Student reports assault

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) is investigating a sexual assault that occurred on campus over the weekend, according to an email sent to students Wednesday afternoon. The reported sexual assault occurred in a dorm during the early hours of Sunday morning, police said. The victim knew the person who allegedly committed the assault. “Sexual assault can happen to anyone,” the email stated. “College students are more likely to be assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger. This means that the person perpetrating the assault could be part of the campus community.” In the email, NDSP reminded students to be aware of their safety and watch out for friends to reduce the chances of a sexual assault. Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors or sexual assault can be found online with both NDSP and the Committee for Sexual Assault Prevention, the email stated.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s senior creates petition for improved campus safety, receives almost 1,500 signatures in three days

first_imgSaint Mary’s senior Darby Harcourt created a Change.org petition for “an improved security system and additional cameras” on campus on Friday, the same day that police recovered the body of Notre Dame senior Annrose Jerry from St. Mary’s Lake. By Monday, almost 1,500 people had signed in support.Though the petition was created in the wake of Jerry’s disappearance and later death on campus, Harcourt said other personal experiences had prompted her to demand change.She had been afraid for years, Harcourt said, and the events surrounding Jerry’s death inspired her to act.“I got really scared,” she said. “When I found out that happened, I called my dad and I said, ‘I want to make a petition.’”Harcourt said she used to park her car in the gravel lot at the back of campus, and was shocked to discover that there were no cameras installed overhead. When she wrote an email to the administration voicing her concerns, no one responded.In her petition, Harcourt describes an ever-present fear that she feels when walking alone.“As a woman in today’s world, I live in constant fear of being attacked or taken, regardless of where I am or what time of day it is,” the petition said. “Being on an all women campus, I believe there needs to be a stronger push in ensuring our students feel safe to walk around not only [on] campus, but also the school parking lots all times of the day.”For Harcourt, this fear manifested when she was a senior in high school and an unknown man attempted to hijack her car in a Target parking lot.“Someone tried to get into my car and drive off with me and take me at a Target at 9 p.m. when everyone was around,” Harcourt said. “Luckily, I freaked out and got away. And even though he ran after me, I ran up to up to random people, and … I got home safe.”Since this incident, Harcourt said she is always especially cautious when walking through parking lots and entering parked cars. She said this experience catalyzed her requests for heightened surveillance and safety on campus at Saint Mary’s.“Currently, our school parking lots do not have adequate lighting or any form of camera system, which is not only a red flag but extremely unsafe for every individual on campus,” the petition said.In the petition, Harcourt asks that the College install more cameras throughout campus, paying specific attention to the parking lots.“My main concern is just having those cameras where we can just feel a little safer,” she said. “Just being able to walk around and feeling secure. You know, things still will happen even with cameras … but with people knowing that there’s cameras, it’ll be less.”Harcourt also suggests the addition of security checkpoints at the entrances and exits to campus.She especially emphasized the need for increased safety at the intersection of State Route 933, where The Avenue becomes St. Mary’s Road.“Freshman year, we — and this is sad that I have to say this — but freshman year you learn that that road is called Rape Road,” Harcourt said. “That’s already a concern in itself. It takes one time. Prevent it now. Don’t wait until it happens.”At the same time, Harcourt said she believes Saint Mary’s is largely a safe place to live, though she still sees room for improvement.“I’m not saying that Saint Mary’s isn’t safe, I’m saying it could be safer,” she said. “Everywhere I go, I feel unsafe. It’s not just Saint Mary’s. But I want this place to be safe. I love everyone here, And I know Saint Mary’s wants the same thing.”Safety improvements should be made all across the tri-campus community, Harcourt added.“For all of the three institutions, I know there is much to be done to improve the student’s safety and desperately hope Saint Mary’s recognizes this need as well, as our safety is at risk,” the petition said. “I want to be safe, and I want my peers to be safe. There needs to be immediate change. This is more important now than ever.”Since sharing the petition on Friday, Harcourt said she has felt encouraged by the growing support from both current students, their parents and alumnae. The response had been largely positive, she said, with some people contributing their own ideas on how to improve campus safety.“It’s kind of weird to see how many people actually signed it,” she said. “I was crying all of Saturday. It was just nice to see that people believed in what I said.”Interim vice president of student affairs Linda Timm responded to Harcourt’s petition by encouraging students to reach out to the campus security office to make them aware of any areas of safety concern.“The safety of our students is our primary concern,” Timm said in an email. “As such, we continually look at information that helps us provide a more secure environment. One source of such information is from our campus community who let us know if there is an area that could benefit from better lighting, or a security camera, or even maintenance on a hedge that might hinder a sightline.”Safety has been a major initiative within the leadership of the College, Timm said, and plans are in motion to install updated cameras throughout campus.“Planning has been in process for several months to replace old analogue cameras with digital,” she said. “We currently have all of the hardware to install more than 70 new security cameras around campus. Currently, our director of facilities and our interim director of campus safety are determining the location of each of these cameras, and encourage input from students and faculty.”Security officers traveling the campus perimeter also provide 24/7 monitoring of the property, Timm said.“It’s important that our entire campus community — students, faculty, and staff — feel confident of their safety,” she said. “We have, and will continue to, invest in measures to ensure this.”The administration has yet to contact Harcourt and respond to her petition directly, but Harcourt said she plans on approaching them with her specific ideas on how to improve campus safety.Tags: Annrose Jerry, cameras, Campus Safety, Dr. Linda Timm, petition, Saint Mary’s Campus Safetylast_img read more

