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first_img View all photos FULL SERIES COVERAGE WATCH: Chase Chat: Kyle Busch MORE: READ: Paint Scheme Preview for Kansas View all articlesView all videos WATCH: Kansas Preview Show RELATED: Full Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup coverageWATCH: Sprint Cup press conferences 11:30 a.m. ET READ: Tires change along with technologylast_img

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Usher Joined The Roots For An Incredible Surprise Show At The Brooklyn Bowl Last Night [Watch]

first_imgEvery Thursday, Questlove DJs an epic late-night dance party at the Brooklyn Bowl. Entitled “Bowl Train,” The Roots drummer always keeps the night fresh with tunes and never the same. Sometimes, he even welcomes some very special surprise guests. Last night was no exception. The thrills began around 4PM EST when @questlove made a post on Instagram about “a miracle” he was planning to deliver. The mysterious posts, containing several letters that phonetically spelled out the name of the top-secret special guest, continued every hour, on the hour, until the rumor mill ran true. “All I can say is something rare bout to happen in a bit. Not like I have 2 spell it out 4 u,” he wrote along with the last clue “E U W” clue, revealing “U” as the highly anticipated final letter.Finally, he spilled:Usher. Questlove brought Usher to join The legendary Roots at the Brooklyn Bowl for his Thursday residency. Beginning just after midnight, the room was packed to the brim with fans. The inner-90’s-child of nearly every concert-goer was beaming with joy and lyrics as the pop star belted out some of his greatest classics. You can relive some of last night’s surprise events in the videos below, courtesy of Marc Millman:The Roots feat. Usher “OMG”The Roots feat. Usher “Yeah” EncoreThe Roots feat. Usher, “Adore” (Prince Cover)The Roots feat. Usher “U Don’t Have To Call”It was a heroic feat, luring in some of the most dedicated fans in town. As an unofficial pre-party to The Roots’ headlining slot at The Roots Family Picnic in Philly over the weekend, Questlove made a night in history for the Brooklyn Bowl, and those in attendance will never forget it.last_img read more

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Kevin Young and a unified theory of Black culture — and himself

