7 Units of Social Housing / Atelier Tom Vanhee + Luk Van Neste

first_img Contractor: Architects: Atelier Tom Vanhee, Luk Van Neste Area Area of this architecture project Houses Area:  756 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project 2019 7 Units of Social Housing / Atelier Tom Vanhee + Luk Van Neste “COPY” ArchDaily Save this picture!© Stijn Bollaert+ 16Curated by Paula Pintos Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/936638/7-units-of-social-housing-atelier-tom-vanhee-plus-luk-van-neste Clipboard Photographs 7 Units of Social Housing / Atelier Tom Vanhee + Luk Van NesteSave this projectSave7 Units of Social Housing / Atelier Tom Vanhee + Luk Van Neste Projects CopyHouses•Eeklo, Belgium Photographs:  Stijn Bollaert Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Clients:MBVEngineering:Willy Moens, Raadgevend Ingenieur de Munck Pascal bvbaCollaborators:Karsten Riedel, Sönke TimmCity:EekloCountry:BelgiumMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Stijn BollaertRecommended ProductsStonesNeolithSintered Stone – Arctic White – Colorfeel CollectionCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemWindowsAir-LuxSliding Window – CurvedMetallicsStudcoWall Stop Ends – EzyCapText description provided by the architects. The dens building counts 4 storeys and 7 appartments. It ends a line of rowhouses and marks a green axis in the city where an old steam train passes by.Save this picture!© Stijn BollaertSave this picture!Ground floor planSave this picture!© Stijn BollaertInspired by the red bricks and white windows and cornices of the rowhouses in the street,  we also make a building with red massonry and white windows. A covered entrance on the ground floor makes a transition between public and private. Also it makes it possible to park near the building for the more elderly inhabitants.Save this picture!© Stijn BollaertEvery house has a terrace in relation with the living space.  we create more privacy by spreading the balconies on three facades.  An elevator and stairs are giving acces to the appartmenst on the floors.  On the ground floor every appartment has a storage for bycicles or other vehicles.Save this picture!© Stijn BollaertProject gallerySee allShow lessWoodcroft Neighbourhood Centre / Carter Williamson ArchitectsSelected ProjectsCross Ventilation, the Chimney Effect and Other Concepts of Natural VentilationArticles Share Year:  Belgium Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Aluprof, GEZE, RENSON, Saint-Gobain, Vande Moortel, Ytong, Art Stone, Dyka Plastics, Gebertit PE, Isolava, Isolgomma, Ursa XPS ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/936638/7-units-of-social-housing-atelier-tom-vanhee-plus-luk-van-neste Clipboard Recon Bouw N.V. “COPY” CopyAbout this officeAtelier Tom VanheeOfficeFollowLuk Van NesteOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesOn FacebookEekloBelgiumPublished on April 05, 2020Cite: “7 Units of Social Housing / Atelier Tom Vanhee + Luk Van Neste” 05 Apr 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ NaturalPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Mirage®WindowsVitrocsaSliding Window – Mosquito NetSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Verge LVG-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 4″Sports ApplicationsPunto DesignPunto Fit in Ekaterinburg Public SpaceWoodBlumer LehmannFree Form Structures for Wood ProjectsKnobsKarcher DesignDoor Knob K390 (50)TablesVitsœ621 Side TableMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?社会福利联排住宅 / Atelier Tom Vanhee + Luk Van Neste是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Read More →