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20 Under A “Precautionary Quarantine” In County, Still No Confirmed Cases

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Do you wonder why? Because Chautauqua County has no tests!!! I’m one in quarantine!!,Sharon , They quarantined you but they won’t test you ? MAYVILLE – The Chautauqua County Department of Health says there are now 20 people under a “precautionary quarantine” as the novel Coronavirus pandemic continues.So far no cases of COVID-19, the novel Coronavirus, have been confirmed by lab testing.Officials say the blood supply at local hospitals has been threatened by the outbreak. If residents are healthy and eligible, officials are asking them to donate blood.Health officials say as long as residents remain in good health, maintain social distancing, good hygiene, and common sense, there’s still a lot of things to do in Chautauqua County. They recommend detaching from screens, get off the couch, and to the best of your abilities, see this as an opportunity to shake up the daily routine by enjoying the outdoors.last_img read more

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Governor’s Office Anticipating COVID-19 Clusters As Colleges Reopen

first_imgVia SUNY JCC / Facebook.ALBANY – As local colleges welcome students back on campus, the Governor’s Office is preparing for what to do in case there is an outbreak of COVID-19.Governor Cuomo says the state is anticipating clusters of COVID-19 outbreaks to happen once students head back into their college classrooms.Because of this, the state has designated a threshold that says colleges must go remote for two weeks if there are 100 COVID-19 cases, or the number of cases on campus equals 5% of their population or more.Ultimately Cuomo says whichever scenario happens first will lead to the college going remote for at least two weeks. “We should anticipate clusters. When you have large congregations of people, anticipate a cluster. We know that. Also, that’s what we’re seeing, you see it around the country. Be prepared for it, get ahead of it,” Cuomo said.If a college has to go remote, students who live on campus can stay on campus, Cuomo says.This announcement comes as some Western New York colleges are seeing their own positive COVID-19 cases. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Fire ant control

