This Amazing Animated Film Is Packed With Phish, Bowie & Star Wars References

first_imgGearing up for Summer Tour, fellow Phish fan Nick Setteducato has shared an animated music video called “2016: A Space Oddity,” featuring hundreds of Phish references, as well as references to David Bowie, Star Wars, and Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. The five-minute video follows a characterized Jon Fishman as he launches off to space with purpose of destroying an incoming asteroid. He ends up getting lost in battle versus a puppy-led alien spaceship, and ultimately lands himself in Mike Gordon‘s cereal bowl.While the four members are not necessarily playing themselves in the short film, the stop-motion video entertains on several levels and is worth watching below:Setteducato’s production follows his 2014 project, Flight Of The Mockingbird, which you can also watch below:You can follow his creations on Lucy’s Place Productions Facebook page, where he shares updates on his projects. He also encourages fans to donate to the Mockingbird Foundation, a non-profit organization founded by Phish fans in 1996 to generate charitable proceeds from the Phish community.JamBase sat down with Setteducato to talk about how he became inspired to work on this Phish-centered universe. “The video I made back in 2014, Flight of the Mockingbird, was just a fun way for me to learn the process of making a short stop-motion video, and to combine that with my unhealthy Phish obsession,” he explains. “This new video is really just an extension of that. I was very encouraged by the positive response to that first video, so I thought I’d try something a little more ambitious for the next one. I settled on this idea of an absurd, surreal, space adventure inspired by episodes of the great ’60s British TV series Thunderbirds, and set to a short, upbeat instrumental track. The ideas just flowed from there. Maybe another Phish song? Maybe a killer asteroid or a wormhole, and a “Big Black Furry Creature From Mars”? Maybe Fishman is the pilot, and maybe he ends up in a giant bowl of cereal? You know, the usual stuff… Also, my dog Otis Redding makes a cameo as the alien.”What an incredibly artistic way to spend your free time![via JamBase]last_img read more

