Frank Zappa’s Hollywood Hills Estate Has Been Sold Off For Over $5 Million

first_imgAfter being listed by the Zappa Family Trust earlier this summer, the late Frank Zappa‘s Laurel Canyon home has sold for $5.25 million. The beautiful compound, contained on a relatively small half-acre of land in the Hollywood Hills, was purchased by Zappa in the late 60’s for just $74,000 and came under the ownership of his family after his death in 1993. The faux-Tudor house (built in the late 1930’s) boasts six bedrooms and seven bathrooms in 6,759 square-feet of multi-level living space, and features a variety of quirky embellishments,like the dragon mural in the formal dining room, porthole windows and doors salvaged from vintage submarines. It also features various architecturally unusual reading nooks and creative work spaces. In addition to the main house, the land also includes two architecturally adventurous detached guest houses and an additional attached guest apartment. Other features of note include a double-height art gallery with parquet flooring, Zappa’s sprawling recording studio, and “The Vault,” a storage chamber beneath the house where Zappa kept his private archives under lock and key during his lifetime. The terraced, tree-shaded grounds include a hodgepodge of decks and patios, a greenhouse, swimming pool, roof top tennis court, and lush gardens with mosaic accents. The sale of the house is another step in the ever-contentious disputes between the surviving Zappas regarding control over and rights to the Zappa Family Trust. You can see a gallery of photos of the house here.last_img read more

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The New Mastersounds’ Eddie Roberts Talks Standing Rock & Social Responsibility Of A Musician

first_imgLast week, The New Mastersounds donated half of their recent show proceeds to the Stand With Standing Rock cause. The donation was the direct result of encountering the tragic situation firsthand, witnessing law enforcement training with riot gear in the parking lot of their Minnesota hotel. Not wanting to stand idly by, guitarist Eddie Roberts goes in depth about the decision, and the fine line between musician and social commentator in this new editorial.“Shut up and play!” Does today’s musician have a role in social and political commentary?In an age where everyone with a smart phone is sharing and commenting on their political viewpoints, is it right that a musician with thousands of followers does the same thing, or is that an abuse of influence?‘Politics v Humanitarian’I am very careful about what I post on social media, and I make a clear distinction between my personal, artist, and band pages. I am very careful not to force my political or religious viewpoints onto the band’s social media. For example, I would share a Bernie Sanders story on my personal page, but not The New Mastersounds page. It’s not my place to speak on behalf of the whole band on a political matter.The simple reason is, not all the members of the band share my views. However, when the band unanimously agrees on a point, we consider speaking out.Last week, we made a stand against the Dakota Access Pipeline, and here’s why:  Firstly, we all agree what is going on at Standing Rock is a humanitarian issue, not a political one. We value freedom of speech and the right to peacefully protest, and we do not condone the use of excessive violence against anyone who exercises those rights.Secondly, again, this situation is not political. This is corporatism, where oil investment is being valued over human life, where profit is being valued over people. The fact that Trump has a huge stake in the pipeline, and that Obama has done little to speak out about it, shows the situation is not politically motivated. Both sides are in it for the money.A third point is that we, as a band, are free to do whatever we want with our money. In the same way the ticket-buying public doesn’t get to choose what food we buy, we don’t need the consent of the ticket-buying public to donate our money from our shows. That being said, of the thousands of views, likes, shares and positive comments on our Standing Rock post, I only saw two negative comments. One said, “Thanks for the empty gesture,” and the other literally said, “Shut up and just play music. I give U money to hear music, not politics.” I could counter that with, “Shut up and listen.” What gives this person more right to comment than I do? The last time I checked, paying us to play music doesn’t confer the right to censor our opinions. I’m not a performing monkey.“I don’t care about your politics”When it comes to my personal page, I share and say whatever I please, because it is that, a personal page, the same as anyone else’s. If someone were to comment questioning my right to share my personal views because I am “just a musician”, then I would politely point out that they are on the wrong page, and should be following my artist page instead of my personal one. Obviously, not all my friends share the exact same views as me, but we all have the right to discuss our opinions with each other, as friends.Social responsibilityAs musicians, we have dedicated ourselves to a way of life. We have a vocation, and we can’t really separate ourselves, the music we make, or our opinions and viewpoints. It’s all one thing. And, as musicians, do we not have a social responsibility anyway? There is a long tradition of music’s involvement in politics and social issues: anti-war commentary, Live Aid-style fundraising for famines caused by war and foreign policy, black civil rights, women’s rights, etc. Does anyone look back on Jimi Hendrix and say, “How dare he comment on the Vietnam War?” No. He’s remembered as an important voice for peace in that time. Was that the case at the time? Or is it just looking back, when we see the right and wrong side of history? I think we’d all agree the majority of musicians take a liberal, left-wing standpoint. Is this because we’re in the business of spreading Love and Joy, not Hate and Fear?One last question I’d like to raise is: In this current climate, are less people likely to attend a show if it’s billed as a fundraiser? My personal experience with The Payback* suggests this is so, that it’s a hindrance for a show to be advertised as a benefit. For some reason, there is lower attendance at the shows I’ve organized as fundraisers than there is for my regular shows, even when the benefit shows are piled high with coveted guests and receive much more press coverage.Why is this? Have benefit shows become a victim of cynicism?  “Where does the money really go? How much of it actually gets donated? Is this just a publicity stunt?” If it was a show you’d normally go to see, does it matter where the profit goes? Are you actively against the benefiting principal, or are you just sick of being told what you should care about? Should it be up to the musicians to divert the profit they make, either to their own pockets or to a non-profit they choose? Do you ask your bank where it invests your money? Most often, benefits are not even politically motivated, and they benefit humanitarian, non-partisan organizations. Homelessness isn’t politics. Standing Rock isn’t politics. They are by products of corporate-driven policies.Helping our fellow man is humanitarian, and personally, I won’t just shut up and play!*For more information about The Payback, Eddie’s Non-profit organization that raises money through concerts for urban homeless families with children and young adults, please head here.For a donation to Standing Rock, head here.Catch Eddie Roberts and The New Mastersounds crew this Friday, December 2nd at Terminal 5 alongside the funk army Turkuaz! Details here.[Photo Credit: Tony Dellacioppa]last_img read more