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaWhen it comes to killing fire ants, one University of Georgia expert dances around the problem. UGA Cooperative Extension entomologist Dan Suiter recommends the Texas two-step approach to controlling fire ants. The fire ant death dance works like this:Step one1. Wait until the evening when it’s cooler. Ants don’t forage when it’s hot, or when the dew is out. Use a hand-held fertilizer spreader to broadcast bait granules, such as Once and Done or Amdro. This can be done either around a yard or in a 4-foot circle around each mound. Make sure not to disturb the mound.“Wear gloves, and spread the bait around,” Suiter said. “If you smoke and get smoke smell on the bait, the ants won’t touch it. Or if you have gasoline on your hands, the ants won’t touch it.”Step two2. Give the bait a week to 10 days to work. Then, kick the ant mounds – or poke them with a stick – and step back quickly. If there is any ant activity, use a contact insecticide to target the mounds. To do this, mix the powdered insecticide with water following the package’s directions. “Get a long stick and run it down through the center of the mound,” Suiter said. “It should push like a hot knife through butter. Pull the stick out quickly and pour in the premixed insecticide.”The insecticide must be poured quickly because the ants will start running away once the mound is disturbed. A premixed gallon or two of insecticide should fill the mound from the bottom up.When the insecticide has been applied, the Texas two-step is done, until next year.Read lables and use pesticides properly“When working with fire ant baits or other insecticides, always read the product’s label,” Suiter said. Misuse of pesticides, like fire ant control products, is a violation of federal law. A lot of misuse comes from homeowners who think that what they put out isn’t strong enough to kill the ants, he said.“The chemicals are pretty much the same as professional chemicals,” Suiter said. “The professional products are usually better formulated, but in general, the active ingredients are similar.” Homeowner misuse of insecticides has resulted in some active ingredients, like bifenthrin, showing up at unacceptable levels in lakes and streams. “It’s a granular insecticide put on people’s yards,” Suiter said. “With overuse, it’s winding up in lakes and streams.”Make them sick, bring in their enemiesResearchers with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are exploring the use of natural enemies and viruses to control the stinging pests. Viruses are showing good promise but are still in the research stage, Suiter said.UGA scientists have released phorid flies, a natural enemy of the fire ant, in various locations across Georgia. Discovered in South America by a USDA-ARS team from Gainesville, Fla., the fly lays its eggs in the fire ant. When the larva emerges, it decapitates the ant. Scientists think fire ants first entered the U.S. from Argentina on cargo ships docked in Alabama in the 1930s. Every spring, fire ants fly hundreds of feet into the air to mate. They can land several feet, or even miles, from their original location.Fire ants were first reported in Georgia in the 1950s. Their mating-flights have taken them as far east as North Carolina and as far west to Texas. The ants have also spread through nursery plants to states like Arizona and California.last_img read more

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Poinsettia care

first_imgPoinsettias are the best selling potted plant in the United States, with 34.7 million plants being produced in 2011 alone. Unfortunately, popularity doesn’t always guarantee survival. Come February or March, many of these cheery decorative Christmas gifts are droopy, yellowed or worse — in the trash. Poinsettia plants can last for years if they are treated right, said Paul Thomas, professor of horticulture at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Poinsettias come in several colors, including scarlet, ivory, pink and mauve. The colorful part that we might consider the poinsettia flower is actually a collection of colored leaves called bracts. The plants true flower is the tiny yellow bloom in the middle of the bract called a cyathia. To have the best chance of surviving past the holidays, poinsettias need to be healthy and strong before you bring them home. Thomas recommends purchasing poinsettias from a florist’s shop or nursery to get the best quality plants. Before you buy a poinsettia inspect it to make sure it has strong, sturdy stems, dense foliage all the way down its stems, that its bracts have no blemishes and its small yellow flowers have just barely opened. You can also carefully remove the plant from its pot to inspect the plant’s root system. If the plant has just a few roots or lots of dark brown roots, don’t buy it. Healthy poinsettias have plenty of tan and white roots. Basic poinsettia care These plants are susceptible to root rot, so don’t overwater them or let them sit in water filled saucers. The holiday foil that florists wrap around some poinsettia pots can trap water in the pot, so it’s best to remove it. Only water when the soil surface feels dry, and just water them until water drains out of the bottom of the pot. Since the plants are native to Mexico, they prefer at least six hours of bright light a day and temperatures between 65 and 70 degrees. However, they can spend a few weeks on a fireplace hearth or in the shade of a Christmas tree with the proper care. “During the holidays, you can place poinsettias just about anywhere to liven things up,” Thomas said. “They’ll last about three weeks in fairly dark places. “While it’s in the dark, water only when the soil is dry. And don’t fertilize it. Overwatering or fertilizing your poinsettia during the holidays when it is in dark conditions is the most common cause of rapid death.” After the holidaysWhile your cleaning up after the holidays, move your poinsettia to a sunny window and apply a little houseplant fertilizer. “The bracts may begin to fall off fast,” Thomas said. “This is normal. If they last until March, your poinsettia was very happy where you put it.” In April cut the plant back to about 10 inches or until there are four to six nodes of the stem above the soil. “At this point, the poinsettia can be grown outdoors in full sun,” Thomas said. “If watered and fertilized, poinsettias will grow great outdoors. Trim them in June and plant them in 1-gallon pots or large indoor planters.” An outdoor poinsettia needs to be fertilized every week with a basic houseplant fertilizer during the spring and summer. “If watered and fertilized properly, poinsettias will grow quite large, as high and wide as 5 feet,” Thomas said. To force your repotted poinsettia to bloom, cover the plant after 6 p.m. starting September 22 and uncover it at 7 a.m. Do this until about November 10. This process will trigger the poinsettia to make new colorful bracts and flowers just in time for the holidays.last_img read more

