Listen To Holly Bowling’s Set At Brooklyn Comes Alive, Featuring Elise Testone

first_imgHolly Bowling is a classically trained pianist who began playing piano at the age of five. There’s one major distinction, however, that separates her from other similarly studied musicians. That is Holly’s devotion to the legendary rock band Phish. The past year has seen Holly expand her repertoire into the realm of the Grateful Dead. Using classical piano technique to reinterpret these jam band luminaries, Holly’s live performances infuse new with old, tradition with surreal, and creates a concert experience like nothing else in the music world.Bowling performed at Brooklyn Comes Alive in October, for the second year in a row, during The Hall at MP‘s brunch hours of the long-lasting, music-filled day in Williamsburg, New York. The pianist played through Phish and Grateful Dead classics, and welcomed vocalist Elise Testone for her debut of “Sugaree.” You can listen to the full audio below:Setlist: Holly Bowling | Brooklyn Comes Alive | The Hall at MP, Brooklyn NY | 10/22/16Set: The Curtain With, Row Jimmy, A Song I Heard The Ocean Sing -> Bird Song -> Piper * ->Terrapin Station Suite ** -> The Other One *** -> Cryptical Envelopment -> Squirming Coil, Sugaree #$# first time performed by Holly* w/ ASIHTOS Mashup** w/ Bird Song tease*** w/ Terrapin Mashup$ w/ Elise Testone on vocalsThe 2017 Brooklyn Comes Alive lineup features members of Umphrey’s McGee, moe., The Disco Biscuits, The String Cheese Incident, Trey Anastasio Band, and so many more. Iconic legends, such as John Scofield, George Porter Jr., Cyril Neville, DJ Premier, Johnny Vidacovich, and Henry Butler, will join members of nationally touring bands, such as GRAMMY-winners Snarky Puppy, The Meters, Primus, Soulive, Lettuce, The Motet, Lotus, Railroad Earth, The Infamous Stringdusters,Yonder Mountain String Band, The Russ Liquid Test, SunSquabi, Pendulum, Destroid, The Crystal Method, Midnight North, Aqueous, Kung Fu, Electric Beethoven, and more. Check out the full lineup of artists below, and stay tuned for upcoming announcements about bands, supergroup formations, and special tribute sets.***Tickets Are On Sale Now!***Each ticket grants attendees in-and-out access to all three venues, creating the feeling of an indoor music festival all within the heart of Williamsburg. In true Brooklyn Comes Alive-fashion, a brunch set will kick off the music each day, and performances will continue into the early hours of the morning with special late-night performances.To find out more about ticketing, VIP options, and lodging, head to the festival website.last_img read more