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Lessons in boldness

first_imgOne day last month, a dozen high school students stood before Karina Contreras, M.L.A. ’14, as she gestured to several wires hanging vertically inside the Graduate School of Design (GSD). Contreras explained that the students would use tinfoil, construction paper, spaghetti, and the wires to improvise a freestyle design.“Your design will be inspired by the music I’m going to play,” Contreras said. “The music will influence the design, which will change based on each new track. Make sense?”The out-of-the-box exercise was part of Project Link, a four-week program that immerses 10th- through 12th-grade students from Greater Boston in the world of design. Since Project Link’s inception, program leaders have targeted regional high schools that don’t have art or architecture programs.“Project Link evolved from two GSD alumni in particular — Jonathan Evans ’10 and Andy Lantz ’10 — who wanted to encourage more minority participation in the field,” said Julian Bushman-Copp, M.Arch. ’12, who has worked with the program for three years. “They realized that you could only do that by educating students about design at a younger age. Project Link is meant to be the link between high school and design education at the collegiate level.”Participants in the program, which is funded by GSD, spend about three weeks on Harvard’s campus, learning drawing, modeling, and representation techniques associated with architectural design, as well as design perspectives of landscape architecture, urban planning, graphic and industrial design, and the fine arts.Wendy Crizabel Guzman presents her model, which was part ballet studio, part fitness center, and part residential building, to a panel of current and former GSD students. She is a student at Phoenix Charter Academy. Andy Ismael Paul stands in the background.Robert Murray, a sophomore from the John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science in Roxbury, has gained hands-on experience in a field he has a passion for.“I tried to do architecture on my own, but never had any training, as my school didn’t have any architecture programs,” he said. “I’ve been wanting to do architectural engineering for a while, and the program’s really opened my eyes in that respect — it’s not just about designing buildings, but the process you go through to do that.”Said James Joutras, a sophomore at Weston High School: “I like the fact that you can have such artistic creativity. The teachers have done a great job, and the fact that we’re able to come to Harvard and study here is really nice. It’s a privilege.”The students, said Dasha Ortenberg, M.Arch. ’13, “have skills and understand concepts that I didn’t even understand until I was in graduate school. I really hope that they are both able to improve those skills and [to] learn a new way of thinking about design — that they can take that with them as they continue their education.”The benefits of the program extend to team leaders.“Teaching design is a whole new challenge, and I love it,” Bushman-Copp said. “I’ve often thought that teaching was something I would pursue personally later on, so this has been a great experience in that respect.“For Contreras, whose career in architecture was inspired by a summer course experience as a high school student in California, the program is an opportunity to give back. “That university summer program really helped me because I wasn’t, at the time, very art-driven,” she said. “But it allowed me to submit a portfolio for architecture school at USC, where I got my undergraduate degree.“I really am glad that Harvard does this,” Contreras said. “It’s nice to know that Harvard is reaching out to new generations to help students get involved and really expand their horizons. I think it’s important to carry on that tradition.”Adjusting his design, Murray said, “Architecture has no limits. As long as it’s controlled in the sense that people can live in the building, you can make it however you want, using whatever process works best. It can go as grand as you want it to go. “last_img read more