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Fletcher Allen reaches milestone in nursing recruitment

first_imgFletcher Allen Health Care Reaches First Milestone in NursingRecruitment and Retention Campaign;28 Registered Nurses Signed to DateBURLINGTON – Fletcher Allen Health Care announced today that it hasreached the first milestone in its nursing recruitment and retentioncampaign. Twenty-eight nurses have signed up through the program todate.The comprehensive recruitment and retention plan – which aims to hire100 nurses in 100 days – is designed to attract nurses to the academichealth center and to retain the nurses who work there. The campaign runsfrom August 2 to November 9.In the first three weeks of the campaign, Fletcher Allen received 63contacts and conducted 37 interviews, which have resulted in 28 nurseswho have increased their hours or joined Fletcher Allen.Of the 28 nurses, five are Fletcher Allen nurses who increased theirhours; 16 are new to the organization; six are former Fletcher Allennurses who were re-hired; and one is a traveler, or temporary nurse, whoconverted to permanent status.”The success we’ve had to date is very encouraging, ” said Chief NursingOfficer Mary Botter, Ph.D., R.N. “This campaign represents a strongcommitment by Fletcher Allen to address our nursing shortage and enhanceour ability to deliver high-quality care.”Fletcher Allen and the Vermont Federation of Nurses and HealthProfessionals announced the 100 Nurses/100 Days campaign on July 30th.The campaign includes a direct mail and advertising campaign and avariety of financial incentives for:* Current Fletcher Allen employees who refer nurses to FletcherAllen* Current “per diem” nurses who increase their commitment toeither part-time or full-time* Part-time nurses who increase to full-time* Nurses who join the organization on a part-time or full-timebasis.All sign-on bonuses are offered in two payments – half at 90 days andthe remaining half after one year, with a required employment commitmentof two years.In the area of nurse retention, there are several ongoing effortsalready underway to help foster a work environment that ensures nurseretention. In addition, following a series of discussions with theFederation of Nursing and Health Professionals, Fletcher Allen hasagreed to take several actions to support retention, including reopeningdiscussions with the union about wages for current nurses.For detailed information on the campaign, and a complete list offinancial incentives, visit www.FletcherAllen.org(link is external) and click on the 100 Nurses in 100 Dayssymbol.last_img read more