first_imgGAZETTE: Now, as the author of numerous books of poems, the editor of several others, and the poetry editor of The New Yorker, what do you consider good poetry?YOUNG: Good poetry all has a similar quality, which is it moves us; it sings to us; it says something perhaps surprising, or unexpected. Or maybe it says something we hadn’t realized we thought or knew or felt. It gives voice. But it also seeks silence. Those kind of qualities are in all good poetry to different degrees. The best poetry, I think, is really layered. I happen to like a poetry that often sucks you in. Someone like Langston Hughes or Lucille Clifton can seem on the surface fairly simple. And then you start to look at it and you realize that layered effect. It’s almost like a painting that draws you in and the closer you get, the more you can see. That mix of surface and depth is really important. And readers respond to that. Sometimes they’re responding to the depth that peeks through and that reaches them even through what might seem kind of hard to parse at first.One of the pleasures of poetry is it’s like a good song. You can sit and listen to it a lot of times and hear something different. The poetry I’m drawn to, or that I’ve taught, is like that. There’s a poem in my recent anthology, “African American Poetry: 250 Years of Struggle & Song,” by Yusef Komunyakaa that I was recently reading and talking about with a group of students, his “Ode to the Maggot.” And I was just blown away by how much more I saw in it, and I’ve read it 1,000 times. That is what the test of poetry is. I try to get readers to think about the ways that the poem deepens.I also think you should meet a poem much like you should meet a person, a little bit open. Sometimes we forget that, and a poem is a good reminder — you have to meet it where it lives. But a poem also lives in lots of different places, and those poems we love, and memorize, and keep, they live on in the body. That kind of physical embodiment is really profound and unique among most art forms, and that’s one of the things I treasure about poetry.GAZETTE: Given all the demands on your time, are you able to continue to write?YOUNG: It’s often hard to find time always, but I’m obviously rejuvenated in some key way by this kind of very meaningful work in archives and libraries, museums and magazines. And it’s work that moves people. I’m always touched when people say something to me about a poem they read in The New Yorker that I picked, or something I published; or they saw and read the Schomburg Black Liberation Reading List and were moved and discovered this whole other side of themselves; or visited the NMAAHC and had a moment to think about their own creativity and their own place in history. I think that’s so moving to me, and also part of why I write, and will keep writing.Interview was gently edited for clarity and length. GAZETTE: Do you think poetry as a form is uniquely suited to respond to this moment?YOUNG: Just since the quarantine, I’ve seen so many poems wrestling with this moment of the pandemic, and its terrors, its boredoms, its effect on love and light. But then also the other pandemic of racism — you see poets really wrestling with an injustice. And so I think poetry is in a different state and calls in many ways for a different poetry. What’s fascinating to me is more than other art forms, poetry can respond in the moment. Poetry is often about moments, these flashes of lyrical beauty, but also pain. I think American poetry has a particular fluidity, or ability with that right now. And so I’ve been really impressed and blown away by poems that I accepted at The New Yorker a while ago that suddenly seem really relevant for the moment, and poems that are new and fresh and about the moment that I think will last the test of time.That’s another test of a poem, that it speaks in different ways at different times. A case in point: Marilyn Nelson’s poem “Pigeon and Hawk.” It’s a tense narrative of recollection, filled with questions about a younger self trusting someone years ago, getting a ride home with them, and then realizing only later this might have been very dangerous. At the end she writes, “a cop might take his knee off a black man’s throat.” I took that poem a year ago, and the sad truth was it was incredibly relevant over the summer, right now, and I fear into the future. And so I think some of those things are important to have said. Her poem’s acknowledgement of the realities of racist violence — which some might have said in the abstract, that would make it dated — is sadly evergreen. So, it’s really important for poems to testify.GAZETTE: Where do you think your own love of words came from?YOUNG: I liked all the subjects, math and science too! My parents were science people and believed strongly in education and being well-rounded. But I definitely loved writing. I used to write little stories when I was a kid, and I think it was a bit of a surprise to my parents, but they were also encouraging. My family’s from Louisiana, in the deep country; one side were preachers and one side were musicians, and somewhere in between comes poetry.,GAZETTE: Do you remember what those early stories were or whether there was an early book that made you want to write?YOUNG: I grew up in part in Kansas, and that’s when I started really writing in earnest. I was fairly young, 12 or 13. Soon I would just get whatever was in the local chain bookstores, which weren’t the best (and don’t even exist anymore), but it made me read really eclectically. The book I first fell in love with right when I was going to College was Rita Dove’s “Thomas