Read More →

Immersed in the body politic

first_imgWhen Susan Greenhalgh says she studies “biopolitics,” one might imagine a form of futuristic, dystopian science.But Greenhalgh’s interests are hardly that. As the newest professor of anthropology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, she explores the ways in which policies are shaping how we use and view our bodies here and now. Her work marries large-scale scientific initiatives, from China’s controversial one-child policy to America’s new war on obesity, with the small-scale stories of human lives.Greenhalgh, a native of central Maine, never even took an anthropology course in her years at Wellesley College. But during her senior year, she decided to spend a year off traveling before graduate school.“I didn’t want to be a little rat running around on a treadmill in a cage, without having seen the world,” she said. Mainland China was still closed off to outsiders, so Greenhalgh spent several months in Nepal, where she absorbed the stories of Tibetans who had recently fled China over the Himalayas. That experience — combined with the influence of Margaret Mead’s autobiography “Blackberry Winter” — sold her on anthropology and China studies.The late 1970s was a pivotal time to be a China observer in the West. As Greenhalgh studied for her doctorate in anthropology at Columbia University, China was undergoing an economic and political opening up. After finishing her Ph.D. in 1982, Greenhalgh took a job at the New York–based Population Council as “an anthropologist, policy analyst, and resident China hand,” a fortuitous position that allowed her to travel often and eventually carve out a niche as an authority on the new one-child policy.“There were so many exposés in the American media of the horrific implementation of the one-child policy,” she said. “But almost nobody who was talking about it in the media had any intimate knowledge of China.”She seized the opportunity to counter the dominant Western narrative that Chinese citizens were uniformly coerced into complying with the one-child rule. While atrocities did and still do occur — a round of forced sterilization in the 1980s, abandonment of baby girls, the continued abortion of female fetuses — China’s grappling with its one-child policy has been more nuanced than most Americans realize.“The Chinese state is nothing if not clever and strategic, and brilliant in terms of displaying various forms of statecraft,” she said.Surprisingly, the one-child rule was borne of a selective faith in Western science, as Greenhalgh documented in her best-known book, “Just One Child: Science and Policy in Deng’s China.” The strict policy was the brainchild of a Chinese military scientist, who discovered a set of Western cybernetics equations and applied them to population control.“The usual population experts were silenced,” she said. “It was a gigantic political struggle, in which the power of the military triumphed.”While China originally thought its population growth would hinder economic development, Greenhalgh argues, Communist Party leaders now see their increasingly well-educated, billion-strong workforce as a boon. The one-child policy has slowly morphed from an instrument to bring down birthrates into a more comprehensive social policy that addresses the well-being of women, the migration from the countryside to the cities, and the problem of an imbalanced society with 120 young men for every 100 young women.“China’s very keen to push the nation into the information economy of the 21st century, and it’s trying to promote what it calls scientific citizens,” she said. “From the beginning, it was about not just limiting quantity, but also raising the quality of the Chinese people.”But China is hardly alone in trying to shape the physical and moral character of its people, she maintains. Greenhalgh’s latest work looks at what she calls the new American ideal of “the fit, trim, biocitizen,” created by a constant stream of messages from medical scientists, government leaders, and public health officials.“This public discourse about the obesity epidemic has intensified people’s concerns about their bodies, because weight is now a bona fide ‘disease,’ and weight loss has become a matter of official government policy,” she said. This summer she will publish her first article on the subject, an ethnography of overweight young people in southern California — “the epicenter of the cult of the perfect body” — that looks at their experiences with the constant pressure to lose weight.“It’s one of the greatest biopolitical injustices of our time,” she said.Her interest in the “medicalization” of American life stems in part from her own experiences. In the mid-1990s, when Greenhalgh had just moved across the country to teach at the University of California, Irvine, she was misdiagnosed with fibromyalgia, an incurable syndrome characterized by mysterious full-body pain. She underwent a series of therapies, including medication that caused horrible headaches and cognitive dysfunction.What was worse, she said, was the feeling that her life would be forever altered by the diagnosis. A sports fanatic, she was told to give up in-line skating, kayaking, swimming, hiking, and other activities that she enjoyed so she could lessen the pain. When she finally sought a second opinion — which concluded that her symptoms of fibromyalgia had in fact been produced by the treatments — the veil lifted.“My life can be divided into two parts: before and after,” she said. The experience became the basis for “Under the Medical Gaze,” in which she turned the tools of ethnography on her own life. She saw the book as a way to reclaim her story from the doctor who tried to rewrite it — an all-too-common side effect of the often lopsided power dynamic between physician and patient.She now shares that story with her undergraduate students in a course called “The Woman and the Body,” which she has taught alongside her China courses for the past 15 years. Whether her focus is China’s unmarriageable men, overweight American teenagers, or even her own past, Greenhalgh hopes to demonstrate anthropology’s power to bring unheard or marginalized narratives to the fore.“Students love hearing other people’s stories,” she said. “It’s a very powerful way of teaching things people remember.”last_img read more