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3 money tips you shouldn’t always listen to

first_imgWe often get advice from people we know, and it’s usually good advice. Sometimes, the advice isn’t as good. Sometimes, the advice is a pail of hot garbage. Here are a few money tips you may want to think about before you go all-in on them.Use your credit card to build good creditSure, that’s one way to do it. Using a credit card responsibly isn’t necessarily a bad idea. If you use a credit card for a few small purchases and pay it off every month, you should be in pretty good shape. Just make sure you’re not spending uncontrollably. If you find you have no discipline when it comes to credit spending, it’s time to get rid of that card. Or at least freeze it in a block of ice.Renting is a waste of money. Buy a house!Purchasing a house can be a great idea. If you’re planning on living in a certain area for a while, or you find a mortgage that is WAY cheaper than your rent, it could be a great idea to buy a house. But, if you don’t like your job or the city you live in, it could be a horrible idea.Debt can be goodIt’s often said that debt like student loans or a mortgage are “good debt” because, in the long run, they can put you in a better place financially. The problem lies with how you choose to pay it off. Debt is debt. No matter the shape, pay it off as fast as you can. Don’t pay the minimum because it’s “good debt.” You don’t want to still be paying those student loans off 30 years later. 92SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Westminster UDP OK

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‘COVID-19 is real’, govt says as public denial persists

first_imgIndonesia has recorded nearly 10,000 fatalities and 252,923 total cases as of Tuesday. “If some people deny the presence of COVID-19 [and neglect health measures], transmission will continue,” Doni said.Some Indonesian citizens, including public figures, have endorsed conspiracy theories about the pandemic. Bali-based musician Jerinx, for example, claimed that the recorded number of COVID-19 infections was being manipulated to be larger than it actually was. He has also ignored authorities’ calls for social distancing and mask wearing, including while participating in a rally in late July to protest against COVID-19 testing requirements for travel to Bali.The Bali Police have named the musician a suspect for defamation after he accused the Indonesian Medical Association (IDI) of being “the WHO’s flunkey” for mandating that women preparing to give birth be tested for COVID-19.Topics : At least five behavioral change units consisting of a total of 100 volunteers have been deployed in five subdistricts of the capital to inform people about the virus and reinforce the need to adhere to health protocols.“If the initiative works, we will develop it in other regions as well,” Doni said during a meeting with the House of Representatives on Tuesday. “COVID-19 is real and has claimed nearly a million of lives globally.”Doni did not reveal the details of the Health Ministry survey he cited during the meeting.Read also: 160 deaths in one day: Indonesia sets bleak virus record A recent survey by the Health Ministry has found that many citizens do not believe that COVID-19 exists and that many have challenged the call to adhere to health protocols, the national COVID-19 task force has said.In response, the task force has formed so-called “behavioral change” units. They consist of members of the community, the military and local administrations and seek to raise public awareness about the dangers of COVID-19. National COVID-19 task force head Doni Monardo said the initiative would be tested first in Jakarta, a hotbed of coronavirus contagion, before being brought to other regions.last_img read more