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Fishing for stories

first_img ‘A very, very dangerous moment in our country’s history’ Seeing the forest for the trees Author Daniel Ziblatt analyzes the worldwide movement toward autocracy and concludes American democracy is safe — for now I got there and I was so naive. Whatever my heritage, I was still basically a suburban Massachusetts kid. I got there and my uncle said, “You can’t go out there! The guerrillas just hit the police station out there.” It was like full-scale war there. This was in 1979, during the civil war. That was the most violent year in the history of Guatemala City, though the subsequent three or four years would become the most violent in the country.It was nightmarish and I was there living in my uncle’s house trying to write these stories that were essentially New York City love stories. I thought, What is going on here? But you couldn’t get any information; the local media couldn’t report anything, so it was like living in a fog.Then I got very lucky because I got into various M.F.A. programs and Esquire magazine bought two of my stories I had sent them. After these stories were published, Esquire offered me the chance to do a nonfiction piece. So, at this point I was choosing between doing this one piece that pays $1,000 — which to me was a lot of money, ha — versus a full scholarship to get my M.F.A. I took the Esquire piece because I wanted to go back to Guatemala and write a piece about what was going on there. And that’s how it started.GAZETTE: Your newest novel, which you are working on at the Radcliffe Institute, is set in New Bedford. Why there?GOLDMAN: Well, first, it really just hit a chord — New England held so many literary resonances for me. “Moby Dick” is probably my favorite novel; Hawthorne in the Customs House in Salem, and the Lovecraft coast [author H.P. Lovecraft set many horror stories in fictional Massachusetts coastal towns]. So when I found out that it had also become the center of a Guatemalan and Maya immigrant community — many of whom essentially migrated here in the ’80s during the war — that just spoke to me so deeply. I just had to get to know it.GAZETTE: What were some of your impressions?GOLDMAN: On visiting New Bedford, I had this feeling of almost being in kind of a New England border town. Some of the elements that you associate with a Texas border town you’ll find in New Bedford, that sense of a place where people are crossing over to the U.S., goods but contraband, too, people from all over, a sense of danger, too. The fish-processing plans are something like maquiladoras [factories in Mexico run by foreign countries]. And of course, the omnipresent menace that is ICE. It’s like a New England border town.,GAZETTE: Why is that?GOLDMAN: Its history as the site of layers and layers of immigration. Classically, in the past, fishermen’s migrations — Irish, Scandinavian, and Italian; Portuguese is the big 20th-century one; then, communities related to the Portuguese in certain ways have come — Brazilians, Cape Verdeans, Dominicans, and Puerto Ricans. And now, there is this Central American migration, especially from indigenous Guatemala, many among them who had never even seen the ocean when they were in Guatemala.GAZETTE: What can you tell us about this new novel? What’s it about?GOLDMAN: I don’t know yet. I have some ideas, but prefer to keep them to myself at this point. Though I’ve been dropping in on New Bedford for years, I’ve just started to research it for a novel. I’m just sort of watching different images and ideas float around in my head as I research. What I do know is that I’m tired of working in the first-person voice, having done that now for three straight books. I really want something much more polyphonic now. I do know a few characters are going to carry over from the novel I’ve just finished, which does in fact end in New Bedford.GAZETTE: How does research influence your story?GOLDMAN: The research sends you down surprising trails. You find incredible stories, but you have to be very careful you don’t go down too many. Right now, the more I learn about the history of New Bedford — like old Quaker shipping families, their involvement with the Underground Railroad, the role that Quaker ship captains played in helping slaves escape — I feel so tempted to try to figure out how I can do something with that, though I vowed not to write a historical novel. But the past so resonates with the present, the sanctuary movement, and so on.The novel I’m finishing now [“Monkey Boy”] was 800 pages long when I got here in September. Right now, it’s about 310, so you write a lot of stuff and use a lot of research that you end up throwing out. Believe it or