Read More →

For professors who have taught at Extension School, Zoom is an old friend

first_img Related Early responses indicate shift to online classes going well overall Some running into minor hitches, but others finding surprising benefits Graduating med students given early degree chance to help in hospitals Four years ago, Harvard Extension School officials asked senior preceptor in Romance languages and literatures María Luisa Parra-Velasco to teach an online version of her popular course on artist Frida Kahlo using Zoom, then a little-known video-conferencing platform.At first, Parra-Velasco was reluctant because she didn’t want to miss the face-to-face contact with students, but eventually she gave in. And now that the College has moved classes online for the rest of the semester she’s glad she did, particularly since much of the teaching will be done over Zoom.“It was great to see the students again,” she said after meeting with students in her “Spanish in the Community” class via Zoom on Tuesday. “It’s not the same as an in-person class, but everybody was engaged and eager to participate. I’m glad the Extension School asked me to do an online course four years ago. Right now, it certainly has served me a great deal.”Parra-Velasco is among a large number of Harvard faculty who are benefiting from having worked with the Division of Continuing Education (DCE), a unit of the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, which offers nearly three quarters of its courses, about 900 offerings, that can be taken online, mostly through the Harvard Extension School. Because more than half of the Extension School instructors are Harvard faculty or College affiliates, many are already familiar with Zoom.It should come as no surprise.Since it was founded in 1910, the Extension School has been a place for experimentation and innovation, said Henry H. Leitner, its interim dean and chief innovation officer. An early adopter of technology, the Extension School began offering online courses in 1997.The first online courses were lectures captured on video, and as digital learning evolved, the School has continued to invest in new technologies. In 2009, it began teaching courses using a web-conference platform called Elluminate Live, which was replaced by Zoom in 2016. Each semester, the School offers about 350 Zoom-based courses.“We’ve been doing online learning for a long time,” said Leitner, who teaches computer science courses both at the College and the Extension School. “And we’re happy to share our experience with online teaching and learning and extend a helping hand to Harvard more broadly.” “It gets easier. Once things settle in, it really becomes about the students and not about the actual platform. Teaching online is not so different than teaching in a classroom.” — Adrienne Phelps-Coco Virtual Match Day captures joy, purpose for HMS 2020 graduates From envelopes to emails In fact, DCE staff shared recommendations on how to teach online, build community in online courses, set up help desks, and monitor Zoom sessions with the Harvard Initiative for Teaching and Learning Consortium.Experience with the technology helps with the pedagogy, but it’s also useful when it comes to advising people, most commonly about frustrations with the learning curve. DCE staffers know that most Extension School instructors who have used Zoom for their online classes have difficulties in the beginning, but after about two weeks the majority report being pleased with the new technology. A professor who teaches a big lecture class and tried Zoom for an Extension class said he loved it because he could see his students as if “all of them were in the front row.”“It gets easier,” said Adrienne Phelps-Coco, executive director of teaching and learning at DCE. “Once things settle in, it really becomes about the students and not about the actual platform. Teaching online is not so different than teaching in a classroom.”Both Leitner and Phelps-Coco feel optimistic about the College’s move to online learning and look forward to its potential impact on the future of online instruction. “It is an unprecedented situation in online learning,” said Phelps-Coco. “And this is something that’s happening on a global scale that has never happened before; to be able to keep education going during a time of massive disruption. And that’s pretty extraordinary. Even if it’s not perfect, it’s still amazing.”For Ivy Livingston, who teaches Latin, both at the College and the Extension School, the main concern was keeping students engaged throughout the two-hour class period. In her regular class, she often has students work in groups or participate in quizzes or reading aloud activities, but she looks forward to learning from the experience of teaching online.“I’m kind of excited about teaching online and I’m looking forward to trying new tools,” said Livingston. “I’ve been asked by the Extension School to teach Latin online, and I’ve always said, ‘No, no, no.’ Now that I’ve been forced to do it, I’m eager to see how it works because I’d love for more people to take Latin, and if offering an online option is the way, that’d be great.” An option to serve in COVID-19 fight The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. As for Parra-Velasco, already having experience with Zoom has given her a hand up. Instead of worrying about technical difficulties, she is more focused on adapting her course online, reducing the amount of reading and redesigning class activities. Instead of sending students to practice their language skills in community organizations in East Boston and Dorchester, now she’s asking students to write reports on Spanish-speaking online community groups.Of her first Zoom class at the College, Parra-Velasco had only one complaint.“It was hard to be sitting down while teaching for three hours,” she said. “Next time, I’ll be standing up.”last_img read more