Haitian Revolution shook empires

first_imgIn a Vodou ceremony led by Dutty Boukman in 1791, several hundred enslaved people swore to fight to the death against a brutal system of slavery and torture. The revolt that followed would shake the greatest empires of Europe and burn the slave society of Saint-Domingue to the ground. From the ashes emerged the first Black Republic in the Western Hemisphere and the first nation founded by a successful slave rebellion: Haiti.In the 18th century, Saint-Domingue — the western French-owned half of the island of Hispañola — was the most lucrative colony in the Caribbean. Its primary export was sugar, which was extremely valuable. By 1780, Saint-Domingue was producing 40 percent of the sugar consumed in Europe. Their incredible profits were the product of incredible human suffering. Harvesting sugar cane was labor intensive, and enslaved people were imported to the island in greater and greater numbers as sugar profits rose. By 1787, the colony was importing 40,000 enslaved people per year. More than 60 percent of enslaved people on the island were African-born. Enslaved people were worked to death and tortured brutally if they resisted. Mortality rates were high — 50 percent of enslaved people died within a year of arriving in Saint-Domingue. But the business was so lucrative, planters simply opted to import more enslaved people rather than improve treatment.In any slave society, sexual assault is rampant; as a result, many mixed-race children were produced. In Saint-Domingue, the French referred to them as “Coloreds.” What made Saint-Domingue different from other slave societies was that slave owners openly entered relationships with, and even married, their Black and Colored enslaved people. The Colored offspring would then go on to inherit their father’s property — including the plantations and the enslaved people. This created a new socio-racial class that was oppressed by strict de jure racial discrimination, but, at the same time, possessed vast amounts of wealth.Adding to these divisions were the contradictions between wealthy whites and poor whites or “grands blancs” and “petit blancs.” The grands blancs owned the plantations, but they spent very little time in Saint-Domingue. Some had never been to the island at all. They hired petit blancs, whites from the lower classes who were desperate to escape their debts, to manage the plantations. For petit blancs, the goal was to earn enough money to buy their own plantations and perhaps leave Saint-Domingue.French Revolution inspires revoltsWith the social stratification of Saint-Domingue, the French Revolution in 1789 hit the island like a meteor. The grands blancs saw the revolution as their chance to extricate themselves from the hated “Exclusive,” the system of trade laws that prevented Saint-Domingue from trading with any other nation besides France. The petit blancs, on the other hand, wanted to renegotiate the entire social contract.The petit blancs attempted to form their own councils and began marching across the island, extolling the virtues of liberté (liberty) and égalité (equality). They were quick to use mob violence against all who stood in opposition.Meanwhile, enslaved Blacks observed the revolutionary ferment and planned to secure their own liberty. Historian Carolyn Fick argues that enslaved people held secret meetings every week throughout the summer of 1791.The Haitian Revolution would never have been possible without the information network that connected Blacks throughout the island. Enslaved people who worked in the ports overheard the news from sailors and merchants. Through Black overseers and coachmen — who held the trust of their masters and were therefore given significant freedom of movement — this information was passed along to the enslaved people on the plantations in the interior. Escaped enslaved people, living in settlements known as “maroon colonies,” also communicated with Blacks on the plantations and provided safe places for meetings. One unique feature of slavery in Saint-Domingue was that temporary escape, “petit marronage,” for a night or even a few days was quite common and sometimes went unpunished. Through these short-term excursions, Blacks were able to meet and coordinate their actions in the remote mountain regions of the island. It was during these meetings that rumors spread of new laws passed in France. The possibility that reforms in treatment were coming, perhaps the banning of the whip and all other forms of torture, filled the enslaved people with hope and courage. But if such reforms had been made, there was no evidence that the white masters planned to implement them. Drastic measures had to be taken, and the plot for insurrection was born.On Aug. 14, 1791, Black conspirators slipped back into their plantations in the night, killed their masters and torched the instruments of their enslavement. Sugar cane fields are highly flammable, and in just a few days most of the North Province of Saint-Domingue was set ablaze. All the machinery on the sugar plantations was destroyed; the means of production were not merely seized but annihilated so that the planter system could never return.White citizens, who had retreated to the large port city of Cap‑Français, looked out on a landscape of smoke and ash. In the midst of their own struggle for liberty, the whites of Saint-Domingue had done little to prepare for the possibility of a slave insurrection, even though a few captured Blacks had confessed to the plot several weeks prior. Blinded by white supremacy, the colonists could not imagine that “their” enslaved people would fight as fiercely and as bravely as any Europeans to free themselves from oppression. Angry