not, that’s one of the fun parts.GAZETTE: What other trail has your research set you on for the New Bedford novel?GOLDMAN: I’ve been fascinated by the commercial fishing industry, the fishing fleet, and especially the fish processing houses where so many of the Guatemalans are employed. When Guatemalans come to the U.S., they mostly follow their communities. You could lay a map of Guatemala over the states, especially over New England, and it’d be a really funny version of Guatemala, because it’d be all the same towns but they’d all be in different locations. The New Bedford Guatemalan community, for example, mainly comes from a group of neighboring towns in El Quiché, which was the department hardest hit during the Guatemalan military’s scorched-earth campaigns during the war. In 1981 the town of Zacualpa had a population of 18,000 but by 1983 only two families were living there — the rest had either been killed or fled. In a New Bedford fish processing plant, I saw a trophy case in the lobby, they’d just won the fish processing league’s soccer tournament, or whatever, and I saw that their team was called Zacualpa United. There’s a lot of trauma in New Bedford’s Guatemalan community, of course, but also a lot of determination and resilience and organizing and resistance. I’ve even found a couple of young Guatemalans who are now working on fishing boats, and in New Bedford that is the iconic workingman’s profession. The fishing fleet has a special stature there, and you think of the generations and generations of boys who’ve gone to sea, from one immigrant group after another, and now, well, that there are Mayas and other Central Americans getting a toehold there, that just seems so a piece with New Bedford’s history.This interview was edited for length and clarity. National Book Award winner Richard Powers discusses how writing his latest novel affected his view of humans and nature Related In 2005, author and journalist Francisco Goldman had the idea to write a novel set in New Bedford, Massachusetts, a place he sees as a quintessential immigrant city, with its influx of Central American migrants. Then, in 2007, tragedy struck.Goldman’s wife, the writer Aura Estrada, died in a body-surfing accident while the pair were vacationing in Mexico. The loss sent Goldman’s writing on an unforeseen autobiographical path as he dealt with his grief. Now, 12 years later and after having released his highly praised novel based on her death — “Say Her Name” — Goldman is returning to his idea of a New Bedford novel as a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, where has also been finishing his forthcoming book, “Monkey Boy.”Goldman’s stories often revolve around Central America, whether they’re fiction, nonfiction, or articles for magazines like Esquire, Harper’s, or The New Yorker. He spent much of the 1980s covering the region’s many wars and more recently has written about the abuse and corruption that led to a fire in Guatemala that killed 40 teenage girls and a series on the 2014 kidnapping of 43 students in Iguala, Mexico.The Gazette spoke with Goldman in advance of an event on Tuesday where he will talk about the new novel and New Bedford. Goldman — the author of four novels, two nonfiction books, and numerous articles — reflected on his current research and what pulls him to Central America and New Bedford.Q&AFrancisco GoldmanGAZETTE: A lot of your work as an author and journalist focuses on Central America, its people, and its migrants. Why is it that you are drawn there?GOLDMAN: It’s my family place. It’s not just that my mother is from Guatemala — I spent a lot of my early childhood there. I guess I would have grown up there if I hadn’t gotten sick. [Goldman had tuberculosis as a child.] That’s why we came back to here. I needed to be able to go to the hospital in Boston and we stayed. But there was always a sense of Guatemala being the place where I felt I was from. My mother really inculcated that in us.GAZETTE: How did you start covering Central America?GOLDMAN: After leaving the University of Michigan, I came to New York and was working as a waiter while trying to write. But it’s very hard to make time to write when you’re a young person in New York, having to work restaurant jobs like five days a week — more, even. Finally, I thought that I should apply to an M.F.A. program. Then, to make the time to write, I decided to go down to my uncle’s house in Guatemala — actually to a family cottage on a small lake outside the city. I’d thought I’d hole up there and write. “I got [to Guatemala] and my uncle said, ‘You can’t go out there! The guerrillas just hit the police station out there.’ It was like full-scale war there.” — Francisco Goldmanlast_img read more

