All Good Records Releases The Full “Freshly Baked” Compilation

first_imgPart of the bliss of being GRiZ is spreading the good word of his fellow musical companions. His own All Good Records successfully brings together the talents of a future generation of stars to celebrate the progress of all genres. After some built up anticipation, the newest drop is the ‘Freshly Baked’ Vol. 1 featuring ten up-and-coming producers of varying styles hand picked by GRiZ and served to you fresh (and for free download). After rolling out singles by Marshall McGee, Birocratic, Ganja White Night, and Recess, the full compilation is finally here.If you are a fan of GRiZ, then you will inevitably be a fan of his fellow music-makers. So turn this up. Loud.last_img read more

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Marco Benevento Welcomes Scott Metzger And More In Brooklyn Bowl Performance [Gallery]

first_imgLast night, Marco Benevento brought his solo band to Brooklyn Bowl for a whimsical performance. The show featured support from WOLF!, the solo project of Benevento’s Joe Russo’s Almost Dead bandmate Scott Metzger. The Brooklyn Bowl faithful came out in droves for the performance, showing love to two musicians that are no strangers to the Williamsburg venue.After WOLF!, Benevento took the stage with his skilled and charismatic trio featuring drummer Andy Borger and 22-year old bass phenom Karina Rykman. The band ran through a suite of songs from Benevento’s The Story Of Fred Short, before welcoming Metzger on guitar for a sing-along “At The Show” encore.You can view a gallery of photos from the performance below, courtesy of photographer Andrew O’Brien.Benevento and his band are back in action on February 7th at The Hollow in Albany, NY. You can also catch him with Joe Russo for a rare Benevento/Russo Duo show at Brooklyn Bowl later this month. For a full list of upcoming Marco Benevento solo dates, visit his website. Load remaining images Marco Benevento w/ WOLF! | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 2/2/17last_img read more

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Students study, research abroad in Cambridge

first_imgGraduate students in the Italian program in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures have the opportunity to work with leading academics at the University of Cambridge. Zygmunt Baranski, Emeritus Serena Professor of Italian at the University of Cambridge, joined the Notre Dame College of Arts and Letters faculty in 2011 as its first Notre Dame Professor of Dante and Italian studies. “The Italian sections are relatively small and this partnership with Cambridge ensures that students have contact with a broader range of professors, libraries and resources,” Baranski said. Every year, one Notre Dame student goes to Cambridge and one Cambridge student comes to Notre Dame for a semester. This program is aimed exclusively for PhD students who are already writing a thesis in Italian. They will have an advisor who will help them with their research and they will maintain a link once they have gone back to their host institution, Baranski said. Damiano Benvegnu, a current Ph.D. candidate in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Literature Program at the University of Notre Dame. He was the first Notre Dame graduate student to participate in the exchange. His dissertation research, “Primo Levi and the Question of the Animal,” investigates the animal imagery in the work of the Jewish-Italian writer Primo Levi, focusing on how his literature operates when the human/animal divide is at stake. He will defend his dissertation in May 2013. “In this research I compare what has been considered the hyper-humanistic literary production of Primo Levi with the post-humanistic trend in contemporary philosophy,” Benvegnu said. “This comparison helps us to rethink not simply Levi’s literature and his Holocaust testimony, but also both the ethical and epistemological complexity of the human/animal divide(s) and the crisis of traditional humanism in the second half of the twentieth century.” Benvegnu spent the 2011 Michaelmas Term (September to December) at Cambridge and was part of Trinity Hall College. “I had the opportunity to work at the fantastic University Library there and to have almost weekly meetings with Professor Robert Gordon, head of Department of Italian at the University of Cambridge, and one of most prominent scholars in modern Italian literature,” Benvegu said. “The opportunity to work with him not only was incredibly enjoyable and stimulating, but helped me to better frame my own research and ideas.” Beatrice Priest, a Cambridge student, came to Notre Dame last year. “I learned a great deal from the graduate research seminars, made extensive use of the libraries, including the special Dante collections, and had many stimulating discussions with professors, post-docs, and other graduate students about Dante, the Middle Ages, and beyond,” Priest said. “Additionally, the opportunity to teach American undergraduates Italian language was tremendously rewarding. I would thoroughly recommend the exchange program to anyone thinking of participating in it.” Baranski stressed the importance of international partnerships. “I believe that in academia there is a need to have international ties,” he said. “Since there is a limited number of faculty, we need to teach students the importance of collaboration so that there remains a healthy and proper exchange of ideas.” Contact Charitha Isanaka at [email protected]last_img read more