and Beulah.” She won a Pulitzer for it, and I remember reading about that in Essence magazine, which my mom got, and saying to myself, “What? This Black woman was the second Black person to win a Pulitzer in poetry?” It had been four decades since Gwendolyn Brooks had won. I ordered the book, and I remember reading it. Around the same time I went down to Louisiana right before I started freshman year. It was there I realized that poetry wasn’t like some abstract thing but that it could be about my grandparents; it could be about the dirt, and the mud, and the car that sat in the yard that we used to play on till we learned it was full of snakes, and that there was a kind of poetry all around me. And so the way that my family told stories and talked and laughed and loved music and dance, all that was part of the poetry I started writing when I got to school.GAZETTE: Had you written any poetry before coming to Harvard?YOUNG: I wrote a lot a lot of bad poetry before coming to Harvard.GAZETTE: What made it bad?YOUNG: The things that were interesting in it, I suppose, were things that I later became better at. I was trying to talk about loss and love, but it was sort of abstract or mythic in a broad way. And I hadn’t realized yet the mythic that lived in the everyday, which is what I really learned in writing about Louisiana. Those poems made up my creative thesis at Harvard, which a year or two later became my first book, “Most Way Home.”My other poetic realization that I came to at Harvard became the last section of my first book: writing poems with a protagonist who was just assumed to be Black. It wasn’t like the speaker spoke about being Black necessarily; it was more like that was part of their fiber. That was important for me, because I hadn’t yet seen either sets of my grandparents in poems, so it made me want to make myth of family and red mud. While I certainly had seen Black speakers, it took me a while to learn the ways that Langston Hughes — who had lived in Kansas like I had — had these great speakers who were bellboys, or cooks, or washerwomen, and they were singing or speaking of their own experience and lives, and that was just assumed. That was really important to me, to be able to try to write in a contemporary vein of driving the landscape or experiencing America from that inherent but often unspoken Black point of view.Now I look back on some of those poems, and I appreciate what I was trying to do: to write untranslated poetry. I would just refer to “the kitchen,” which if you’re Black you know means the back of your head. And so there were things like that, that I really didn’t want to decode. I wanted it to be part of the pleasure of the poem. And I think people like Seamus Heaney, who was my teacher at Harvard and who was writing of his home in Ireland and “the weather of words,” and the poetry I was reading by Lucille Clifton, whom I later got to know, both did that, assuming that their speakers and readers needn’t necessarily explain their origins. And that was a great, liberating thing for me.GAZETTE: What initially drew you to Harvard?YOUNG: I was in Kansas, and I really wanted to be in a place where I could study whatever I chose to study and where I would be pretty much guaranteed that there would be excellent professors and excellent resources. I didn’t fully know how great the resources were, I think, until I got there. But I also knew that I was hungry for the kind of shared experience that Harvard ended up offering me. I got there and founded literary magazines and met my friends, who became writers and filmmakers — people like Colson Whitehead, my good friend from College, who was a year ahead of me. We worked together reviving Diaspora, the Black cultural student magazine. Things like that were really important to me before I sort of made my way in the poetry world. It was a good fit — I liked that Harvard had opportunities, but they didn’t always present themselves. You had to kind of hunt them down. And that was good for me too. “[Marilyn Nelson’s] poem’s acknowledgement of the realities of racist violence — which some might have said in the abstract, that would make it dated — is sadly evergreen. So, it’s really important for poems to testify.” An endless curiosity and love of words are central to the life and work of Kevin Young ’92, poet, author, poetry editor at The New Yorker, and newly named director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. Young, who takes up his museum role in January, spoke with the Gazette about his passion for language, his Harvard time, and his goal of telling more “stories of Black lives and history.”Q&AKevin YoungGAZETTE: You are something of a polymath. You are interested in art, history, music, language, among other things. You have written over a dozen books of poems and two nonfiction works, with the latest on the history of the hoax. You were a curator of a poetry library, a professor of English and creative writing, a library director, and soon-to-be head of a museum. How do you see that all fitting together?YOUNG: For me, it’s just part of following the path. And especially, I think, African American studies, or culture, or poetry has this quality that, if not polymath, then means exploring lots of sides of writing. Many of the great poets from Langston Hughes to Gwendolyn Brooks also wrote fiction and great nonfiction. I think it all stems from being a poet and that [wide-ranging] curiosity. To me, poets draw connections between things that might not seem like they’re like each other, but are, and those kind of metaphors that you make in your poetry I try to make between art