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On-farm Biodiversity

first_imgThe future of food and farms is largely dependent on the collective effort of us all to support more sustainable practices in agriculture — it’s not enough to just be profitable. Agricultural lands have the potential to be some of the most biodiverse landscapes in our increasingly urbanized world.   For many years, researchers have been studying the benefits of ecologically-based farming practices on the overall sustainability of agricultural systems. Farmlands that incorporate pollinator habitat or use cover crops between cash crops tend to have more on-farm biodiversity and, in turn, farmers benefit from the myriad services pollinators and predatory species bring to their system. “Agricultural lands often have spaces around fields that are left wild or fallow. These spaces provide great potential for supporting beneficial insects and pollinators,” said Jason Schmidt, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension entomologist on the UGA Tifton campus.Schmidt and his team research potential options for improving agricultural lands to provide suitable habitat for beneficial species, including birds, and study how farms that incorporate habitat end up reaping major benefits in yields, pest control, and reduced chemical inputs.“It doesn’t matter where you provide habitat, the important thing is that it’s there,” Schmidt explained. “It’s simple. The greater pollinator richness we have in the landscape, the greater pollinator services we will receive. Likewise, the greater number of predator species in the landscape, the greater the pest management services will be rendered.” Beyond the benefits farmers can receive from these species, it’s becoming increasingly important that we all pitch in to do our part for protecting pollinators and beneficial insects.“Habitat conservation and restoration will help maintain and promote biodiversity, which is incredibly important because we are seeing dramatic declines in biodiversity worldwide,” said Schmidt.Declines in insect entomofauna — the insects of an environment or region — have soared to more than 40% of insect species now considered threatened with extinction.“We are also seeing major declines in avian species,” Schmidt cautioned. “Over the past 48 years, we have seen a decline of almost 3 billion birds or 29% of 1970 abundance.”The major drivers of these insect and avian declines are primarily attributed to conversion to intensive agriculture, pesticides, urbanization, invasive species, habitat loss and climate change.“The significance of these declines is that insects and birds are both really good indicators of environmental health and ecosystem integrity” Schmidt said.Fortunately, because the major drivers of these declines are primarily attributed to human behaviors, hope exists that behavioral changes will begin to shift through better understanding and a greater appreciation for biodiversity.“The most important part of this shift will be to make people aware of the importance of biodiversity,” he said.Strategies for increasing biodiversity include attracting beneficial insects like predators and pollinators to home and urban landscapes and nurseries and using current Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices to minimize unintentional harm that can occur with pesticide use.So, what can farmers do? Whether you’re a small grower or a large commercial grower, plan for areas in the landscape that are left out of production. Potential areas include spaces where production is difficult and yields are low given inputs.Bring back native plant species into these areas that can tolerate marginal conditions. There are now many commercially available native wildflower and grass mixes and flowering trees to help improve habitat for beneficial insects.“Some say we have to worry about when to plant and how to plant, but too much worry leads growers to opt-out,” said Schmidt. “But, many native flowers to the Southeast are pre-packaged and ready to go.”For the initial establishment of these native flower beds, make sure to start with a weed-free area, preferably in an area that would easily receive water. In Nebraska and Kansas, there are many pivot irrigation systems. They have begun creating “conservation corners” or “corners for wildlife.” Though the irrigation reaches these corners, it’s not as much as the rest of the field so production is usually lower. Growers have begun planting native grasses and wildflowers in these areas, and some are planting other flowering species that can be harvested as commodities, such as sunflowers.“Getting plants established will require attention to good seedbed and monitoring, just as you would a cash crop,” said Schmidt.Management decisions will be site-specific, as one location can be very different from the next, even on the same farm. Successfully promoting habitat for beneficial insects will require management of pests and consideration of pesticides used near habitat-provisioning areas.“Many farmers have scouts that go out looking for insect pests throughout the growing season, so one shift in practice would be to also scout for pollinators or beneficial insects. In many ways, scouts would be monitoring for biodiversity, not just for problems,” Schmidt said.Establishing more habitat on-farm that supports biodiversity will require a shift in people’s mindsets, placing a higher value on pollinators and beneficial insects and a willingness to try new things.“The wonderful thing is that research demonstrates that even a little effort goes a long way to inviting natural enemies and pollinators into agricultural systems,” Schmidt said. “Just plant it and they will come.”For more information about UGA’s Integrated Pest Management program visit ipm.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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SOUTHCOM Teams up with Guatemala to Improve Quality of Education