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Lessons of the Week! Bradley Cooper, Audra McDonald & More

first_img View Comments Ladies and gents, we have an important announcement: In case you haven’t heard, it’s Friday! That means it’s time to do this, this and this. And of course, it’s time for the Lessons of the Week. As usual, a ton of crazy stuff happened in the last seven days—check out what we learned below.Bradley Cooper Has a Big TrunkWe thought Cooper was starring in The Elephant Man, but apparently we were wrong. Lesli Margherita tweeted, “Lady asked me if I knew where ‘Bradley Cooper Elephant Show’ theater is. Gave directions & said I hope she gets 2 c his trunk.” Full trunk-al nudity?! This show has everything!Idina Menzel Likes Classy Daytime DatesNews flash, Fanzels—the If/Then star is ready to start dating! There’s only one problem: Her schedule doesn’t allow for dinner dates, and she doesn’t want to do any “slutty” dates after midnight. So she’s basically Cinderella with better shoes.Neverland Has Found Matthew MorrisonGlee’s Matthew Morrison is quitting school and flying into Finding Neverland alongside Kelsey Grammer and Laura Michelle Kelly. Yes, we know Jeremy Jordan would also have been great. But don’t worry, Neverland producer Harvey Weinstein is also behind The Last Five Years movie and Jordan’s definitely in that. See, you’re smiling!Hugh Jackman Is a Bloody Good ActorStarring on Broadway is a dangerous job. Hugh Jackman guts a real fish onstage in The River, and he’s accidentally cut himself not once, but twice—he even had to get five stitches! Bloody good show, Hugh, but we like you with all 10 fingers, OK?Alysha Umphress’ Annie Had BoobsTo play Annie, you need dimples, red hair and a killer belt voice. On the Town’s Alysha Umphress possesses these things in spades, but she also had something else when she played the adorable orphan: Boobs! Well, you know what they say…you’re never fully dressed without a training bra.NBC Can’t Handle the TruthIf there’s one thing we love, it’s yelling at the TV. If there’s another thing we love, it’s tweeting while yelling at the TV. So naturally, we’re psyched NBC might be doing a live broadcast of A Few Good Men. You want the telecast? You want the telecast? YOU CAN’T HANDLE THE TELECAST!Wanna Be Like Nancy Opel? Schmooze.Honeymoon in Vegas star Nancy Opel has been around the Broadway block 13 times, so when she doles out advice, we listen. Her tips: Make as many connections as possible and compliment Stephen Sondheim whenever you can. Hey Steve, you’re awesome! Now can we be on Broadway?Duck Dynasty: The Musical Is a ThingWe’re running out of books and movies to turn into musicals, so it’s time to make reality TV shows sing and dance! After The X Factor tuner, the Robertson family is coming to the Vegas stage. What’s next, Shark Tank? Hoarders? My Strange Addiction? All of the above, please.Tracey Ullman’s In Love with a CowThe Band Wagon star Tracey Ullman has fallen head over heels for her bovine co-star in the Into the Woods movie, a real cow named Tug. She was so sweet, Ullman is forgoing burgers in her honor. Tracey, there are a lot more animals where that came from if you come back to Broadway.Audra McDonald Knows How to Boil EggsYahoo! Answers guru Audra McDonald sings the answers to all sorts of queries, but unless they’re about Broadway or her Westchester compound Eggfartopia, we’re never sure if we can trust her. Well, this week, we’re in luck! An egg question! Thanks, Audra, that’s eggggggsactly what we wanted to know. Eggggggcellent.last_img read more