forms. Rather than weaving them together or connecting them, you’re kind of “uncovering the weave” as someone said. You’re showing what is already there. Sometimes that involves leaps of imagination.For me, writing my first nonfiction book like “The Grey Album: On the Blackness of Blackness” was really important because in it, I was trying to create almost a unified theory of Black culture. In it I talked a lot about storying and improvisation, and these kinds of ways that Black creators encode meaning — whether they’re enslaved or whether they’re making hip-hop in a basement somewhere. I really wanted to draw that connection. I realized that in some ways I was trying to write about what was Black about American culture — which turned out to be a lot, if not everything. And then at the same time, as I kept writing the book, I realized I was also trying to write about what was Black about Black culture, what was unique about it. And that quality, I think, is what makes it so special. And it’s something that it just so happens is explored in depth at the Schomburg Center and also now at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which I’m really excited to helm starting in January.GAZETTE: You mentioned the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. How did you make that transition from author, poet, teacher, and poetry curator to director of the center, a research library of the New York Public Library, and now to the head of the museum?YOUNG: I was teaching at Emory University, and I was also a curator in the archives there in its Rose Library. I was getting collections and papers, among them, Irish collections. (It was sort of amazing to come full circle with my former Harvard Professor Seamus Heaney, whose letters are there, for instance.) And then, I was realizing that there was something to be done at a place like the Schomburg Center, which for almost a century, has been gathering Black material, keeping it safe, and providing access to it. And that’s what really drew me there. During my time, we were able to really get a lot of collections — from James Baldwin to Sonny Rollins, from Harry Belafonte to Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Those kinds of archives were really important because one of the things we were doing was celebrating Harlem as this rich cultural capital, and all those people had a relationship to Harlem, either by birth or by longstanding connection. And so that was really important. And the National Museum to me is a chance to do that even more, telling that story through objects, exhibitions, and events to a broad audience.GAZETTE: What ways will you try to expand the story of the Black experience in your new role?YOUNG: The museum has done such a good job already of telling that story. While it’s been open only four years, it has had a huge impact. My goal is to really continue with that, to see how we can tell more stories of Black lives and history. I’m sure that art and perhaps poetry will play a big part in it. It already does there, but I will look to expand that. I’m thinking too about some of the digital conversations and innovations that are necessary in this moment — a moment that is both unprecedented, and sadly, quite precedented. And so trying to capture that in a museum setting, through collecting and curating, I think is really important.,GAZETTE: How do you think about approaching the work when so many stories of the Black experience are missing or have been intentionally deleted from the historic record?YOUNG: I think there is an element of recovery. And I think something like the anthology I’ve just released, highlighting Black poets from the colonial period to the present, shows that. But there are also lots of individual people and places that have preserved this material. And I think that’s one of the things that’s really powerful about the museum, for instance, as you see people coming out of the woodwork to donate things they’ve kept in their families, whether that’s family Bibles, or memorabilia, or things from fraternal organizations, or people’s personal activism and accounts. I think all of that is part of our archive that often lives in people’s houses, and in people’s memories. Black folks, I find, have been telling their stories for generations, and one of the things the museum has done is bring those things to light and bring them under one roof, and of course, provide them digitally, and that is why it’s a national treasure.GAZETTE: Have your goals or your approach to the museum’s mission changed given what many are calling a national reckoning on race?YOUNG: I think it’s only deepened and made it more urgent. Over the summer, at the Schomburg Center, we issued a Black Liberation Reading List that was incredibly popular. We had something like 30,000 electronic checkouts in a month via the New York Public Library’s e-reader app, SimplyE. So continuing that kind of digital work is critical at the museum. And I think people, especially right now, are looking for curated experiences for themselves and their kids — ways to explore this moment and talk about it with their youngsters. What the National Museum does with exhibitions that tell the whole story of African American history is so important, as well as how they can focus on one aspect of that history, from music to sports to World War I. I am eager to help tell those stories there, to audiences in person and online. “That was really important to me, to be able to try to write in a contemporary vein of driving the landscape or experiencing America from that inherent but often unspoken Black point of view.”last_img read more