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo March 08, 2018 Under the auspices of the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid (OHDACA) program coordinated by U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), the Guatemalan Army builds school desks. The mission supports the “Desks for Our Children Campaign” for Guatemalan students at underserved rural schools to study in a suitable learning environment. “This is the first time a donation of this nature has been made in Guatemala and in Latin America. The Security Cooperation Office in Guatemala, under the auspices of OHDACA’s humanitarian aid section, provides all the materials needed to build school desks,” U.S. Army Major Sergio López, SOUTHCOM’s Humanitarian Assistance Program representative in Guatemala, told Diálogo. “In August 2017, following a thorough analysis, SOUTHCOM decided to approve this low-cost initiative in support of the Guatemalan Ministry of Education.” Given the needs of the nation’s primary schools, the Guatemalan authorities, in coordination with SOUTHCOM, “made it a priority to provide desks to students at educational centers located in remote and disadvantaged areas that suffered the effects of the long civil war in past decades [1960-1996],” Maj. López said. “I’ve been to places where children study under plastic roofs, seated on stones. These educational institutions have so many needs.” “This donation helps us provide school children good-quality desks to improve conditions in the classrooms where they receive their lessons, through an alliance with SOUTHCOM,” Guatemalan Army Colonel Ronald Salvador Tobías Ayala, head of the Department of War Materiel (SMG, in Spanish), told Diálogo. “This aid reaches populations where the level of education and conditions of school equipment are inadequate.” Production As part of the Guatemalan Army’s comprehensive action plan, service members from different military commands make up the production line for the school desks. SMG specialists from the unit’s various workshops—carpentry, painting, welding, and from the weapons department— train service members. The SMG unit is responsible for optimizing the useful life cycle of the Guatemalan Army’s vehicles, weapons, explosives, and ammunition. According to Maj. López, the Army built 2,700 desks as of February 23, 2018. Each month, service members manufacture 900 desks at a cost of $15,000. “SOUTHCOM delivers financial resources directly to companies that provide the supplies to build these desks,” Col. Tobías said. The school desks are built of plywood on a frame of industrial tubing, with a brushed metal tray, stainless steel screws and rivets, paint, and plastic caps. Maj. López and Col. Tobías agreed that the furniture is of better quality that what can be found among commercial manufacturers and that it may last up to 10 years. The “Desks for Our Children Campaign” was launched to support the “Development Train” program, a Guatemalan initiative, created in 2016. Guatemalan Armed Forces work in collaboration with 10 ministries to implement anti-poverty projects such as road construction, desk manufacturing, and security assistance. “Due to a lack of financial resources, we requested SOUTHCOM’s assistance to continue to build these school desks,” Col. Tobías explained. According to the Guatemalan Ministry of Education’s report 2016-2019 Strategy for Addressing School Infrastructure at the Preschool, Primary, and Secondary Levels, the government invested $91 million in school furniture and the retrofitting, construction, and rebuilding of schools in 2017. Of these resources, $76 million came by way of loans and donations. The greatest contribution Industrial equipment (lathes, milling machines, and grinders) that the U.S. government donated to the Guatemalan Army in the 1960s, through the Office of Security Cooperation at the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala—to conduct automotive repairs—allows for school desks to be built. “Now that the civil war ended, this equipment is the greatest contribution to carry out our assigned mission,” Col. Tobías said. “Our specialists did minor changes to the lathes. Once this campaign is over, they’ll go back to being used for what they were designed.” “SOUTHCOM promotes and supports Guatemala’s development. Through its cooperation, it contributes to childhood development, which, in the short term, will produce better citizens, better people with a better quality of life than what they had available to them before the desk campaign began,” Col. Tobías said. “The student population, parents, and principals at these educational centers are profoundly grateful to the Guatemalan Army and U.S. Southern Command for this no-cost contribution,” he added. “For SOUTHCOM, it’s important to assist our partner nations on issues of health and education. The raison d’être of the Guatemalan Army is the people,” Maj. López concluded. “This donation will last as long as it’s needed and as long as SOUTHCOM funds continue to flow.”last_img read more

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New Hyde Park Crash Kills NJ Man

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 71-year-old New Jersey man was fatally struck by a car in New Hyde Park on Wednesday night.Nassau County police said Thomas M. Thomas got out of his car to ask for directions when he was hit by an eastbound Mercedes Benz on Marcus Avenue at 10:30 p.m.The victim was taken to North Shore University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly later.Homicide Squad detectives tested the vehicle and found no criminality.last_img read more