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Mulch volcano

first_imgBy Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaIn many manicured landscapes, plants often seem to grow out of little mulch volcanoes. But piling mulch 1 to 3 feet deep around trees is way too much of a good thing, experts say.”Piling mulch around the base of the plant does more harm than good,” said Gary Wade, a Cooperative Extension horticulturist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”It generally sets the plant up for long-term stress,” he said, “which makes it more prone to injury from insects, diseases and environmental extremes.”Proper mulchingGenerally, mulching plants is good, Wade said. Mulches: Keep the roots evenly moist.Insulate roots from extreme heat and cold.Prevent weeds that compete with plants for moisture and nutrients.Serve as a barrier to certain soil-borne diseases. “Done properly,” he said, “mulching is one of the best things you can do to help plants get established and survive our environmental extremes.”But there’s a right way to do it, he said. And making mulch volcanoes isn’t it.Mulch volcanoesMulch volcanoes can be particularly deadly to newly planted trees and shrubs, Wade said. It causes problems in two ways.First, it encourages roots to grow the wrong way. At first, the conditions in the top of the volcano are moist and attractive to roots while the waterlogged soil under the volcano suffocates deep roots. The roots grow up, rather than down.In the long run, though, mulch can’t hold nearly as much water as the soil. So when the mulch volcano dries out, the plants can be severely stressed.Second, the volcano can become an umbrella, shedding water to the surrounding area. Fungal activity can make the umbrella-shaped surface become resistant to wetting. Water runs off the mulch, rather than moving into it. This is more common, Wade said, in high-carbon mulches like ground wood, wood chips or sawdust.You need to remember, he said, that newly planted trees and shrubs are still like container plants, making their living from the original root ball. If the volcano-umbrella keeps the root ball dry, the plant will struggle and may not survive.More problemsAnd that’s not all, Wade said. Mulch volcanoes can cause problems for even established trees. They can: The key to proper mulching, Wade said, is to take a good look at how nature mulches plants. The natural mulch of fallen leaves is flat and rarely more than 2 inches thick. It never looks like a volcano.A 6-inch layer of bark will last a long time, he said. But it may restrict gas exchange in the soil and may keep the soil too wet during rainy periods.A mulch layer 3 inches deep after settling is enough for most plants. If you can, extend the mulched areas out to the outermost leaves (called the drip line) and beyond. And pull the mulch back a few inches from the main trunk.Mulching properly will help keep your plants healthy, Wade said. Mulch volcanoes can have the opposite effect.(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) Keep plants from getting enough oxygen, resulting in root death and decay.Make the lower trunk more constantly moist, promoting fungal canker diseases.Cause stress from poor gas exchange by the cells in the bark, resulting in bark death and decay.Invite damage from termites and rodents that may live in the volcano.last_img read more

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Peru’s Armed Forces and National Police Disable Clandestine Narco-strips

