Media In DaVinci ResolveRemove Unwanted Shot Features With Resolve 15’s Patch ReplacerResolve’s Lens Reflections and Film Damage FX AnalyzedVideo Tutorial: How to Configure The ADR Panel In Resolve 15last_img read more

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Property Tax Collection Up in Kingston

first_img Property tax collection in the Corporate Area has risen by 169 per cent since April 1 this year Story Highlights 89 per cent increase increased for trade licenses Property tax collection in the Corporate Area has risen by 169 per cent since April 1 this year, when compared to the figure for the corresponding period last year.This was disclosed by Mayor of Kingston, Senator Councillor Angela Brown Burke, during the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC) Council meeting, held at its Church Street offices in downtown Kingston, on August 13.“Yes, we know that the rates were increased, yes we know that there are some individuals who have been finding it difficult (to pay), but we have been operating a (Parish) Discretionary Relief Committee, where individuals can apply (for relief), and we have been granting those waivers,” the Mayor said.She noted that property taxes are mainly used for the maintenance of community amenities, adding that “persons who are paying their taxes, need to see their tax dollars in action.”Senator  Brown Burke also informed that for barbers and hairdressers, collection increased by 18 per cent when compared to last year’s figure.With regard to trade licences, the Mayor said that the figure, when compared to last year, represents an 89 per cent increase, and for signs and billboards, there has been a 41 per cent reduction in the figure, when compared to the corresponding period last year.The Mayor pointed out that targets have been set for the 2013/14 fiscal year, and a compliance team has once again been deployed to focus on issues of enforcement and revenue generation.“We intend to target those areas where improvement can still be made, for example, signs and billboards.  We are aware of the impact of the collection of outstanding arrears last year, as a result of the focus of the revenue officer, with specific responsibility for billboards. We also note that there are still areas where signs are erected without any reference to an application to the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation,” she said, and encouraged citizens to become complaint with the rules and regulations of the KSAC.Mrs. Brown Burke said the Corporation will continue its on-going public education campaign, as part of efforts to increase its compliance rate for trade licences and property tax.The methods used to encourage people to pay their property tax and trade licences include: notices; the use of a town crier in targeted areas; distribution of fliers and reminders; and advertisements of delinquent properties and owners in the media.At the meeting, Councillor Beverly Prince was officially sworn in after winning the recent by-election in the Cassia Park Division of the KSAC. Property taxes are mainly used for the maintenance of community amenitieslast_img read more

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Sexual assault case SC dismisses Tarun Tejpals plea seeking quashing of charges

first_imgNew Delhi: The Supreme Court on Monday dismissed a plea by Tehelka magazine’s founder Tarun Tejpal seeking quashing of charges framed against him in a sexual assault case filed by a former woman colleague. A bench headed by Justice Arun Mishra asked Goa’s lower court to complete the trial preferably within six months in the case against Tejpal. Tejpal is alleged to have sexually assaulted a former woman colleague inside the elevator of a five-star hotel in Goa in 2013. He has denied the allegations. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details Tejpal was arrested on November 30, 2013, by the crime branch after his anticipatory bail plea was rejected by the court. He has been out on bail since May 2014. The court had on August 6 reserved its order on Tejpal’s plea. The Goa Police had claimed that there were “contemporaneous” WhatsApp messages and e-mails which showed that the Tehelka magazine founder should face trial in the case. The police, while opposing Tejpal’s plea seeking quashing of charges framed against him, had told the court that there was “ample material” warranting trial in the case. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Tejpal had moved the apex court, challenging the Bombay High Court’s December 20, 2017, order dismissing his plea seeking quashing of charges. Earlier, he had claimed that there were inconsistencies in the video recordings and the statements of the victim recorded under section 164 of CrPC before the magistrate. The trial court in Mapusa town of Goa had framed charges against Tejpal under various sections of the Indian Penal Code, including alleged sexual harassment and provisions related to rape.last_img read more

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