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Dix Hills Puppy Theft Suspect Nabbed, Cops Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Krista KazanSuffolk County police say they have apprehended a woman wanted for stealing an $1,800 purebred Pug puppy from a Dix Hills pet store last month.Krista Kazan was arrested Saturday and charged with grand larceny for the alleged Feb. 17 theft of the puppy from Yippity Yap on East Jericho Turnpike.Crime Stoppers had released a surveillance photo of the woman stealing the dog. The pup was returned to the store by a family member the day after the surveillance photos were released, police said.The 43-year-old suspect was released without bail after being arraigned Sunday at First District Court in Central Islip. She is due back in court May 9.last_img read more

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Home auctions set to start spring selling season with a bang

first_imgSeveral people have tried to buy the Camp Hill home prior to the auction.“We have had a number of groups to try to buy it before hand, but have been unsuccessful, certainly the owners are motivated when it comes Saturday they want it sold.“We’ve got a couple of groups that have registered prior so that’s always encouraging and I think the owners motivation, having moved on themselves, they’re quite eager to see it sold.” The owners are committed elsewhere and want the property sold under auction conditions.Ray White South Brisbane selling principal Luke Croft has two properties lined up for the gavel this Saturday, including an “unusual” find in Spring Hill set to be auctioned at 11am.Mr Croft said 42 Hill St more than 50 people had inspected the property and it had proven popular due to its age. According to CoreLogic, the owners paid just $145,000 for 32 Percival Tce in 1987.According to CoreLogic, the owners paid just $145,000 for 32 Percival Tce in 1987.Ray White Sherwood/Graceville sales executive Lachlan Humble said more than 70 people had inspected the home, and some had even submitted offers prior to its scheduled auction.“We have had pre-auctions offers; we’re just working with the interested parties to register them before Saturday, if not on the day,” Mr Humble said. No. 42 Hill St, Spring Hill will go to auction at 11am on September 1, 2018.“It’s a pretty unusual house for Spring Hill, the fact that is not 80 to 100 years old like most of everything else around the area,” he said. Also having more than 70 inspections throughout the auction campaign is 131 Watson St, Camp Hill, which is set to go under the hammer at 9am.Ray White Stones Corner sales and marketing consultant Ben Cannon said interest had been strong.“Large blocks with post war homes in Camp Hill are often hard to come by, so this is certainly we’ve had a lot of inquiry,” Mr Cannon said. The city view from the Holland Park home that has been in the same family for more than 30 years.A Holland Park home that has been in the same family for more than 30 years has gained a lot of attention in the lead up to its onsite auction this Saturday, September 1, at 11am.center_img More than 70 people had inspected the home, and some had even submitted offers prior to its scheduled auction.He said it had been two years since a home with a similar position had hit the market.“A lot of the local owners in the area are showing interest, just because something like this doesn’t come up that often,” he said.“They love the home just because it’s perched up on the hill.“It’s a home that you can’t remove, you have to retain the character of the home, something that is very rare in a home. “A lot of people want to remove it just for the block of land, but due to Brisbane City Council restrictions it can’t be done.”Also having more than 70 inspections throughout the auction campaign is 131 Watson St, Camp Hill, which is set to go under the hammer at 9am.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours ago AUCTION ACTION: 42 Hill St, Spring Hill will go to auction at 11am on September 1, 2018.THE spring selling season will officially start this Saturday, with more than 70 properties lined up for the auctioneers’ gavel in the greater Brisbane region. The Spring Hill home is unusual due to its young age.“The house itself is about 15 years old and it’s very contemporary and private.“There’s two houses in the development and this one is down the back of the battle-axe driveway.“That’s still very private, three levels, very unusual construction, a lot of steel beams and corrugated iron.“There’s no lawn to mow, but there’s still multiple outdoor areas.“It really is the ultimate in inner city living.”His second listing at 45 Exeter St, West End, that’s going to auction at 1pm, already has two people registered to purchase. Two buyers have already registered to bid to buy 45 Exeter St, West End this Saturday.“I am heading over there soon to do another building and pest inspection, but we’ve had some solid pre-auction offers.”last_img read more