first_imgWith improved technology, Peruvian security forces will be better equipped to detect narco-planes. Minister of Defense Pedro Cateriano announced in May that the country was purchasing six sophisticated radar devices to locate unauthorized planes entering Peruvian airspace. Nonetheless, narco-flights can be lucrative for drug trafficking groups. For instance, one load of drugs, weighing between 200 and 500 kilograms, can be worth as much as 300,000 dollars to a drug trafficking group. And building clandestine landing strips for narco-flights is not costly for drug trafficking groups generating large amounts of cash. In November, they destroyed or disabled 15 clandestine landing strips that drug trafficking operatives used to transport cocaine, cocaine precursor chemicals, and cocaine paste. Those substances are typically imported from Brazil, Bolivia, and Colombia. By interrupting the ability of narco-traffickers to transport drugs on planes, Peruvian military and law enforcement authorities are forcing them to use ground routes. Of the 49,800 hectares which farmers in Peru use to cultivate coca leaf, more than 19,100 hectares are in the VRAEM, according to the National Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (DEVIDA). Most of the annual crop is used to process illegal cocaine. Combatting narco-planes in the air Ten of the strips that the Armed Forces and National Police dismantled were located in the district of Canaire, province of Huanta, in the Ayacucho region; the other five were located in Pichari, province of Convención, in the Cusco region, according to the Armed Forces Joint Command. Overall, there are about 150 clandestine landing strips in the 13 coca-producing basins in Peru, according to an estimate by the Drug Enforcement Directorate of the National Police. They’re typically between 600 and 800 meters long, depending on the type of plane that uses them. Some clandestine air strips are located in the coca-producing basin of the Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM), since that is where much of the country’s coca crop is cultivated. “It is not very expensive to build a clandestine landing strip because they do not need to meet the legal requirements for proper landing strips,” Hurtado said. “They are sometimes used just for a few flights or special cargo and subsequently abandoned.” “We [sometimes] have to come back not long after we disable a clandestine strip, because a drug trafficker can pay a coca farmer less than 20 dollars to rebuild the landing strip, filling the holes in, and in some cases they even use heavy machinery found in the area,” said security analyst Darío Hurtado Cárdenas, who led the Drug Enforcement Directorate and the National Defense and Border Protection Directorate from October 2011 to January 2013. Transporting drugs by plane is expensive. For example, it costs $60,000 to rent a plane in Bolivia – usually a single-engine Cessna 206s or 210s, according to Hurtado. Drug trafficking organizations typically pay pilots $20,000 for every narco-flight. Security forces use explosives to disable or destroy landing strips “The Armed Forces, through the Air Force, will acquire radar — which our country currently does not have — that will allow us to confront these drug planes successfully,” Cateriano said on May 22, during a visit to the Incahuasi military base, located in Cusco. From November 2013 through to November 2014, Peruvian aircraft intercepted 14 Bolivian planes that entered Peru to transport drugs from the coca-producing areas, Leonel Cabrera Pino, the chief of the Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Command (CCFFAA) reported. Some clandestine air strips are located in the coca-producing basin of the Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM), since that is where much of the country’s coca crop is cultivated. Security forces use explosives to disable or destroy landing strips Disabling and dismantling clandestine air strips have proved an effective approach to combatting aerial narco-trafficking, but it’s not the only method. Peruvian law prohibits the Air Force from shooting down civilian aircraft, but it can confront suspected narco-planes in Peruvian airspace and force them to land. “[That’s where] we’ll get them,” said GeneralVicente Romero, chief of Peru’s National Police Drug Enforcement Directorate. “We [sometimes] have to come back not long after we disable a clandestine strip, because a drug trafficker can pay a coca farmer less than 20 dollars to rebuild the landing strip, filling the holes in, and in some cases they even use heavy machinery found in the area,” said security analyst Darío Hurtado Cárdenas, who led the Drug Enforcement Directorate and the National Defense and Border Protection Directorate from October 2011 to January 2013. The economics of narco-flights Combatting narco-planes in the air By Dialogo December 15, 2014center_img In November, they destroyed or disabled 15 clandestine landing strips that drug trafficking operatives used to transport cocaine, cocaine precursor chemicals, and cocaine paste. Those substances are typically imported from Brazil, Bolivia, and Colombia. By interrupting the ability of narco-traffickers to transport drugs on planes, Peruvian military and law enforcement authorities are forcing them to use ground routes. “[That’s where] we’ll get them,” said GeneralVicente Romero, chief of Peru’s National Police Drug Enforcement Directorate. Of the 49,800 hectares which farmers in Peru use to cultivate coca leaf, more than 19,100 hectares are in the VRAEM, according to the National Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (DEVIDA). Most of the annual crop is used to process illegal cocaine. I would also like the ARGENTINE Republic to intervene. that’s terrible To destroy or disable the strips used by drug traffickers, security forces usually dig two holes — one on each side of the strip — and fill them with explosives. Detonating those explosives usually create depressions about two meters deep and five meters wide. Ten of the strips that the Armed Forces and National Police dismantled were located in the district of Canaire, province of Huanta, in the Ayacucho region; the other five were located in Pichari, province of Convención, in the Cusco region, according to the Armed Forces Joint Command. Overall, there are about 150 clandestine landing strips in the 13 coca-producing basins in Peru, according to an estimate by the Drug Enforcement Directorate of the National Police. They’re typically between 600 and 800 meters long, depending on the type of plane that uses them. “It is not very expensive to build a clandestine landing strip because they do not need to meet the legal requirements for proper landing strips,” Hurtado said. “They are sometimes used just for a few flights or special cargo and subsequently abandoned.” From November 2013 through to November 2014, Peruvian aircraft intercepted 14 Bolivian planes that entered Peru to transport drugs from the coca-producing areas, Leonel Cabrera Pino, the chief of the Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Command (CCFFAA) reported. Nonetheless, narco-flights can be lucrative for drug trafficking groups. For instance, one load of drugs, weighing between 200 and 500 kilograms, can be worth as much as 300,000 dollars to a drug trafficking group. And building clandestine landing strips for narco-flights is not costly for drug trafficking groups generating large amounts of cash. Transporting drugs by plane is expensive. For example, it costs $60,000 to rent a plane in Bolivia – usually a single-engine Cessna 206s or 210s, according to Hurtado. Drug trafficking organizations typically pay pilots $20,000 for every narco-flight. Peruvian law enforcement authorities are building control towers at legitimate airfields in coca-producing regions where the military and police have found clandestine air strips. Once the towers are complete, air traffic controllers who detect unauthorized planes will be able to notify the Air Force, which can respond quickly to intercept suspicious aircraft. With improved technology, Peruvian security forces will be better equipped to detect narco-planes. Minister of Defense Pedro Cateriano announced in May that the country was purchasing six sophisticated radar devices to locate unauthorized planes entering Peruvian airspace. Peru’s Armed Forces and the country’s National Police are ramping up their efforts to dismantle clandestine landing strips used by drug traffickers. Disabling and dismantling clandestine air strips have proved an effective approach to combatting aerial narco-trafficking, but it’s not the only method. Peruvian law prohibits the Air Force from shooting down civilian aircraft, but it can confront suspected narco-planes in Peruvian airspace and force them to land. The economics of narco-flights “The Armed Forces, through the Air Force, will acquire radar — which our country currently does not have — that will allow us to confront these drug planes successfully,” Cateriano said on May 22, during a visit to the Incahuasi military base, located in Cusco. Peru’s Armed Forces and the country’s National Police are ramping up their efforts to dismantle clandestine landing strips used by drug traffickers. Peruvian law enforcement authorities are building control towers at legitimate airfields in coca-producing regions where the military and police have found clandestine air strips. Once the towers are complete, air traffic controllers who detect unauthorized planes will be able to notify the Air Force, which can respond quickly to intercept suspicious aircraft. To destroy or disable the strips used by drug traffickers, security forces usually dig two holes — one on each side of the strip — and fill them with explosives. Detonating those explosives usually create depressions about two meters deep and five meters wide. last_img read more