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VEDA approves $3 million in financing

first_imgThe Vermont Economic Development Authority has approved $3 million in financing to support Vermont business and agricultural development projects totaling $9.5 million, including to the Vermont Agricultural Credit Corporation and The Essex. Investments in Vermont s agricultural economy represent a third of our lending this month, said Jo Bradley, VEDA s Chief Executive Officer. Additional investments in the travel and tourism sector of Vermont s economy were approved, and the Authority will assist in the financing of several small business, drinking water system, and energy conservation projects.The Authority approved:$1.04 million in farm ownership and operating loans through the Authority s agricultural financing program, the Vermont Agricultural Credit Corporation;Essex Inn Partners, Ltd., Essex Financing of $1.3 million was approved as part of a $6 million project to finance improvements at The Essex (formerly the Inn at Essex). Chittenden Bank is also participating in the project. The Project improvements include the Inn s new 13,200 sq ft. spa center and indoor pool, a more efficient HVAC system for the whole Inn, a new culinary kitchen allowing the Inn to expand its culinary programs for guests, and other renovations that will add six new guest rooms, a new boardroom and a game room.  The Inn currently employs 56, a number projected to more than double to 112 within three years as a result of the Project.In addition, VEDA approved:$324,764 to repair or improve existing privately-owned drinking water systems through the Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund;$320,000 for several small business development projects through the Vermont Small Business Loan Program; and$64,152 through the Vermont Business Energy Conservation Loan Program to help small businesses make energy efficiency and conservation improvements.VEDA s mission is to promote economic prosperity in Vermont by providing financial assistance to eligible businesses, including manufacturing, agricultural, and travel and tourism enterprises. Since its inception in 1974, VEDA has made financing commitments totaling over $1.4 billion. For more information about VEDA, visit www.veda.org(link is external) or call 802-828-5627.last_img read more

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SOUTHCOM Participated with Partner Nations in Tradewinds 2015