Read More →

How to Camp With an Infant

first_imgDear Mountain Mama,Last night I saw just a few fireflies blinking and it struck me that summer is coming to an end. Along with smelling honeysuckle, hearing crickets, and eating wild blackberries, sleeping under the stars is one of my summer time favorites.The only thing keeping me from packing up the car is my baby girl. Have you ever taken an infant camping? Is camping worth the extra effort? And do you have any tips to share?Yours,Craving Tent Time————————————————————————————Dear Craving Tent Time,Of course you’re craving tent time. Just because you became a parent, doesn’t mean that you should stop doing the things you love. Besides, taking your baby camping will serve her well later in life.Our children watch us closely. If we want them to spend time outdoors, we have to do the same. If we believe free time should be spent hiking up mountains, kayaking down rivers, and splashing about in creeks, then we need to show our kids our values by living them. By our example, we present our children with a version of adult life that is fun and worth following.When my son was nine months old, I wondered whether it was worth the effort to take him camping. People told me to take a portable playpen, a stroller, a baby backpack, a highchair, toys, and extra clothes. The thought of having to pack all this extra gear seemed daunting. And then there was the tent setting up part. In the end, I threw my camping bin, a baby carrier, diapers and clothes, a cooler, and infant bug spray and sunscreen into my truck. That was it.When it comes to camping with small ones, I personally live by the motto “less is more.” Who needs toys when there’s dirt to eat and tarps to crinkle? My motto not only applies to camping gear, but also to activities once you arrive at the campground. My son and I didn’t go on long hikes. Strolls around the campground visiting with other campers provided plenty of entertainment. Our biggest adventure was splashing in a small creek one afternoon.It took extra work to take my boy camping. He cried on the way there. I wondered, is this worth it? I struggled to hold him while putting up the tent. I wondered, is this worth it? I felt like I was constantly taking leaves and sticks and ashes out of his mouth. I wondered, is this worth it?But when I look back at the pictures of his filthy face, giggling face poking out of the tent, I know the answer is yes, every time.Craving Tent Time, go out there and get your camping fix. Even if your baby girl doesn’t remember this trip, she’ll look back at the photos of her camping as a baby and know that sleeping in a tent is something she does.Enjoy!Mountain Mamalast_img read more