and confused white colonists descended into rioting and lynched any Blacks they could find in the city. But the insurrection could not be stopped. France effectively lost control of Saint-Domingue in those first few months and never regained it. What followed were several years of guerrilla warfare. Several leaders emerged from this struggle, the most famous being Toussaint Louverture. Louverture had been born into slavery under a lenient master. He learned to read and studied European classics. He was likely tutored in the ways of West African warfare by his father, reported to have been an African chief. By the time the revolution broke out, Louverture had been free for many years and worked as a supervisor on his former master’s plantation. Louverture joined the growing insurgency, and his education and ability resulted in his rapid appointment as a rebel commander.As the French Revolution sent shockwaves throughout Europe, the surrounding monarchies declared war on France one by one. Britain invaded Saint-Domingue from the west, hoping to snatch the most valuable colony in the Caribbean while France was embroiled in chaos. Spain, already holding the eastern half of the island (Santo Domingo) and, seeing an easy opportunity to undermine the revolution in France, began supplying the Black insurgents with weapons and supplies. This encouraged many rebels, including Louverture, to join the Spanish and resist the French during 1792 and 1793. Slavery abolishedBut in 1794, France officially abolished slavery in all its territories. Knowing that no other imperialist power would take such a radical step, Louverture and his rebel forces allied with France to resist the monarchist powers. Like a hammer and anvil, Louverture in the north and the Colored general André Rigaud in the south led Black, Colored and white soldiers against the British in the center of the colony, forcing them off the island. The brilliant leadership of the Black insurgency, which had first taken Saint-Domingue from France, had now won the island back for France. This made Louverture a valuable asset for the colonial government. The white members of the French Civil Commission, who nominally governed Saint-Domingue from Cap‑Français, relied on Louverture to enforce their decrees and maintain order in the colony. The Black people had won their freedom, and most were content to live as subjects of France, so long as France respected that freedom.But the plantation owners, who had been made refugees by the insurrection, continued to plead their cause in France. As the forces of counterrevolution took hold in Europe, the exiled colonists gained more sway. When Napoleon Bonaparte seized power in 1797, the proponents of slavery finally found a sympathetic ear. During the period of 1795-1800, contradictions mounted in Saint-Domingue. Although the Black population was free, the French Civil Commissioners were eager to restore the profits from sugar exports. They mandated that Blacks remain on the plantations to work as paid laborers. The Black masses resented this serfdom, but there was little they could do. Meanwhile, the Black leadership sought to appease the French. There was only one nation in Europe which would tolerate free Blacks in such a wealthy colony, so Black generals, Louverture included, enforced the labor laws demanded by France. There was also a division of race and class between the Blacks and the Coloreds. The Coloreds believed that their wealth and education made them better suited to governing and resented seeing formerly enslaved Black people in positions of power. These contradictions culminated in the “War of Knives” in 1799. Instigated by the reactionary French Commissioner Hédouville, the most prominent Colored leader Rigaud rebelled against Louverture’s mostly Black forces. Rigaud’s southern army was outnumbered, but he counted on aid from the British. That aid never came. It was not long before Louverture’s most dangerous lieutenant, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, moved south and crushed Rigaud. ‘Haiti’ is bornLouverture consolidated his power, becoming master of Saint-Domingue. He devoted himself to rebuilding the plantation economy and creating a society without racial discrimination. He enshrined racial equality in a new constitution and declared himself governor for life. But in France, Napoleon Bonaparte saw Saint-Domingue as the launching point for a new North American empire. He craved the seemingly boundless profits that only a slave economy could produce. And he resented the Black general who presumed to rule Saint-Domingue and issue proclamations and constitutions without his approval. In 1801, Napoleon sent his brother-in-law, General Charles Leclerc, and 40,000 French soldiers to oust Louverture and restore white rule.The result was a war where disease, a veteran Black army and ceaseless guerrilla warfare would devastate the French forces, leaving only about 8,000 survivors to return to France. Louverture would not live to see the end of the war; he would be captured by Leclerc and die in a French prison in 1803. It was left to Dessalines and the masses of armed free Blacks to beat back the French and establish an independent Haiti on Jan. 1, 1804. In choosing the name “Haiti,” the name given the island by its original Taino inhabitants, Dessalines repudiated not just slavery, but 300 years of colonialism. Today, as we see Haiti struggle under the oppression of neocolonial forces, we should remember that this small island nation was founded as a symbol of resistance and liberation. It is exactly that symbol that imperialists have always sought, yet failed, to destroy. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Read More →