first_imgAnd in September 2008, the U.S. government sent humanitarian aid to Haiti worth $19.5 million to assist victims of four weather-related disasters — tropical storms Fay and Hanna, and hurricanes Gustav and Ike — that left 328 dead and 114,000 homeless. Furthermore, a U.S. naval vessel, the USS Kearsarge, delivered to Haiti approximately 466 metric tons of emergency food, and approximately 5,867 liters of water. “In the end, the training exercises among naval forces allow for greater cooperation to deal with new threats and lead to better public relations between allied countries in the region,” Oliva Posada said. Exchanging knowledge and experience The Tradewinds exercises support the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI), created in 2010, under which the United States donated $263 million in equipment and training against traffic in weapons and drugs in the region. The training also enables the Armed Forces from different nations to develop protocols that will give them more efficient and quicker responses, in addition to learning the different methods traffickers use to smuggle drug shipments from South America to major areas in Central America and the Caribbean. By Dialogo June 30, 2015 For example, after the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, U.S. forces mobilized close to 20,000 troops as well as Coast Guard cutters, U.S. Navy ships, and dozens of aircraft to offer aid to Haiti, according to information from SOUTHCOM. During that mission, they delivered thousands of tons of food and water, and provided medical attention. SOUTHCOM worked with local and international authorities to meet the need over the long term. Caribbean Basin Security Initiative “The primary benefits to the navies are to work in a coordinated manner, establish confidence protocols in the exchange of information codes, getting to know other Naval forces, and developing technology applied to a military career, such that they can anticipate and, in the event of a crisis, react immediately and in an organized fashion,” Oliva Posada said. “I recently came from doing special duties, and I have only been in the military for a little over a year, [so the Tradewinds exercises are] something I always wanted to do,” said Private Victor Adana, an infantryman with the Belize Defence Force. “My favorite part was the close quarters battle training. A lot of it I had done before but never with so many other countries. In the beginning we all had so many ways of doing things and as the training went on we all seemed to adapt to one universal way, and that is something I’ll never forget.” Other countries that participated in Tradewinds 2015 included the Caribbean countries of Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, in addition to Mexico and the United Kingdom. Indeed, Tradewinds 2015 benefited from broad international participation. About 1,350 U.S. service members joined in the combined exercises; the U.S. Coast Guard, together with U.S. Navy units, have participated in training programs with Navies from partner nations for 31 years. Additionally, during the ground portion of the exercises, Marines from Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force-Southern Command (SPMAGTF-SC), 2d Law Enforcement Battalion, along with the Canadian Army, conducted subject matter expert exchanges with other partner nation militaries on techniques in marksmanship and weapons handling skills, security operations in jungle and riverine environments, military support to law enforcement, and command and control. center_img Through Tradewinds and similar operations, SOUTHCOM helps strengthen interoperability in Caribbean countries and works with partner nations to develop responses to natural disasters and humanitarian crises, and to fight against transnational organized crime, said Javier Oliva Posada, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Tradewinds is a joint and combined annual exercise that takes place at various locations in the Caribbean and involves the region’s navies, maritime security corps, and Coast Guards. Several Caribbean countries, as well as Mexico, Canada, and the United States, are participating in Phase II of the Tradewinds 2015 maritime Military training initiative coordinated by the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) in Belize. The goal of the program is to strengthen regional cooperation in complex, multinational security operations, including humanitarian and rescue missions. “It’s important for the partner nations to work together because in today’s environment no country does it alone,” said Lieutenant Colonel David Hudak, commanding officer of Special Purpose-Marine Air Ground Task Force, SOUTHCOM. “The countries face similar challenges and if they are working together the better they can be in combating those challenges and the major challenges in this region are the trafficking of drugs weapons and human trafficking.” The second, which culminated in Belize, took place from June 15-24 and focused on maritime and land operations. In particular, it focused on the exchange of knowledge and experiences to strengthen capabilities in weapons handling, sharpshooting techniques, security operations in riverside and rainforest environments, as well as Military support for law enforcement forces, the use of non-lethal arms, crime scene investigation, jungle survival skills, martial arts, maritime operations, and scuba diving skills. “Tradewinds offers an opportunity to develop and strengthen our alliances and helps all participants protect their national security,” said U.S. Marine Corps General John F. Kelly, commander of SOUTHCOM. Extensive training During the exercises, officials use tools such as radar systems, go-fast boats, light weaponry (30mm machine guns), saltwater-resistant standard weapons, and special equipment to approach and board the type of boats traditionally used by organized crime and turbine artillery helicopters used to pursue vessels, according to Daniel Pou, an assistant analyst and researcher at the Latin American School of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in the Dominican Republic. The U.S. government has worked in close cooperation with the region’s countries to cooperate on humanitarian and disaster assistance initiatives in recent years. The first phase of Tradewinds 2015, from May 30-June 9, began on the island of St. Kitts and Nevis and covered maritime security and disasters. Participants evaluated the mechanisms for response and coordination in the event of a catastrophe through theory, practice, and training simulations in security, allowing service members to improve their ability to respond. last_img read more

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WHO raises avian flu case count to 97

first_imgMay 19, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) has significantly increased its tally of H5N1 avian influenza cases on the basis of information from Vietnam, bringing the total to 97 cases, including 53 deaths. The agency previously listed 89 cases with 52 deaths.In announcing the numbers today, the WHO did not identify any of the added cases individually, but said Vietnam’s Ministry of Health has been asked to provide data on individual cases.The new tally implies that some confirmed cases have gone unreported by major news media. The numbers push the WHO’s count above an unofficial count maintained by CIDRAP on the basis of both WHO numbers and media reports of confirmed cases. The unofficial count stood at 92 cases with 53 deaths before the new WHO announcement.The new WHO numbers represent an overall case-fatality rate of about 55%. Until recently, the fatality rate had hovered in the 70% range.A new WHO table of H5N1 cases breaks them down into three time periods: Dec 26, 2003, to Mar 10, 2004; July 19 to Oct 8, 2004; and Dec 16, 2004, to May 13, 2005.In the latest wave of cases, Vietnam has had 17 deaths among 49 cases, according to the WHO, for a fatality rate of about 35%. Since December 2003, the country has had a total of 76 cases with 37 deaths, for a fatality rate of 49%.Thailand has had 12 deaths among 17 cases, all of them occurring in the first two time periods. Cambodia’s four cases—all fatal—have all occurred since mid-December.See also:May 19 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_05_19/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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