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Three Queensland properties ripe for renovation

first_img76 Seagull Ave, Mermaid Beach, is ready to be given a makeover.The Federal Government’s stimulus package has renewed buyers’ interest in doer-uppers. Anyone thinking of buying a home for renovation have been spurred on by the thought of being able to add $25,000 to their pot. Their are some restrictions to the free cash, which was offered as away to try and stimulate the construction and renovation sectors, which were at threat of grinding to a halt post COVID-19. The restriction include, not renovating a home costing more than $1.5million, applicants not earning more than $120,000 as a single or $200,000 as a couple and the money cannot be spent on ancillary builds, such as a pool or garage. Still, that leaves a number of people who can take advantage of the grant. Anyone seeking a holiday home by the sea, might want to turn their attention to 76 Seagull Avenue, Mermaid Beach on the state’s Gold Coast. Currently a three-bedroom, one bathroom beach shack, the property is a 200m stroll to the beach and is near to the popular Nobby’s Beach precinct of cafes and shops. Sitting on a 405sq m block it offers ambitious buyers an ideal renovation opportunity. It is on the market for $1.2 million through Richard Snowden of McGrath – Palm Beach. 206 Agnew Street, Morningside, could be lifted and built in underneath.In the Brisbane suburb of Morningside, you can pick up this traditional Queenslander at 206 Agnew Street for about $685,000 through Kylee Harnisch of REMAX Results. On the market for the first time, it’s tidy and charming, so you could move straight in while you decide what to do with an abundance of underutilised space beneath the house. This currently features a series of multi-purpose rooms, a workshop and storage areas, along with a single carport at the front. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus9 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market9 hours agoThe potential is endless for anyone with imagination to renovate this three-bedroom home with high ceilings, original cornicing and casement windows and sits on northerly facing 405 sq m block. 270 Kent St, Teneriffe, is a perfect choice for an inner-city renovation project.The properties in Brisbane’s Teneriffe are some of the most coveted thanks to the suburb’s central location and architect-designed homes. The potential to join them is possible for someone who picks up the six-bedroom renovator at 270 Kent Street. Occupying a 506sq m allotment with dual access, it presents the perfect foundation to build upon. The two-storey home as is has a spacious upper level with timber flooring throughout and open-plan main living area, large kitchen and sliding bifold doors that open out onto a rear deck overlooking a verdant backyard. The property is open to expressions of interest through Sarah Hackett and Charmaine McDonald of Place Bulimba estate agency.last_img read more

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Bulldogs Track Season Opener Finally Takes Place