Community Transmission of Coronavirus on the Rise in L.A. County, Pasadena Seeing More Work-Related Infections

first_img Top of the News 16 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it More Cool Stuff Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Make a comment Community News Community Transmission of Coronavirus on the Rise in L.A. County, Pasadena Seeing More Work-Related Infections By BRIAN DAY Published on Tuesday, June 23, 2020 | 2:53 pm Community News HerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeauty Subscribe Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website center_img EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News Business News STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes As Los Angeles County continues pushing forward with gradual reopening plans, L.A. County Public Health Department officials expressed concerns Tuesday over increasing community transmission of coronavirus after seeing a significant increase in detected infections over the past week.Pasadena saw 19 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday and no new deaths, according to city spokeswoman Lisa Derderian. A total of 1,196 infections have been reported in the city, and 88 people have died from the virus.Los Angeles County public health officials reported 2,364 new infections and 34 new deaths on Tuesday, bringing total cases in the county to 88,262. Total deaths reached 3,171.It marked the third time since June 17 that more than 2,000 new infections were reported in L.A. County, according to the Public Health Department. Prior to the past week, newly reported cases have not topped 2,000 since May 30.“The recent increase in daily cases and rates of positive test results indicates that there is more community spread of COVID-19 in LA County,” L.A. County Director of Public Health Barbara Ferrer said in a written statement. “It is as important as ever to use the tools we have to slow the spread of the virus. Please practice physical distancing and wear a cloth face covering. If you have been exposed and/or if you have tested positive for COVID-19 or waiting for results, please self-isolate and stay away from other people, even those who live in your household. These actions save lives.”“To the family and friends of people who have passed away from COVID-19, we wish you healing and peace during this sad and difficult time,” Ferrer said.County health officials said 1,515 people were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Tuesday, with 27% of them in intensive-care units and 18% being treated on ventilators.Pasadena has also seen a larger number of new infections reported daily than in recent weeks.Reports of new cases of COVID-19 have grown 16 and 25 each day since June 17, Pasadena Public Public Health Department data shows. But between June 8 and June 15, reports of new infections remained in single-digits.Forty-eight COVID-19 patients were hospitalized at Huntington Hospital as of Tuesday, according to hospital data.Officials did not see a link between church services or protests and new infections, “but we are identifying more work-related exposures,” Dederian said.The novel coronavirus is known to hit the elderly and those with compromised immune systems the hardest. More than 75% of those who have died from coronavirus in L.a. County were over 65 years old, data shows.But health officials in Pasadena have expressed concern after noticing a seeming uptick in infections among younger people.Officials have found younger patients tend to be less likely to stay in communication with them following a positive test result than older patients.“When a health representative calls, it’s important that you communicate and cooperate to help with contact tracing to identify those people who need to be told to isolate (or) quarantine and what symptoms to look for,” Derderian said.“All it takes is one to bring the virus home to a larger household of older and/or a more vulnerable population,” she said. STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week last_img read more