Read More →

Best Turkey Trot Runs for Thanksgiving in the Blue Ridge

first_imgWith Halloween long gone and most of the leaves already red-brown on the ground, November is suddenly here and it’s only a short time before the most bountiful holiday of the American calendar year.But one side dish that has become as unique a part of the Thanksgiving celebration as cranberry sauce and the Macy’s Day parade is the Turkey Trot.Depending on your location, a Turkey Trot can range anywhere from a brisk 5K to an all-out marathon. But what all these races have in common is that they are held on Thanksgiving with the goals of both raising money for charity and burning last minute calories before the big meal.Here are six top Turkey Trots happening Thanksgiving morning throughout the Blue Ridge.Boar’s Head Turkey Trotboars-head-turkey-trot 2If you’re a central Virginia resident, you can work up a Thanksgiving day appetite by joining the Boar’s Head Turkey Trot. In true Charlottesville tradition, the Boar’s Head Inn hosts the University town’s 33rd annual Turkey Trot to raise money for UVA Children’s Hospital new Battle Building complex. The one 5K race can be run or walked and begins at 9:00 am, racers are encouraged to arrive by 8:15 am. The course circles through the beautiful Ednam forest. This year the top five male and female racers will be recognized and the top male and female overall will be awarded a fully cooked turkey prepared by the Old Mill Room at the Boar’s Head Inn.Richmond 10K Turkey TrotLooping around the campus of the University of Richmond, the Richmond Turkey Trot 10K will run from 9-11am on November 27th (Thanksgiving Day). The race is a city favorite and sells out at its 1600 participant limit. The course can be challenging, running mostly on hilly streets with about a ½ mile on trail by the campus’ lake. There is a free kids run before the main race at 8:30. All participating runners receive their own Turkey Trot t-shirt while first, second, and third place earn $75, $50, and $35 gift certificates. Additionally, the top male and female earn $50. The last day of registration is November 26th. If interested register here.ChattanoogaLocal Chattanoogan Health Club, the Sportsbarn, is hosting a four-race Turkey Trot extravaganza at the Sportsbarn’s East location on Lee Highway. The pre-feast races all begin Thanksgiving morning: the One Mile Fun Run (every Turkey Trot has one of these) and 6/10 mile Kiddie-K run start at 8:30am, the three mile walk starts at 8:45 am (canines welcomed) and the 8K starts at 9:00 am. Cheaper pre-registration ends at noon the day before but participants cans still enter the day of the race for a slightly higher price ($15). The proceeds will benefit the Kidney Foundation of Chattanooga and donations are encouraged.Lynchburgturkey-trotThe Turkey Trot worth running Thanksgiving morning in Lynchburg begins downtown at the intersections of 8th and Main Street in front of the Wells Fargo. The races offered are a 5k, Fun Walk course beginning at 9:00 am and the Youth One Mile Course at 8:00 am. Registration will continue until thirty minutes before the race but prices will rise as Thanksgiving nears. All participants will receive a Turkey Trot race shirt and winners are awarded their very own smoked Turkey. The Trot is sponsored by Wells Fargo and proceeds will benefit the programs of Virginia nonprofit, Humankind, which provide and promote residential health care, early childhood development, Mental Health Services, Economic Empowerment, Safe and Healthy Living,RoanokeStarting at the Suntrust Plaza, the Drumstick Dash is a 5K race that begins Thanksgiving morning at 9:00 a.m. and winds through downtown Roanoke. The Dash is sure to put families in the spirit of giving, permitting racers of all ages to participate in one of four categories: runner, walker, baby in stroller, and dog on leash. Rain or shine the Dash will go on, awarding the top three overall male and female as well as the top three male and female in the 40 and over division and 14 and under division. Proceeds provide food, shelter, and clothing to the 350-plus people serviced by Rescue Mission Ministries, Roanoke.AshevilleOn Thanksgiving morning in Asheville, expect a busy Pack Square Park for the cities Jus’ Runnin 5K Turkey Trot & Gobble Wobble 1 Mile Fun Run. This will be the 5k Trots 14th year. The event is sponsored by Earth Fare and a portion of the proceeds will be given to the MANNA Food Bank. The Fun Run begins at 8:30 a.m. while the Trot starts at 9:15 a.m. sharp. Both races begin and end at Pack Square Park.–David Hollerith is a freelance writer, Virginian, and outdoorsman currently residing and writing in Nashville, Tenn.last_img read more