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Washington DC, heart of US power, frozen by pandemic

first_imgWith just a month to go before the presidential election, Washington, the hub of American politics, is still in the social and economic deep freeze it was plunged into by the Covid-19 outbreak that began six months ago.The 12,000 people due to take part in upcoming meets at the World Bank and IMF will not stroll the sidewalks of the spruced-up city center, which before the pandemic had been touted as example of the regeneration of US downtowns.Instead, they will be sitting at home, in front of their laptops. As well as its political activities, the city had billed itself in the past two decades as a hub for international conventions and conferences. Before the pandemic, “we were experiencing record attendance and visitation to Washington, not only with congresses and meetings, but of course, also with the leisure market… and the international markets,” said Elliott Ferguson, director of Destination DC. And that activity all stoked the local economy. “We were on pace to do well over 25 million visitors to the city, over 42 large congresses,” he said. Now the city is expecting some 11 million visitors.Working from home For sure, some of the trendier districts of the city have bounced back to life. Restaurants have opened up outdoor terraces and rooftop dining and have started to fill up in the late summer, thanks to local clientele.But in the downtown area, not far from the White House, the fast food restaurants of K Street — the central artery where busy lobbyists and lawyers used to grab lunch — have not re-opened and struggle to attract local business.That is because the thousands of government and institutional workers — including the 9,000 of the World Bank, excluding its consultants — are all working from home until the end of the year.The white-collar workers who filled the offices of the nerve center of US and international politics have overwhelmingly chosen to carry on with remote work.And they have the backing of Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser, who has implemented one of the strictest regimes of restrictions in the country to keep the virus death toll down to 629 deaths and more than 12,250 infections.Empty hotels As a result, by the end of July the economic activity of the city center was just 12 percent of what it had been the year before, with 95 percent of employees working from home, according to Downtown D.C Business Improvement District. Hotel occupancy was at just eight percent in June, down from 74 percent in February.An employee of the pharmacy chain CVS, just a few yards from the IMF building, said the branch was probably doomed if the big institutions do not open up their doors again soon.Handing out at best 200 prescriptions per week instead of more than 1,000 before the pandemic, and with its opening hours tailored to those of the neighboring institutions, the employee said the store would be lucky to hang on for six months.”I’m afraid CVS will have to close this location if they don’t come back to work downtown,” the worker said, asking to be named.Despite the gloomy mood, Gregory O’Dell, head of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, the mainstay of the city’s conferences, hopes there will be better days ahead.The Center, which receives some 1.5 million people each year, reopened two weeks ago, unveiling a variety of sophisticated equipment designed to help ward off the virus.Artificial intelligence The convention center in the heart of Washington has been fitted with scanners that take the temperature of visitors.Interior surfaces are frequently sprayed with disinfectant capable of killing the virus.And artificial intelligence monitors visitors and registers if they are getting too close to each and ignoring social distancing guidelines.The cancellation of 93 events this year left the center with steep losses, totally $345.5 million.”Today, more than ever before, is such an important time for people and communities to come together, and conventions and meetings, sports and entertainment have the power to do that, even virtually,” said O’Dell.And if people start to get a taste for all things virtual??”I don’t think we’re getting used to it,” said Elliott Ferguson. “I think we are very much so missing out on the opportunity to connect in person.””It’s very difficult to get someone interested in your product, or whatever your prototype is,” he said. “We need to touch it, we need to feel it.”Topics : Behind the giant bay windows of the World Bank, security guards remain at their posts, but idle. Outside, the sidewalks of Washington DC are largely empty.The bank is open, ready to host but its twice annual meetings with international financial institutions. But the meetings are all virtual these days.Next door, at the HQ2 building of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) a sign says “temporarily closed.” It has been hanging there for six months. last_img read more