Read More →

County loses angel and patriot

first_imgLatest Stories Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Sponsored Content The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… You Might Like Historical society learns about the art of spinning cotton Shirley Blankenship made spinning cotton into thread look as easy as falling off a log. But those who attended Blankenship’s… read more Email the author Published 3:00 am Tuesday, January 31, 2017 By The Penny Hoarder Ben Andress, a founding member of Charlie’s Angels and a proud veteran and patriot, passed away on Sunday. He was known throughout the county as the flag bearer for parades and patriotic events.Pike County has lost an Angel. Ben Andress, a charter member of Charlie’s Angels, died on Sunday, leaving the county void of one of its greatest patriots and its unfailing flag bearer. Charlie Dunn, leader of Charlie’s Angels, and Andress grew up in the Banks community and were friends since childhood. center_img County loses angel and patriot Book Nook to reopen Next Up“We shot marbles together. I won all of his marbles but, to hear Ben tell it, he won all of mine,” Dunn said, with a laugh. “Ben has always been patriotic. When we organized Charlie’s Angels about 19 years ago, he was there and ready to go. I could tell by the look in his eyes that Ben wanted to be the one to carry the flag. He loved the American flag as much as I do.”Andress, 82, served his country with the Army and was retired from the Alabama National Guard.Dennis Griffith, American Legion Post 70 post adjunct, and Freddie Turner, VFW Post 5077 quartermaster, said Andress was one of the most patriotic gentlemen they have ever known. By Jaine Treadwell Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson “You couldn’t miss Ben at a parade,” Griffith said. “If he wasn’t carrying the flag, he would be standing proudly, in parade dress, with the American Flag.” Turner said, too, that Andress bled red, white and blue.“Ben loved the flag and he carried it with pride,” Turner said. “I don’t know of anybody that loved and respected the American Flag more than Ben. He carried the flag in parades as long as he was able and he honored it always.”Andress was the flag bearer in parades all around the county. He carried the flag at the last China Grove Fourth of July Parade and at the first Fourth of July Parade at Meeksville –- both on the same day. Print Article That was an especially proud day for Andress in that he was a flag-bearer twice in one day.“Ben was one faithful guy to the Meeksville Parade,” said Earnest Green. “Even when walking got hard for him, he was determined. One parade he walked a while and then somebody picked him up a carried him the rest of the way. We had a trailer that he could sit and ride on but he wouldn’t sit. He wanted to stand up to hold the flag.  Ben Andress was very special to us.”As a member of Charlie’s Angels, Andress was also the flag bearer at military funerals in the local area and he took great pride in that.“He was a real patriot and a dedicated supporter of our veterans’ organizations,” Dunn said. Andress was also the chief cook for American Legion Post 70’s second Saturday breakfasts.He also cooked at the Brundidge National Guard.“I remember those hardtack biscuits and that SOS beef on toast Ben fixed for us,” Turner said. “Ben could cook pancakes, sausage and eggs all at the same time and right by himself. He didn’t want anybody in the kitchen but him.”Andress was quite a jokester. “When he got where he couldn’t carry the flag, he said it was because his tires were slick,” Turner said, laughing. Griffith said, too, that Andress had a great sense of humor.“One morning at the breakfast at American Legion post, he got down and did one-arm pushups to show us he was in good shape.Andress was a member of the Masons and a dedicated bell ringer for the Pike County Salvation Army. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Read More →

