Lessons from a master

first_imgHarvard University announced today (April 4) that Wynton Marsalis will launch a two-year performance and lecture series on April 28, with an appearance at Sanders Theatre. Currently the artistic director of jazz at Lincoln Center, Marsalis is an accomplished musician, composer, bandleader, and educator who has made the promotion of jazz and cultural literacy his hallmark causes.“Wynton Marsalis is both an internationally acclaimed musician and a leader in educating people about the importance of arts and culture,” Harvard President Drew Faust said. “We are fortunate to have an artist and performer of his caliber on campus to enhance the University’s vibrant arts scene and engage our students, staff, and faculty.”Marsalis plans to make several visits to campus, for two to three days at a time, over the next two years, lecturing on a variety of topics to illuminate the relationship between American music and the American identity. His talks will be punctuated with performances by dancers, Marsalis’ quintet, and other ensembles, including a New Orleans parade band and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.His lecture performance on April 28, titled “Music as Metaphor,” will feature Ali Jackson (drums), Dan Nimmer (piano), Walter Blanding Jr. (tenor sax), Carlos Henriquez (bass), James Chirillo (guitar and banjo), and Mark O’Connor (violin). The following day, Marsalis will teach a master class to high school musicians at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School.Marsalis’ appointment is the latest example of the University’s closer embrace of the arts since a presidential task force called in 2008 for a concerted effort to increase the presence of the arts on campus.“I am delighted that Harvard has recognized the need to make cultural literacy an integral part of its curriculum,” Marsalis said. “I hope that other institutions will follow suit to foster a deeper appreciation among all Americans for the democratic victory of our cultural legacy.”Since 2008, there has been a renewed focus on bringing prominent artists to campus to engage students and the wider community in the kind of imaginative and innovative thinking that is central to the life of the University.For example, renowned large-scale artist Krzysztof Wodiczko now teaches at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, while this semester Tony-nominated Diane Paulus, artistic director for the Harvard University American Repertory Theater, is teaching “Porgy and Bess: Performance in Context” at Harvard College.  Last year, Harvard announced that the Silk Road Project, founded by renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma, would move its headquarters to Harvard. And this fall, renowned choreographer Liz Lerman, MacArthur grant recipient and founder of the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange, will be a visiting lecturer in residence at Harvard.A native of New Orleans, Marsalis is one of America’s most celebrated cultural figures. In addition to nine Grammy awards, he was the first jazz musician to receive the Pulitzer Prize for Music. His numerous international accolades include an honorary membership in Britain’s Royal Academy of Music, the highest decoration for a non-British citizen, and the insignia Chevalier of the Legion of Honor, France’s highest distinction.  He has more than 70 albums to his credit, which have sold over 7 million copies worldwide. By creating and performing an expansive range of brilliant new music for quartets to big bands, chamber music ensembles to symphony orchestras, and tap dance to ballet, Marsalis has expanded the vocabulary of jazz and created a vital body of work that places him among the world’s finest musicians and composers. Harvard awarded him an honorary doctorate in music in 2009.Tickets for Marsalis’ lecture performance at Sanders Theatre will be free of charge, and will become available to the Harvard community on Tuesday (April 12), and to the general public on Thursday (April 14). For more information.last_img read more

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B’way Community Pays Respects, Shares Memories of the Late David Bowie

first_imgRock icon David Bowie died at the age of 69 on January 10, following a long battle with cancer. The boundary pusher and trailblazer of glam made a tremendous impact on artists of all mediums—theater included. Bowie performed on Broadway himself as a replacement headliner in The Elephant Man. In his final years, the ultimate multi-hyphenate also composed for the stage. Lazarus, a musical riff on the 1963 novel and 1976 Bowie-led film The Man Who Fell to Earth, is currently playing off-Broadway’s New York Theatre Workshop through January 20 and features original Bowie numbers and new arrangements of his famous works. His music video for the title number was released just earlier this month.Numerous members of the Broadway community took to social media to pay their respects to the otherworldly performer. Take a look at what some had to say below. [View the story “Broadway reacts to the death of David Bowie” on Storify] View Commentslast_img read more

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Plan floated for large-scale baseload solar-plus-storage facility in Australia

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:UK billionaire Sanjeev Gupta is laying down a challenge to the coal and gas industry by putting forward a $1 billion plus solar and storage proposal in the federal Coalition’s planned tender for new 24/7 power generation.The proposal from Gupta’s Australian energy offshoot, Simec Zen Energy, is in line with its previously announced plans to power the Whyalla steelworks he now owns – along with other large energy users – with cheap reliable power via a mix of large scale solar, battery storage and pumped hydro.News of Gupta’s proposal comes as the government confirms that 66 different projects were put forward in response to the government’s request for proposals, with gas plants forming the largest number, and plans for new coal plants, expansions and extensions accounting for another 10 coal investments.The biggest among these is a $6 billion proposal for two new coal plants in Victoria, put forward by Trevor St Baker, the co-owner of the ageing Vales Point coal generator in NSW. Any such move would likely need an indemnity from the federal government against a future carbon price, potentially costing around $7 billion, analysts and industry bodies say.Gupta’s plans, however, emerge as a significant challenge to the push by the coal lobby to fulfil the wish by many in the Coalition and their funders to breathe new life into the coal industry, if not into the atmosphere. Simec Zen may not be the only party with a proposed combination of wind or solar with battery or pumped hydro storage, but it is likely the only one that can guarantee an off-take agreement – with Gupta’s own steelworks.Simec Zen’s proposal is to combine solar, battery storage and longer-term storage via pumped hydro using pits from the nearby iron ore mines that once supplied the steel smelter. The pumped hydro facility at the Middleback mine would deliver around 110MW and six to eight hours of storage, but the capacity could be doubled to 220MW should an upgrade to the transmission line to the Eyre Peninsula proposed by ElectraNet go ahead. That would take the total cost of the Simec Zen proposal to around $1.3 billion.More: Gupta challenges coalers with $1 billion plus solar and storage plan Plan floated for large-scale baseload solar-plus-storage facility in Australialast_img read more