first_imgAlthough the air still had a little bite to it, the sun was shining and the Batesville Bulldogs track and field teams finally got to open up their season, after getting rained out last weekend. The Bulldogs traveled to Franklin County for their dual meet against the Wildcats. Both the boys and the girls start the season with a win having very similar scores. The girls won 95-37 with the boys winning 93-39.Batesville swept all of the relays with the girls bringing home 10 of the other 13 eventsand the boys 8. The Bulldogs showed their depth as 8 different girls won those 10 individual events and 6 out of the 8 individuals for the boys.Bringing home those blue ribbons were: 100m dash: Sophie Meadows (13.04) and Zach Mears (11.6); 110m hurdles: Garrett Wagner (15.99); 200m dash: Stephanie Nobbe (27.47); 300m hurdles: Clare Bruns (51.56) and Garrett Wagner (41.40); 400m dash: Haylee Harmeyer (1:04) and John Moody (53.71); 800m run: Sarah Poltrack (2:32) and Connor Bell (2:07); 1600m run: Sarah Poltrack (5:33) and Caleb Moster (4:50); 3200m run: Mary Poltrack (12:34) and Caleb Moster (10:40); High Jump: Morgan Meyer (4’6”) and Tim Tunny (5’6”); Shot Put: Samantha Heidlage (33’8”); Discus: Samantha Heidlage (87’4”); 4 x 100 relay teams of: Clare Bruns, Sophie Meadows, Morgan Meyer and Stephanie Nobbe (52.47) and Jacob Koehne, CJ Thomas, John Gerstbauer and Zach Mears (45.8); 4 x 400 relays teams of: Clare Bruns, Madeleine Robben, Sarah Poltrack and Haylee Harmeyer (4:34.4) and Garrett Wagner, Connor Bell, Jacob Koehne and John Moody (3:45.55); and the 4 x 800 relay teams of: Sarah Poltrack, Emma Gausman, Maria Wessel and Mary Poltrack (10:43.9) and Caleb Moster, Clay Yeaton, Quinten Gowdy and Connor Bell (8:53).Second place finishers were: 100m dash: Stephanie Nobbe; 100m/110m hurdles: Clare Bruns and Nathan Bedel; 200m dash: Madeleine Robben, John Moody; 300m hurdles: Chris Laymon; 400m dash: Madeleine Robben and Ian Yorn; 800m run: Emma Gausman and Michael Ripperger; 1600m run: Emma Gausman and Connor Bell; 3200m run: Maria Wessel and Clay Yeaton; High Jump: Hannah Canady and Kevin Bedel; Long Jump: Stephanie Nobbe and John Moody; and Pole Vault: Nathan Bedel.Finishing out the scoring for the night and taking 3rd place were: 110m hurdles: Chris Laymon; 100m dash: Morgan Meyer; 300m hurdles: Kasey Barrett and Henry Lipinski; 800m run: Quinten Gowdy; 1600m run: Clay Yeaton; 3200m run: Kylie Lehman and Jackson Wooldridge; High Jump: Adam Bedel; Shot Put: Kevin Bedel; and Discus: Adam Bedel.Many Bulldogs opened up their season with a personal best and they were:  110m hurdles-Garrett Wagner and Chris Laymon; 200m dash-John Moody, Gavin Koester and Ridge Douglas; 300m hurdles-Garrett Wagner and Chris Laymon; 400m dash-Ian Yorn; 800m run-Sarah Poltrack and Quinten Gowdy; 1600m run-Sarah Poltrack and Emma Gausman; 3200m run-Jackson Wooldridge; 4 x 400m split-Garrett Wagner, Connor Bell, Ian Yorn, Chris Laymon, Quinten Gowdy; 4 x 800m split-Emma Gausman, Quinten Gowdy, Jackson Wooldridge and Ian Yorn; Long Jump-Chris Laymon; Shot Put-Tim Tunny; Discus-Tim Tunny; and Pole Vault-Nathan Bedel and Jackson Wooldridge.Great start to the 2016 season! The Bulldogs will travel to Lawrenceburg to take on the Tigers Thursday.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Lisa Gausman.last_img read more

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Distracted driving leads to Franklin County crash

first_imgFranklin County, In. — A single car crash resulted in minor injuries to two elderly ladies Friday.Valarie Totten, 61, of Brookville, was westbound on U.S. 52 and was pointing something out at her former residence. When she did, her vehicle drifted off the right side of the road and struck a culvert and a tree.Totten and Elizabeth Reyes, 62, of San Bernardino, Ca., were transported to a local hospital for treatment.last_img

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Will miss playing at Eden if games are shifted out: Kolkata Knight Riders skipper Dinesh Karthik