Michigan prisoner who served 44 years died from coronavirus days before release

first_imgDanHenson1/iStockBy BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC News(DETROIT) — Yolanda Peterson says she had prepared a room in her Michigan home for her brother, eagerly anticipating his release from prison after serving 44 years for a murder that initially got him a sentence of life without parole when he was barely old enough to drive.On April 12, she said a parole agent inspected her suburban Detroit residence and deemed it a suitable place for 60-year-old William Garrison to live. “He was looking forward to getting out,” Peterson told ABC News of her older brother. “He wanted to work as an advocate for people in jail. He was a very knowledgable person. He had a lot going on. He helped a lot of prisoners, reviewing their cases. He got people out of jail.”But a day after the parole agent visited Peterson’s home, Garrison died at the Macomb Correctional Facility in Lenox Township, Michigan, and a postmortem test confirmed he had contracted the novel coronavirus, prison officials said.His death came just 24 days before he likely would have been released.“I’m grieving right now,” Peterson said on Tuesday while adhering to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s statewide coronavirus stay-at-home orders. “I’m the only person who closely stood with my brother for 44 years and walked this road with him. We’re heartbroken because he was coming home. Justice should be served because my brother shouldn’t have died.”At the age of 16, Garrison was convicted of murder for gunning down a 50-year-old man during a 1976 home-invasion robbery, a mistake his sister said “he repented for over and over again.” However, her brother, she said, had felt the courts had done him an injustice by making him a juvenile lifer.After the U.S. Supreme Court banned life-without-parole sentences for juveniles in 2018, Garrison was resentenced in January to a term of 40 to 90 years. By then he had already served more than his minimum sentence.Garrison rejects offer of early paroleChris Gautz, spokesman for the Michigan Department of Corrections, said the case is even more heartbreaking because the state parole board had granted Garrison early parole back in February before the first cases of coronavirus appeared in Michigan, but he refused to accept it. He decided to wait out the remainder of his sentence, which, at that time, would have ended on Sept. 4, Gautz said, noting that Garrison had been awarded more than 7,000 days of “good time” credits.“What he told the board was, ‘I would rather stay in here until September and walk out a completely free man rather than walk out right now and be on parole and have to report to a parole agent and have to go through all that,’” Gautz told ABC News.But when the first presumptive cases of COVID-19 were announced in Michigan in early March, corrections officials began scrambling to reduce the state prison population, anticipating that social distancing would be tough to accomplish in packed prison cellblocks.“We started proactively looking for individuals who were elderly, who might be more prone to contracting the virus. So, he popped up on our list,” Gautz said. “We went to him again and said, ‘Hey look, we tried to parole you before and you didn’t want to go, but now that this virus is here and you’re over the age of 60, and the experts say that you’re more prone to get it, we’d like to consider you for parole again.’”This time, Garrison accepted the offer.But before he could be paroled, corrections officials were obligated to send a letter to prosecutors in the county where Garrison was convicted of murder advising them of his impending release. The letter was sent on April 8, giving the Wayne County prosecutor 28 days to appeal, Gautz said.“Obviously they’re our most populous county and we’ve sent them more than 100 letters,” Gautz said of the county that encompasses Detroit. “We haven’t heard back on any of them, but we know that they have many other things that they’re doing.”Barring an appeal from the Wayne County prosecutor, Garrison was set to be released on May 6, Gautz said.‘Gasping for air’On April 13, Garrison’s cellmate cried out for help when he noticed Garrison appeared to be in medical distress, Gautz said.“His bunkmate said that he was gasping for air and he called out for help, and our officers rushed in, performed life-saving measures, got the ambulance in there, got him to the hospital,” Gautz said. “Once he was at the hospital and died, the doctors there decided to test him postmortem for COVID-19.”Peterson claims she was contacted by her brother’s cellmate, who she says told her that he had symptoms of coronavirus prior to Garrison’s death. She said other prisoners who witnessed her brother’s fatal episode told her that prison staff was slow in responding to repeated calls for help from Garrison’s bunkmate and that corrections officers handcuffed her brother when he fell unconscious onto the cell floor.“He caught it from his roommate, being locked down in there since February. He hadn’t been outside since February,” said Peterson, adding that she has contacted an attorney about taking legal action. “He’s not going to die in vain because he did ask for help. His roommate asked them for help. Then they put him in shackles after he died on the floor.”Gautz said Peterson has apparently been misinformed.He said Garrison nor his cellmate exhibited symptoms or complained of being ill before to the fatal episode. He said that the prison’s nursing staff had even gone cell-to-cell examining inmates prior to Garrison’s death.Gautz said that Garrison’s cellmate was immediately placed in quarantine and was tested for the virus. He said the test on the cellmate came back negative.“It speaks to the insidious nature of this virus that some people can have no symptoms at all and all of a sudden, just like that, they’re having these issues,” Gautz said. “It’s just very unfortunate.”Hundreds of prisoners test positive in MichiganHe said that 81 prisoners at the Macomb Correctional Facility, which houses about 1,300 inmates, had tested positive for the virus as of Monday night. He said no other coronavirus-linked deaths have occurred at the prison.Gautz said that of the 38,000 inmates in the entire state prison system, 574 had tested positive and 21 had died.Overall, Michigan had recorded more than 32,000 positive cases of the virus as of Tuesday and at least 2,700 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center.Gautz said the Department of Corrections is continuing to work to reduce the prison population, adding that 200 inmates are scheduled to be paroled this week and 700 to 900 others by the end of this month.“That’s just a little bit higher than average. We parole about 9,000 prisoners every year in general,” Gautz said.He said only about 5,000 prisoners are eligible for early parole.“Certainly every prisoner that we release, the parole board is first and foremost looking at whether or not they are going to be a harm to society if they’re released,” Gautz said. “[Garrison] certainly was not one that we were worried about committing new crimes and that’s why the board was happy to vote him out twice.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More →