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Bolivia’s FELCN has Seized 14.4 Tons of Cocaine in 2015

first_img Continued vigilance Arrested: 1 Bolivian and 2 Ecuadorean nationals Arrested: 1 Bolivian national By Dialogo August 20, 2015 Between January and the end of July, Bolivia’s Special Force against Drug Trafficking (FELCN) seized 14.4 tons of cocaine and destroyed more than 1,800 small-scale drug factories while conducting an average of 31 operations daily. Where: Estrada La Guardia km 9, department of Santa Cruz Bolivia has intensified its air, ground, and river operations through fixed and mobile check points, particularly in airports and border zones by working with Peru’s Drug Enforcement Directorate (DIRANDRO). By comparison, FELCN seized 13.3 tons of cocaine, eradicated 3,033 small-scale drug factories, and captured 1,757 suspects during the first six months of 2014. Seized: 212 kilograms of cocaine Bolivia also has made advances in reducing the area cultivated for illegal crops. From 2012-2013, the area used to cultivate coca leaves decreased 9 percent from 25,300 hectares to 23,000 hectares – the smallest area of hectares cultivated since 2002, according to the World Drug Report 2015, published by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in June of this year. Operation El Montero When: January 5, 2015 Arrested: 5 Bolivian, 2 Peruvian, and 1 Brazilian national Drug trafficking in Bolivia doesn’t involve large, organized groups, according to FELCN. “Slowly but surely, there has been a gradual displacement of crops in the VREAM and Alto Huallaga towards the Peruvian department of Loreto, on the border with Ecuador, which is quite far from the current cocaine production zone in Peru,” security analyst Norberto Emmerich said. “Presumably, this displacement will have a positive effect on decreasing the Peru-Bolivia shipping route.” The confiscation of airplanes is intended to shut down the air corridor for the trafficking of controlled substances from Peru to Bolivia, according to Vice Minister Cáceres. When: January 28, 2015 The principle operations conducted by FELCN in the last few months include: Operation Cazador Where: Villa Rosario, province of Santa Cruz Operation Cañaveral “There are no drug trafficking organizations [in Bolivia],” FELCN Social Communications Service told Diálogo. “In most cases, it is clans or individuals working in this illegal activity.” Where: Montero, department of Santa Cruz Delgadillo, who attended the anniversary ceremony along with several government authorities, said 1,752 drug factories, 42 crystal methamphetamine labs, and 37 cocaine recycling labs were destroyed in the year’s first seven months. Agents also confiscated an estimated $16.7 million in items, including vehicles, cash, and property, in addition to 24 suspected narco-planes. The pressure against narco-planes and the eradication of crops have caused shifts in the regional drug map. Assets confiscated: 6 pick-up trucks, 1 truck, 1 moped, 2 planes, 8 cell phones, 6 firearms Seized: 5,880 kilograms of cocaine Drug-trafficking clans FELCN has reported that approximately only about 10 percent of suspects detained in connection to drug trafficking are foreigners, with Colombians, Peruvians, and Brazilians topping the list of those prosecuted under Law 1008 on Coca and Controlled Substances, according to the Bolivian Information Agency (ABI). “All of these operations resulted in the arrest of 1,975 suspects, 1,850 of whom were Bolivian nationals while 125 were foreigners,” FELCN Director Santiago Delgadillo said during celebrations for FELCN’s 28th anniversary on July 27 at the National Police Academy (ANAPOL) in La Paz. Seized: 124 kilograms of cocaine When: March 4, 2015 “Bolivia continues to be used for transit,” he said during a media conference on May 11, pointing out the cocaine comes from Peru’s Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. Security authorities anticipate more actions like these in the next few months. Seized: 5.4 kilograms of cocaine Principle operations When: June 2-4, 2015 Where: San Joaquín, department of Beni Assets confiscated: 1 car Operation Rey Babel Assets confiscated: Two FAL rifles, a shotgun, and a pick-up truck Shutting down the air corridor “The Special Force in the War on Drugs will continue to work to protect and benefit society, in order to serve our country with dignity and sovereignty,” FELCN said in a statement.last_img read more