first_imgKolkata: Kolkata Knight Riders skipper Dinesh Karthik said here on Tuesday he would miss playing at the Eden Gardens terribly if some of their home games are shifted out to neutral venues because of the coming Lok Sabha polls.”I will really miss Kolkata because there is a certain vibe, certain energy playing at Eden. Playing in front of 60,000 cheering for you makes a massive difference,” Karthik told reporters on the sidelines of the Mayor’s Cup at Eden Gardens.”If we do miss a few games, I would miss Eden gardens terribly,” said Karthik.The IPL dates are likely to clash with the Lok Sabha elections towards the second-half of the tournament. The BCCI is considering possibility of changing the competition’s home and away format and making it venue-specific.Matches will be scheduled at neutral venues where polling would have already concluded or coming up at a later date.According to fixtures released for the first two weeks, KKR will play two home matches against Sunrisers Hyderabad on March 24 and Kings XI Punjab on March 27.Talking about the team, Karthik who took over the captaincy of the side last year said they have a slightly different team from last year and he is looking forward to the new season.”We are slightly different to the team we had last year. We are really looking forward to it as a team. We have realised what we lacked last year and we have added resources accordingly. Thus, we are a more well-rounded team this year,” the 33-year old said.The Kolkata outfit shelled out Rs 5 crore for West Indies all-rounder Carlos Brathwaite and another Rs 1.6 crore for New Zealand pacer Lockie Ferguson.They are additions to an already stacked side that has the likes of Sunil Narine, Andre Russell, Chris Lynn, Karthik and Kuldeep Yadav.Karthik will lead the team for the second season running and will look to continue the run-making heroics that yielded him 498 runs as the team’s highest scorer in the last campaign.Asked about his personal goal, Karthik said: “I am not somebody who sets goals per se. For some strange reason, it is not something I have enjoyed doing.””If we can go out there and put our best foot on the park, and the best we can, I will be very happy,” he said.Mumbai stalwart Abhishek Nayar, KKR’s academy coach and also one who Karthik credits for his recent success, was also present along with KKR Chief Executive Venky Mysore at the Eden Gardens.Asked about Karthik using IPL to prove a point to Indian selectors ahead of the ICC World Cup, Nayar said: “He has already made a statement playing for India. When he plays the IPL, it’s more about making sure his team wins. It’s more about KKR the team than DK the individual.””With the limited opportunities he has got for India, he has proven himself in the role he has been assigned in terms of being a finisher for the team. He has been consistent in doing that,” Nayar said. IANSAlso Read: Sports Newslast_img read more

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Texas Southern looks to extend streak vs MVSU

first_imgTexas Southern looks to extend streak vs MVSU Associated Press SQUAD LEADERSHIP: Mississippi Valley State’s Caleb Hunter has averaged 15 points while Torico Simmons has put up 11 points. For the Tigers, Tyrik Armstrong has averaged 14.1 points and 4.4 assists while Yahuza Rasas has put up 10.2 points and 8.4 rebounds.ACCURATE ARMSTRONG: Armstrong has connected on 45.7 percent of the 46 3-pointers he’s attempted and has gone 5 for 7 over the last three games. He’s also converted 82.8 percent of his free throws this season.WINLESS WHEN: The Tigers are 0-8 when they score 63 points or fewer and 12-5 when they exceed 63 points. The Delta Devils are 0-23 when allowing 73 or more points and 3-0 when holding opponents below 73.ASSIST-TO-FG RATIO: The Tigers have recently used assists to create baskets more often than the Delta Devils. Mississippi Valley State has 27 assists on 78 field goals (34.6 percent) over its previous three outings while Texas Southern has assists on 32 of 80 field goals (40 percent) during its past three games.DID YOU KNOW: Texas Southern has attempted 23.6 free throws per game this season, the 12th-highest rate in the country. Mississippi Valley State has gotten to the line far less frequently and is averaging only 14.8 foul shots per game (ranked 276th, nationally).___ Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditTexas Southern (12-13, 9-3) vs. Mississippi Valley State (3-23, 2-11)Harrison Complex, Itta Bena, Mississippi; Saturday, 5 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Texas Southern looks for its seventh straight win in the head-to-head series over Mississippi Valley State. Texas Southern has won by an average of 12 points in its last six wins over the Delta Devils. Mississippi Valley State’s last win in the series came on Jan. 23, 2017, a 103-89 win.center_img February 20, 2020 For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.comlast_img read more

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