Case Round up

first_imgImmigration minister: Get your sponsor licence applications in nowThe minister for future borders and immigration has advised employers wishing to continue to recruit skilled workers from abroad next… Related posts: Studying need not break chain of causationKhanum v IBC Vehicles Employment Lawyer 34, EAT• Khanum was dismissed in December 1996 and in October 1997, having beenunable to find alternative employment, began a degree course. The tribunal upheldher complaints of unfair dismissal and sex and race discrimination but heldthat starting the course broke the chain of causation and compensation wasassessed only to that date.Khanum’s appeal was upheld by the EAT. She had an apprenticeship with IBCthat would have led to a specialist job in an industry where IBC was dominant,and there was evidence IBC was blacklisting her. It was reasonable to assumethat because of the dismissal, she would need to re-train to find alternativework. The case was remitted to a tribunal to assess future losses, includingthose arising after she started the degree course.Accuser was within his rightsEveritt v British Telecommunications , IRLB 629, EAT• Everitt was dismissed for misconduct following his manager’s investigationinto his time-keeping. He pursued successful unfair dismissal and victimisationclaims.The tribunal held that BT had carried out a thorough investigation andgenuinely believed Everitt had been guilty of misconduct by falsifying his timesheets. There was no evidence he had been victimised by the manager.Everitt appealed, arguing that he should have had the opportunity toquestion the manager. The EAT dismissed the appeal.In deciding whether an employee has the right to question a person who makesallegations against him/her, all the circumstances must be considered. In thiscase, Everitt’s reason for questioning the manager was to establish hismotivation rather than the adequacy of the investigation. Providing Everitt wasaware of the allegations made against him and had an opportunity to respond, itwas not necessary for the manager to be available for questioning.When time starts running for an appealMock v Commissioners of the Inland Revenue IRLR 12, EAT• Mock was unsuccessful in his tribunal claim and intended to appeal againstthe decision. The EAT rules require that an appeal must be made within 42 daysfrom the date on which extended reasons of the decision were sent to theparties. Mock’s appeal was presented a day late and he was not allowed toproceed.He appealed, arguing that the time limit ran from the date he received theextended reasons, and allowing for postal delivery his appeal was in time. TheEAT disagreed. Time started to run when the extended reasons were transmittedto the parties. That was the date the tribunal decision was entered in theregister and the copy decision sent to the parties. Case Round upOn 11 Jan 2000 in Blacklisting, Personnel Today Comments are closed. Over 1,000 UK redundancies expected at G4S Cash SolutionsSecurity company G4S is planning to cut more than a quarter of jobs in its cash handling business amid the… Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Read More →

Assistant Professor

first_imgMission or Goal of Unit Posting DetailsEmployees hired into Administrative and Professional positionsposted on or after July 1, 2017, will be governed by and, ifemployed on July 1, 2018 will move into the new University HumanResources System. For additional information, go tohttp://greatplace.vcu.edu. Working TitleAssistant Professor Required Qualifications Type of SearchNational This position is an assistant/associate level position, non tenuretrack. The service, composed of two physicians and seven geneticcounselors provide primarily consultative services in the areas of,pediatric, adult, and cancer genetics, preconception andprenatal. Position Responsibilities Is this employee on a H1B Visa? Genetic evaluation and counseling of pediatric, adult and prenatalpatients with diverse genetic disorders including inborn errors ofmetabolism, birth defects, cancer genetics, and high riskpregnancies. The evaluations may occur on the MCVP campus, MCVPsatellite sites and other locations as required to provide clinicalservices.Managing and participating in call with other departmentphysicians.Teaching genetic counseling, medical, other healthcare students andresidents.Participation in Department’s telemedicine initiatives. Date Posted09/01/2017 • M.D. with American Board of Medical Genetics ( ABMG )eligible/certification.• Dynamic and innovative leadership skills in supervision ofclinical service and teaching/training of graduate students.• Demonstrated experience working in and fostering a diversefaculty, staff, and student environment or commitment to do so as afaculty member at VCU . * How did you find out about this position?Alumni association magazineChronicle of Higher EducationCommunity eventEmail notificationHERC (Higher Ed Recruitment Consortium)Higher education publicationInternal RecruiterJob fairJob site (e.g. Monster.com)ListservNewspaperProfessional association/journalReferred by person/employeeSearch firm notificationVCU vacancy listing – eJobsOther Preferred Qualifications Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Position NumberF09230 School/UnitSchool of Medicine The Virginia Commonwealth University Department of Human andMolecular Genetics provides multifaceted clinical and researchactivities focusing on current important areas of medical and basicresearch. Our 24 faculty members conduct research, clinical andeducational activities at the VCU Medical Center, the VirginiaInstitute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics and the VCUInstitute of Molecular Medicine. Position TypeClinical MD 100% MCVP Only FT Number of Months12 Posted Salary Proposed Hire Date10/16/2017 • Teaching experience at the undergraduate or graduate level. Diversity Statement Information Application Deadline Date Application Process/Additional Information Tenure StatusNon-Tenure Eligible * If you selected ‘Other’ for your referral source pleaseindicate where you heard about this posting. (If you did not select’Other,’ please enter ‘n/a.’)(Open Ended Question) Applicants should send a brief letter of interest and a currentcurriculum vitae. VCU is an equal opportunity, affirmative actionuniversity providing access to education and employment withoutregard to age, race, color, national origin, gender, religion,sexual orientation, veteran’s status, political affiliation ordisability. RankAssistant Professor Quick Linkhttps://www.vcujobs.com/postings/66154 Open Until FilledYes DepartmentHuman & Molecular Genetics Applicant DocumentsRequired Documents Optional DocumentsCover Letter/Letter of ApplicationCurriculum Vitae (CV) Grant funded position?No Chief purpose of this position in support of above mission orgoallast_img read more