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Peru, US Exchange Knowledge on Information Operations

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo October 19, 2018 Peruvian officers took part in a U.S. Southern Command- (SOUTHCOM) coordinated Information Operations (IO) knowledge exchange, with support from the Eighth Information Operations Division of the Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Chiefs of Staff (8VA DIEMCFFAA, in Spanish). The Bilateral IO Seminar was held September 10th-14th at the Peruvian Army Computerized Tactical Training Center in Lima, Peru. The seminar’s objective was to strengthen and promote hands-on military capabilities in IO by way of exchanging experiences and lessons learned. The seminar will enable the Peruvian Armed Forces to use best practices and develop methodologies to support strategic efforts to counter threats in the region. “These workshops are a means to exchange information and then adapt it to different realities,” Peruvian Army Colonel Jorge Reyes Gutiérrez, commandant of the Army School of Psychological Operations, told Diálogo. “We saw exercises fail when they attempted to apply [the information] directly, because the social, economic, and cultural realities are different—coastal, highland, and jungle communities are not the same.” A total of 50 service members, including students of the Army Psychological Operations School and members of each branch of the Peruvian Armed Forces, took part in the seminar. About five elements of the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM, in Spanish) Special Command also participated. “One of the goals was to learn about the experience that the U.S. gained in Information Operations, since they work worldwide,” Peruvian Army Colonel Emilio Rodríguez Freundt, 8VA DIEMCFFAA commander, told Diálogo. “They have the experience and developed it. That’s what we wanted to do.” Modern vision The seminar kicked off with three days of presentations on doctrinal IO concepts and specific cases. The event concluded with two days of practical group exercises to present products. Strategic planners from SOUTHCOM conducted talks about IO concepts, how their division is organized, and its interaction with related capabilities. U.S. delegates also addressed IO planning at a strategic level. “The course was important because we brought members of SOUTHCOM with a lot of experience in the region,” said U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel Eduardo Lauer, special forces liaison officer at the U.S. Embassy in Peru. “We wanted to go beyond the tactical level to focus on the operational aspect.” As part of the presentations, a lieutenant colonel from the Brazilian Army who attends the Peruvian Army School of Psychological Operations, explained and analyzed the Brazilian Army’s operations in the slums of Rio de Janeiro. Another focused on the situation in VRAEM, which remains a hub for organized crime, armed groups, and narcotraffickers in Peru. “The problem we have in Peru is not operational but tactical,” Col. Reyes said. “When [service members] deploy to VRAEM, they provide tactical, non-operational solutions. It’s true that the easiest move is the use of force, but the problem isn’t just military, and the solution isn’t 100 percent military either. That typical, anachronistic vision that everything can be solved in a military way, as Machiavelli would say, is no longer the modern outlook.” Non-war Participants concluded the seminar working on practical group exercises to present strategic IO plans based on a terrorism scenario that destabilized a region with drug, arms, and human trafficking. Spread into several work tables, military teams shared ideas—with the support of experts sharing lessons from previously detailed real operations—to address problems and search for non-war solutions. The seminar “was very beneficial,” Col. Rodríguez said, highlighting that the Joint Chiefs of Staff only has five years of experience in IO. SOUTHCOM and 8VA DIEMCFFAA coordinated the event for the second time—the first seminar took place in 2016. “The level that students will reach in time will bear fruit,” Col. Rodríguez said. “The seminar was so beneficial, that we agreed to carry it out again next year so that this can continue over time. If possible, we want to do two seminars next year. We definitely look forward to continuing.”last_img read more