Read More →

El Chapo charged with 12 killings; Mexican cartel leader commits suicide

first_img U.S. donates helicopters to bolster the Honduran Army’s counter-narcotics fight The United States recently donated several CH-47F Chinook and UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters to the Honduran Army, aircraft which will enable the Honduran military to reach narco-trafficking hotbeds in remote areas more quickly. The helicopters will transport troops to areas in the departments of Gracias a Dios, Colón and Olancho in a matter of hours. Without the aircraft, it would typically take as many as eight days to transport troops to such areas, by land and sea. In a new 48-page federal indictment, U.S. authorities charge El Chapo and his top lieutenant, Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada, with ordering 12 killings and dozens of other acts of violence to promote the Sinaloa Cartel’s criminal activities. The two drug kingpins ordered the killings of Mexican law enforcement agents, members of the military, public officials, and rival drug cartel leaders, the indictment alleges. El Chapo has been imprisoned since Mexican Marines captured him in his seaside apartment in Mazatlán on February 22. The helicopters will help Honduran troops in multiple ways. The two drug kingpins also allegedly ordered the 2008 killing of Rafael Ramírez Jaime, who was an official in the State of Mexico’s Attorney General’s office. A gunman or gunmen shot him to death in his home near Mexico City. In addition to ordering the killings of law enforcement officials, El Chapo and El Mayo also directed the assassinations of drug cartel rivals. For example, the two drug kingpins allegedly ordered the 2004 killing of Rodolfo Carrillo Fuentes, who was a leader of the Juárez Cartel. He was known as “The Golden Child.” Gunmen shot The Golden Child to death in in the parking lot of a movie theater in the Sinaloa state capital in of Culiacán in 2004. The indictment accuses El Chapo and El Mayo with ordering the 2008 killing of Roberto Velasco Bravo, who was the head of the Mexico’s Organized Crime Investigation Unit. A gunman or gunmen shot him to death in the Tepito neighborhood of Mexico City. “This support is vital for us. It saves us time, minimizes risks and gives us an enhanced operational capacity. We’ve always had a good relationship with the U.S. Armed Forces. They’ve always helped us with training and cooperation and that strengthens our country.” The helicopters will help Honduran troops in multiple ways. The two drug kingpins also allegedly ordered the 2008 killing of Rafael Ramírez Jaime, who was an official in the State of Mexico’s Attorney General’s office. A gunman or gunmen shot him to death in his home near Mexico City. In addition to ordering the killings of law enforcement officials, El Chapo and El Mayo also directed the assassinations of drug cartel rivals. For example, the two drug kingpins allegedly ordered the 2004 killing of Rodolfo Carrillo Fuentes, who was a leader of the Juárez Cartel. He was known as “The Golden Child.” Gunmen shot The Golden Child to death in in the parking lot of a movie theater in the Sinaloa state capital in of Culiacán in 2004. “When he saw that there was no escape, he shot himself,” said Gonzalo Ponce, a spokesman for the Mexican government. Even as El Chapo faces charges while under arrest, Benjamín Mondragón Pereda, the leader of the Guerrero Unidos Cartel, committed suicide October 14 to avoid being arrested in the city of Juitepec in the state of Morelos. Even as El Chapo faces charges while under arrest, Benjamín Mondragón Pereda, the leader of the Guerrero Unidos Cartel, committed suicide October 14 to avoid being arrested in the city of Juitepec in the state of Morelos. Mexican drug cartel leader kills himself to avoid arrest “The fact that (the U.S. military) provides us with logistics and personnel transportation support allows us to have more training time which results in a better performance in the Gracias a Dios region,” said Honduras Army Lt Col. Norman Bustillo, the Joint Chief of Staff’s operations director. The Guerrero Unidos Cartel is suspected of transporting large amounts of marijuana and heroin to the U.S. city of Chicago in the state of Illinois. In a new 48-page federal indictment, U.S. authorities charge El Chapo and his top lieutenant, Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada, with ordering 12 killings and dozens of other acts of violence to promote the Sinaloa Cartel’s criminal activities. The two drug kingpins ordered the killings of Mexican law enforcement agents, members of the military, public officials, and rival drug cartel leaders, the indictment alleges. Meanwhile, thanks to international cooperation, the Honduran Army’s 4th Battalion’s airborne efforts to fight drug trafficking is getting a boost. “When he saw that there was no escape, he shot himself,” said Gonzalo Ponce, a spokesman for the Mexican government. Before the Mexican Marines captured him in February, Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, the longtime leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, was the world’s most-wanted drug kingpin. U.S. federal authorities have accused him and his cartel of trafficking large amounts of cocaine, heroin, and synthetic drugs into the United States. El Mayo, who remains at large, has replaced El Chapo as the leader of the “largest drug trafficking organization in the world,” according to the indictment. It further alleges that he and El Chapo used their “network of corrupt police and political contacts” to oversee “a large-scale narcotics transportation network involving the use of land, air and sea transportation assets, shipping multi-ton quantities of cocaine from South America, through Central America and Mexico, and finally into the U.S.”