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Sofregaz nets Taichung LNG expansion FEED from CPC

first_imgImage: Sofregaz The engineering company did not provide any additional details. Taiwan’s CPC has awarded French Sofregaz the front-end engineering and design contract for the third expansion phase of its Taichung LNG import terminal. The expansion added three new LNG storage tanks with a capacity of 160,000 cbm, each, and related regasification facilities. The import facility now has six storage tanks and a regasification capacity of more than 5 million tonnes per year. The country imported 16.66 million tonnes in 2019, a slight decrease of 0.9 percent compared to the year before, according to GIIGNL data. Sofregaz said that the project completion is scheduled for 2026. Taiwan is the world’s fifth largest LNG importer and it is looking to boost the use of the chilled fuel as it phases out nuclear and coal to generate electricity. Worth mentioning here, Taiwan’s CPC completed the second expansion phase at the Taichung terminal in 2019. CPC is also upgrading its Yung-An LNG terminal in Kaohsiung and is building a third terminal in northern Taiwan. Besides the FEED, the deal also includes project management consultancy (PMC) services, Sofregaz said in a statement. Phase 3 expansion will see the addition of two LNG storage tanks and associated regasification facilities. These volumes mostly came from Australia, Qatar, and Malaysia.last_img read more

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Lund goes 2-for-2 at 281 with second Lone Star Tour victory

first_imgLund posted back-to-back checkers by making a strong run on the outside groove. The top five in the fleet IMCA Sunoco Stock Car field represented as many different states, as Elijah Zevenber­gen, Hesston Shaw, Dean Abbey and Joe Bellm chased Lund across the stripe. STEPHENVILLE, Texas (Feb. 18) – The top line took Curt Lund to his second $750 Sniper Speed Lone Star Tour feature win in as many nights Monday at 281 Speedway. Justin Nabors and James Hanusch completed the SportMod top three. William Creese was the runner-up and Harold Clifton finished third in the Sport Compact feature. Southern SportMods – 1. Gregory Muirhead; 2. Justin Nabors; 3. James Hanusch; 4. Taylor Florio; 5. Larry Underwood; 6. James McCreery; 7. Jay Coone; 8. Evan Moore. Gregory Muirhead and Clifton Whisenant both raced from eighth starting spots to win the Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMod and Mach-1 Sport Compact main events, respectively.  Lund had started third and dropped back a couple spots. He worked his way back toward the front, taking over the lead for good on lap 10. center_img Feature Results  Stock Cars – 1. Curt Lund; 2. Elijah Zevenbergen; 3. Hesston Shaw; 4. Dean Abbey; 5. Joe Bellm; 6. Dean Cornlius; 7. Jeffrey Abbey; 8. Westin Abbey; 9. Tyler Muirhead; 10. Jason Rogers; 11. Shelby Williams; 12. Kirk Martin; 13. G.W. Egbert IV; 14. William Gould; 15. Billy Wade; 16. Kyle Falck; 17. Tony Hardesty; 18. Jason Josselyn; 19. Ryan Powers; 20. Kyle Pfeifer; 21. Craig Moss.  Sport Compacts – 1. Clifton Whisenant; 2. William Creese; 3. Harold Clifton; 4. Pamela Whisenant; 5. Steven Bevils; 6. Kody Crofutt; 7. Howard Watson; 8. Ryan Whisenant; 9. Brian Schoenbaum Jr.; 10. Anthony Vandenberg; 11. Kaleb Watson. Curt Lund won his second Sniper Speed Lone Star Tour feature Monday at 281 Speedway. The IMCA Sunoco Stock Car checkers were good for $750. (Photo by Stacy Kolar, Southern Sass Photography)last_img read more

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