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US Embassy Barbados Provides PPE Funding For COVID-19 Response in the Eastern Caribbean

first_imgBy Steven McLoud/Diálogo June 03, 2020 With the high demand in the Eastern Caribbean for personal protective equipment (PPE) and other medical supplies due to COVID-19, the United States stepped up to assist their partner nations during this crisis.More than $100,000 worth of PPE and other medical supplies were donated to seven Eastern Caribbean countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.Through the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency’s (CDEMA) Regional Response Mechanism, these PPEs could be distributed to the countries. The supplies included 1,000 surgical masks, 500 face shields, 250 protective goggles, 1,200 latex gloves, 1,000 shoe covers, 10 gallons of hand sanitizers, and 87 hazmat suits.The supplies were packaged for each country and issued to their respective national disaster offices for distribution targeting those who are on the front line and are highly exposed, including essential services personnel and security forces.“This donation is one of several programs and initiatives the U.S. has provided to support our neighbors in the Eastern Caribbean”, said U.S. Coast Guard Commander Steve Charnon, senior Defense official at the U.S. Embassy in Barbados, which also oversees the U.S. Security Cooperation Offices (SCO) in the Eastern Caribbean. “Coordinating these donations to help combat COVID-19 was a true team effort and reflects the enduring partnership between the U.S. and the Eastern Caribbean, as well as regional organizations such as CDEMA and the Regional Security System.”These packages were made possible by the SCO and are part of the larger U.S. Southern Command’s Humanitarian Assistance Program, which conducts activities in conjunction with partner nations to alleviate human suffering, disease, hunger and privation, particularly in regions where those needs may pose major challenges to the civilian population.“The unprecedented nature of this pandemic requires collaborative efforts between our region and its partners to respond effectively to the needs of our participating states”, said Elizabeth Riley, CDEMA executive director. “I would like to express our thanks to the SCO and U.S. Embassy Barbados for its support to the region’s ongoing management of the COVID-19 impact,” she added.last_img read more

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What we can learn from a hacker’s conference

first_imgPaul Love, CO-OP’s Chief Information Security Officer, and Veronica Desrosiers, VP of Enterprise Risk Management, attended DEF CON, the hacker’s conference, in Las Vegas last month. If you aren’t familiar with DEF CON, imagine roughly 20,000 hackers, media folks, government and law enforcement agents, security experts and hacking industry vendors under a single roof – all to witness the state of the art in the inglorious world of hacking.Every year, DEF CON seems to generate news. This year, hackers worked their magic on voting machines. In less than an hour and half, they managed to hack the voting system DEF CON set up – and they found more than one way in. Also in the news: Marcus Hutchins, the hacker who singlehandedly disabled the Wannacry ransomware bug was himself arrested by the FBI.How did two serious security experts navigate in this environment? Here’s what they had to say:What was your first impression?Veronica: Going in, my expectation was that this would be just another typical security conference, where I’d learn more about what security attackers and defenders are doing in the security space, so we can continue to mature our controls to meet evolving threats. I’ve been to many conferences, and expected the usual “professional and organized” type setting. Within the first few minutes there, I knew I was in for an adventure. continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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