. Before the Mexican Marines captured him in February, Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, the longtime leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, was the world’s most-wanted drug kingpin. U.S. federal authorities have accused him and his cartel of trafficking large amounts of cocaine, heroin, and synthetic drugs into the United States. Meanwhile, thanks to international cooperation, the Honduran Army’s 4th Battalion’s airborne efforts to fight drug trafficking is getting a boost. Federal authorities in five U.S. states have previously indicted El Chapo for drug trafficking, homicide, and other crimes. In addition to New York, El Chapo is facing federal charges in the states of California, Texas, Florida, New Hampshire, and Illinois. Mexican military and law enforcement officials suspect El Mayo is in hiding in the mountains in the state of Sinaloa, where the cartel’s operations are based. The indictment accuses El Chapo and El Mayo with ordering the 2008 killing of Roberto Velasco Bravo, who was the head of the Mexico’s Organized Crime Investigation Unit. A gunman or gunmen shot him to death in the Tepito neighborhood of Mexico City. El Mayo, who remains at large, has replaced El Chapo as the leader of the “largest drug trafficking organization in the world,” according to the indictment. It further alleges that he and El Chapo used their “network of corrupt police and political contacts” to oversee “a large-scale narcotics transportation network involving the use of land, air and sea transportation assets, shipping multi-ton quantities of cocaine from South America, through Central America and Mexico, and finally into the U.S.”. The 21-count indictment accuses El Chapo and El Mayo of directing hit men to commit “hundreds of acts of violence, including murders, assaults, kidnappings, assassinations and acts of torture.” Handed down by a federal grand jury in Brooklyn, New York, it was unsealed in late September. “This support is vital for us. It saves us time, minimizes risks and gives us an enhanced operational capacity. We’ve always had a good relationship with the U.S. Armed Forces. They’ve always helped us with training and cooperation and that strengthens our country.” “The fact that (the U.S. military) provides us with logistics and personnel transportation support allows us to have more training time which results in a better performance in the Gracias a Dios region,” said Honduras Army Lt Col. Norman Bustillo, the Joint Chief of Staff’s operations director. Mexican drug cartel leader kills himself to avoid arrest By Dialogo October 16, 2014 El Chapo has been imprisoned since Mexican Marines captured him in his seaside apartment in Mazatlán on February 22. U.S. donates helicopters to bolster the Honduran Army’s counter-narcotics fight The 21-count indictment accuses El Chapo and El Mayo of directing hit men to commit “hundreds of acts of violence, including murders, assaults, kidnappings, assassinations and acts of torture.” Handed down by a federal grand jury in Brooklyn, New York, it was unsealed in late September. The United States recently donated several CH-47F Chinook and UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters to the Honduran Army, aircraft which will enable the Honduran military to reach narco-trafficking hotbeds in remote areas more quickly. The helicopters will transport troops to areas in the departments of Gracias a Dios, Colón and Olancho in a matter of hours. Without the aircraft, it would typically take as many as eight days to transport troops to such areas, by land and sea. Federal authorities in five U.S. states have previously indicted El Chapo for drug trafficking, homicide, and other crimes. In addition to New York, El Chapo is facing federal charges in the states of California, Texas, Florida, New Hampshire, and Illinois. Mexican military and law enforcement officials suspect El Mayo is in hiding in the mountains in the state of Sinaloa, where the cartel’s operations are based. The Guerrero Unidos Cartel is suspected of transporting large amounts of marijuana and heroin to the U.S. city of Chicago in the state of Illinois. The helicopters will also help Honduras provide public safety while it builds schools and health care facilities and maintains important infrastructure, such as roads and bridges. The helicopters will also help Honduras provide public safety while it builds schools and health care facilities and maintains important infrastructure, such as roads and bridges.last_img read more