Read More →

Woman, 29, charged in connection with deadly chain reaction crash in South Bend

first_img By Jon Zimney – June 30, 2020 0 646 Pinterest Previous articleOnly pro baseball in Indiana this summer likely to be in South BendNext articleMotorcyclist killed in Kosciusko County crash Monday Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Woman, 29, charged in connection with deadly chain reaction crash in South Bend Twitter Google+ Google+ WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews (Photo supplied/ABC 57) A woman has been charged in the chain-reaction rear-end crash that killed two people and injured several others in South Bend.The collision happened just before 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 28, at Lincoln Way West and Bendix Drive when the driver of a Chrysler 200 allegedly rear-ended a Saturn Ion. This caused a chain reaction crash when the Saturn Ion was pushed into a Chevy Trax, which pushed the Trax into a Ford Focus. The Ford Focus then was pushed into a BMW 750.The drivers of the Ion, Trax, Focus, and BMW were waiting on Lincoln Way West, all in the eastbound lane, for the light to turn when the collision occurred.The driver of the Chrysler 200 was taken to the hospital with non life-threatening injuries.The driver of the second car, the Saturn Ion, identified as a 44-year-old man, was taken to the hospital and at last information was in critical condition.The Ion’s front seat passenger, Tajuanna Norris, 47, was pronounced deceased at the scene. The rear passenger side passenger of the Ion, identified as Tony Griffin, 37, was also pronounced deceased at the scene. A fourth occupant of the Ion, the rear driver side passenger, identified as A 5-year-old boy, was taken to the hospital and at last information was in critical condition.Raeaunna White is charged with two counts of reckless homicide, two counts of reckless driving, one count of false information, and one count driving while suspended.White is currently hospitalized for injuries suffered in the crash. Facebook WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

Read More →

Boosting bread among the young

first_imgAs part of the #WeLoveBread campaign British Baker filmed a Grain Chain masterclass for teachers.Reporter Bronya Smolen attended a class for teachers across the county at The Piggott School in Reading demonstrating how to make bread and how to get children involved and excited about the process of it.The class was run by Janet Carr, baker and owner of Reading-based business, Warings Bakery. Watch the video below to see how the teachers got on, and what they thought about getting kids involved with bread-making.Grain Chain is run by the Flour Advisory Bureau (FAB), part of National Association of British and Irish Millers (nabim), the HGCA and the Federation of Bakers and was set up with the aim of helping teach children the importance and provenance of grain-based food, as well as how to cook with it.Are you promoting bread or are you a professional baker teaching classes? If so, British Baker would love to hear from you. Email us via [email protected] or tweet us at @BritishBaker.You can also support the #WeLoveBread campaign by showing us your latest bakes on #LoveBreadFridays.last_img read more

Read More →