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Mali president resigns after detention by military, deepening crisis

first_imgIt was not immediately clear who was leading the revolt, who would govern in Keita’s absence or what the mutineers wanted.Images posted earlier on social media said to be taken at the Kati garrison showed Keita and Cisse surrounded by armed soldiers. Reuters could not verify the authenticity of the videos.Mali has seen months of protests against alleged corruption and worsening security in the West African country where Islamist militants are active, and there have been calls for Keita to resign.The M5-RFP coalition behind the protests signaled support for the mutineers’ action, with spokesman Nouhoum Togo telling Reuters it was “not a military coup but a popular insurrection”. Mali President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita resigned on Tuesday and dissolved parliament hours after mutinying soldiers detained him at gunpoint, plunging a country already facing a jihadist insurgency and mass protests deeper into crisis.Looking tired and wearing a surgical mask, Keita resigned in a brief address broadcast on state television after troops seized him along with Prime Minister Boubou Cisse and other top officials.”If today, certain elements of our armed forces want this to end through their intervention, do I really have a choice?” he said from a military base in Kati outside the capital Bamako where he had been detained earlier in the day. Hundreds of anti-government protesters poured into a central square in Bamako to celebrate and cheer the mutineers as they drove through in military vehicles and fired rounds of celebratory gunfire.A mutiny in 2012 at the same Kati base led to a military coup that toppled then-President Amadou Toumani Toure and hastened the fall of Mali’s north to jihadist militants.French forces intervened the following year to beat them back. But the militants have since regrouped and expanded their influence into neighboring Burkina Faso and Niger, attacking soldiers, civilians and Western tourists.International condemnationFrance and other international powers as well as the African Union denounced the mutiny, fearful that Keita’s fall could further destabilize the former French colony and West Africa’s entire Sahel region.UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called for the immediate release of Keita and the other detainees.”I energetically condemn the arrest of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, the prime minister and other members of the Malian government and call for their immediate liberation,” African Union Chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat said on Twitter.French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said France “condemns in the strongest terms this grave event”.The US envoy to the Sahel, J. Peter Pham, said on Twitter that “the US is opposed to all extra-constitutional changes of government”.The Economic Community of West African States condemned “the overthrow by putschist soldiers of the democratically elected government”.In a statement, it ordered the closing of regional borders with Mali and suspension of all financial flows between Mali and its 15 members states.At least 14 people were killed in July in the demonstrations that were called for by a coalition of Keita’s political opponents, religious leaders and civil society activists.Keita had hoped concessions to opponents and recommendations from a mediating delegation of regional leaders would help stem the tide of dissatisfaction, but the protest leaders have rejected proposals to join a power-sharing government.”Whether he’s been arrested or not, what is certain is that his end is near. God is granting our prayers. IBK is finished,” Haidara Assetou Cisse, a teacher, said earlier in the day, referring to Keita by his initials.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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2 dead, 2 injured in North Carolina municipal building shooting

first_img2 people are dead and 2 others have been injured after a shooting at a municipal building in North Carolina.The incident began around 6:40 a.m. Friday at the Joycelyn  V. Johnson Municipal building in Winston- Salem.When authorities arrived at the scene, they reported that they could still hear gun fire coming from inside of the building.Police immediately engaged the gunman identified as 61-year-old Steven DeWayne Haizlip, and fatally injured him in the shootout outside of the building.48-year-old Terry Lee Cobb Jr. who was fatally injured by Haizlip was pronounced dead at the scene. An officer and another employee were also injured by Haizlip and remain in the hospital at this time.Witnesses describe the scene as a workplace dispute between two men who had a longstanding dislike of each other.  They also reported that the suspect and the deceased victim got into an argument on Thursday, just one day before the shooting.Authorities are continuing to investigate the incident, including the discovery that Haizlip was armed with two handguns.This is a developing story.last_img read more