Read More →

Why leaders resist change

first_imgI recently heard about a leader who lost her job because her employees had lost trust in her. They were demoralized because their customer satisfaction scores were the lowest in the organization. After multiple sessions of talking about strategies to reverse the situation and the development of detailed plans, nothing in the leader’s behavior changed. There was plenty of talk but no action.There are many reasons why leaders don’t change, but in my consulting and coaching work, I’ve found five common reasons:Inertia. Inertia is seductive. It’s easy to get lulled in to doing your work in ways you’ve always done it even if it doesn’t work anymore. There is a tendency to become enamored with the simplicity of replicating the past and remaining content to do uninspired and pedestrian work—work that is not creative but safe and predictable.Ignorance. You can be smart and ignorant simultaneously. For example, a leader can be ignorant about employees’ or customers’ hopes, dreams and aspirations. When leaders lack the knowledge of how to win the hearts and minds of those they work with, they need new information and insight as to how to build personal engagement and commitment. continue reading » 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Read More →

Dearborn county road to close for bridge painting

first_imgDearborn County, In. — Bridge painting on I-74 will close Stout Road in Dearborn County beginning Tuesday, September 19. The project site is located two miles east of U.S. 52, north of West Harrison.Indiana Department of Transportation officials say the detour is Kocher Road, Johnson Fork Road and Old U.S. 52. The work is expected to be complete in about two weeks.last_img

Read More →

Sr. Wilhelmina Burkemper O.S.F.

first_imgSr. Wilhelmina Burkemper, age 93 of the Srs. of St. Francis in Oldenburg, died Saturday, January 6, 2017, Founding Day for the convent.  Born January 25, 1924 in Old Monroe, Missouri, she is the daughter of Rose (Nee: Wehde) and Alexander Burkemper.  Named Virginia Rose, She grew up the sixth of ten children.From their farm, the family could see Immaculate Conception school and the kids walked along the railroad tracks learning to balance themselves, meeting friends along the way as they came and went to school.  On January 1, 1940, she said her goodbyes as she boarded the train to take her to Oldenburg and the Srs. of St. Francis.  She remembers it as being a cold day with snow the whole trip.  She took the name Sr. Wilhelmina after her grandmother who was also her godmother.  The Christian atmosphere she grew up in and the friendly Sisters at Immaculate Conception led her to choose Franciscan life.  Upon her arrival to Oldenburg, her classes began a few days later and she recalls her job was to keep the wooden corridors and main stairway clean.Sr. Wilhelmina taught primary school for 49 years in the inner cities of Ohio, Missouri and Montana. She especially enjoyed teaching and learning from the African American and Native American students.  She also enjoyed gardening and established many beautiful flower gardens.  After retiring from teaching in 1991, she returned to the Motherhouse, serving as the congregation’s archivist until 2015.  In later years she commented, “This journey to the past and meeting all the Sisters has filled me with awe and wonder at the courage, faith, dedication and perseverance that has brought me this far.”She is survived by sister Roseann Coose along with numerous nieces and nephews.  In addition to her parents, she is also preceded in death by siblings Sylvester, Blanche, Catherine, Evelyn,Teresa, Arthur, Victor and Christopher.  Visitation is Wednesday, January 10th, from 1 – 3 p.m. at the convent.  Funeral services follow at 3 p.m. with Rev. Robert Weakley O.F.M. officiating and burial will follow in the convent cemetery.  Memorials may be made to the Srs. of St. Francis, P.O. Box 100, Oldenburg, IN, 47036 (www.OldenburgFranciscans.org).  Weigel Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.last_img read more

Read More →

No relegation for 2019-20 season in Turkish Süper Lig

first_img He added that the Supr Lig’s new foreign player restrictions would also not apply for the 2020-21 season. Read Also: Lampard aims to cap Chelsea comeback with FA Cup glory The current rules say Süper Lig clubs could sign a maximum of 14 foreigners in a season as there are no restrictions for the starting 11. The new rule indicates that clubs can sign 14 foreign players at most, with eight playing on the pitch at any given time. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… The Turkish Football Federation (TFF) has announced that clubs will not be relegated to a lower league for the 2019-20 season in the top-tier Turkish Süper Lig. TFF chairman Nihat Özdemir made the announcement on Wednesday, July 29, adding that 21 teams will play in the Super Lig next season. So, BtcTurk Yeni Malatyaspor, Hes Kablo Kayserispor and MKE Ankaragücü will play in the division next season as these three would normally have been relegated to the second-tier TFF First League once the season ended.center_img Özdemir said four teams would be relegated at the end of the 2020-21 season from Süper Lig, with 20 to compete in the top-tier division’s 2021-22 season. Promoted ContentWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The WorldWhat Happens When You Eat Eggs Every Single Day?7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe8 Ways Drones Will Automate Our FutureBest Car Manufacturers In The World8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouThe Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All TimeCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Waylast_img read more

Read More →