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Aussie teenager sets two world records for football skills

first_imgSydney, July 9: Jeb Hockin, an 18-year-old from rural Australia, has become a double world record holder, demonstrating some truly incredible talents with a football.Hockin set two Guinness world records for a “rabona” style kick, first for hitting the crossbar seven times in a minute, and then scoring a goal from 60 metres on Sunday. The “rabona” kick is “where you put your strong leg, behind your weak leg and kick the ball,” Hockin explained. The teen also became internet famous last week with his “trick shot” videos being shared on the fans’ pages of Manchester United and Real Madrid that have millions of followers.Australia’s lead goal scorer and former English Premier League and Chinese Super League player, Tim Cahill shared his admiration for Hockin in a video, saying “I’ve supported you from the start and it’s great to see you flourish.”Hockin will keep kicking and attempting more records, but for now he is proud of what he has accomplished after a decade of practice.“You start from basically nothing and you build up to all these crazy things,” Hockin said. “It just goes to show anything is possible,” he added. IANSlast_img read more

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Franchise League 3-day tournament

first_imgBaldeo, Ivan hit contrasting centuriesBALCHAND Baldeo and Rajiv Ivan both struck contrasting hundreds as Upper Corentyne closed the second day of their seventh and final round of the Franchise League three-day tournament against Georgetown in a commanding position yesterday at the Port Mourant ground.Baldeo struck 107 off 133 balls, inclusive of 12 fours and two sixes while Ivan hit 102 in 117 balls, with nine fours and three sixes, as the hosts were bowled out for 440 in 91.3 overs.David Latchaya contributed 69 on day two.Bowling for the city side, Shemroy Barrington claimed 6-38 while leg-spinner Steven Sankar took 4-158.Meanwhile, at Everest, East Coast closed the opening day against East Bank on 184-3. Ameer Khan and Kamesh Yadram are unbeaten on 69 and 57 respectively.West Indies youth player Bhaskar Yadram had earlier contributed 38.At Tuschen, Essequibo closed on 124-4.The other seventh round game between hosts West Berbice and Lower Corentyne was abandoned without a ball being bowled at Bush Lot.last_img read more

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SB : Erratic pitching leads to upset loss for Syracuse in opening round of Big East tournament

first_imgSyracuse softball won’t three-peat as Big East champions.In the opening round of Thursday’s Big East tournament, the Orange (40-14, 17-5) could muster only one run in a 2-1 upset loss against St. John’s (22-33, 9-12).SU stranded eight runners in the loss, including the potential tying run in the bottom of the seventh inning. Left fielder Lisaira Daniels bunted for a single with one out to extend SU’s last inning, but was left on base when right fielder Shirley Daniels struck out and second baseman Stephanie Watts popped out to center to end the game.The loss is a disappointing one for senior catcher Lacey Kohl. SU beat the Red Storm twice in a three game series earlier this season. In those wins, the Orange scored double digit runs.But when the stakes were higher, that same Red Storm team was able to limit SU hitters to seven singles and only one run.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘It’s like (hitting) coach King told us, we hit for extra bases,’ Kohl said.’We’re not going to win games with seven singles.’Especially not when ace Jenna Caira has an off day. The senior pitcher struggled to hit her spots all game and issued four walks.Caira’s costliest walk started the fifth inning. Locked in a scoreless pitcher’s duel with Red Storm pitcher Ashley Beza, Caira walked leadoff hitter Michelle Tilson. Tilson reached second on a wild pitch, advanced to third on a single, and scored the game’s first run with a sacrifice fly by Chrissy Montez.Stacy Kuwik replaced Caira in the sixth inning, but wild pitches still haunted SU. With the bases loaded and no one out, Red Storm catcher Kacee Cox scored from third base after Kuwik misfired.Kuwik didn’t allow a hit in the final two innings she pitched, but St. John’s was able to tack on a crucial insurance run. And in a close game against a sputtering SU offense, Kohl said that run was the difference between an SU win and an upset loss.SU now has to hope that its 40-win season will be enough to earn an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament. The 64-team field will be announced on Sunday night at 9 p.m.Kohl said SU’s next opponent will face an Orange team with a chip on its shoulder because of the loss to the Red Storm.‘That third ring would’ve been great,’ Kohl said. ‘But we’re focused on Sunday and what happens after. They will pay for what we went through today.’[email protected] Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on May 10, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Nick: [email protected] | @nicktoneytweetslast_img read more

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