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5 reasons your best employees quit

first_img 386SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details They’re not going anywhereOver time, employees get tired of doing the exact same thing day after day. If you’re not moving forward, then you must not be going anywhere. Employees want to feel valued and important, and when you’re not advancing, it’s hard to feel appreciated. Sometimes, no matter how hard you work, there’s no chance to climb the ladder. When that happens, your employees will look elsewhere for growth opportunities.They’re overworkedGood employees are usually capable of doing more work than they are initially asked, but this can become a problem when the workload eventually grows to a level even the best employee can’t handle. When this happens, they get burned out quickly and feel like they’re being taken advantage of. Use raises and title bumps to make sure your hardest working employees feel like they’re getting something in return for all of their hard work.They’re not recognizedAnytime an employee does a great job, you should let them know. Being recognized lets your employees know that they’re doing a great job and it’s also a great motivator. Maybe you can’t afford to hand out bonuses left and right, but you can always speak a few words of appreciation.They don’t feel cared forCulture plays a huge part in keeping employees happy. Money is important, but when its valued more than the people who make profits possible, you’ll have a big problem. It’s not easy to work hard for someone who cares more about your production than your well-being. The more detached you are from your employees personally, the more employees you’ll have to eventually replace.It’s not funWork is business, but it should also be a place your employees want to be. By making your office a little more fun, you’ll have loyal employees that will help add to the positive atmosphere for a long time.last_img read more

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Empathy through technology

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Not everyone can understand the details, nuances, and challenges around today’s technologies. But Ram Ridgeway does.As director of retail support at $3.63 billion asset Wright-Patt Credit Union (WPCU) in Beavercreek, Ohio, Ridgeway gained this understanding while moving up in the ranks of the organization during the past decade.He describes retail support as “our back-office operations.” That’s a simplified way to say he oversees online and mobile banking, card products, the ATM and personal teller machine fleet, deposit products, and processing mailed-in checks.“We look at our responsibilities through the lenses of supporting retail partners/employees, channel management, and vendor management,” Ridgeway explains.last_img read more

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Avian flu case in Indonesia confirmed

first_imgSep 16, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Tests have confirmed that an Indonesian woman who died Sep 10 had H5N1 avian influenza, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced today.The woman’s case had been listed as probable on the basis of an initial test. Further testing at a WHO reference laboratory in Hong Kong confirmed the case, the WHO said. The woman fell ill Aug 31 and was hospitalized in Jakarta Sep 3, the agency said.How the woman became infected was still unknown. Because of where she lived, she had “multiple opportunities for exposure to chickens and ducks,” but no recent poultry deaths had been reported in the area, the WHO said.The WHO listed the woman’s case as only the second laboratory-confirmed case of H5N1 avian flu in Indonesia, but Indonesian officials have reported four previous cases. Those included a 38-year-old man and his two young daughters who died in July and a farm worker who tested positive for antibodies to the virus last March, though he had not been sick.The WHO said today the 38-year-old man tested positive for the virus, but the results for his daughters “did not meet criteria for H5N1 infections.”The latest confirmed case brings CIDRAP’s unofficial count of Asia’s H5N1 cases since late 2003 to 121, with 63 deaths. Those numbers include the other four Indonesian cases but exclude the case of a 58-year-old Vietnamese man who died in late August and had tested positive, but whose final test results have not yet been reported.Indonesian Health Minister Siti Fadillah Supari said officials have taken blood samples from people who had contact with the deceased 37-year-old woman, according to an Agence France-Presse report today. Without giving details, Supari said one contact was suspected to have been infected, but remained healthy.See also:Sep 16 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_09_16/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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PFA Pension to invest up to DKK20bn in Danish companies

first_imgDenmark’s biggest commercial pension fund PFA said it plans to invest between DKK15bn (€2bn) and DKK20bn in Danish businesses over the next five years, preferring to remain a minority shareholder in the companies.In an interview with Danish financial daily Børsen, Henrik Heideby, group head and chief executive at PFA, said: “We will increase investments by up to 10% of our total holdings in the next five years. This corresponds to DKK30bn to DKK40bn. Half of that will be in Danish businesses.”PFA will invest broadly across sectors to spread its risk, he said.“We don’t want to be the main owner of companies,” he added. “Experience shows that businesses that are owned by pension funds alone do badly.”However, PFA could invest alongside a capital fund, he said, adding that many companies would like to have PFA as an investor, as it is seen as an endorsement.“We get a lot of inquiries,” he said.PFA is particularly interested in investing in larger companies, Heideby said. But since there is not such a huge range of big companies in Denmark, it is also possible PFA will gather a group of investments and invest jointly, he said.“There are many thoughts and possibilities about this,” he said.last_img read more

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Asset management roundup: Nuveen, Churchill create $21bn private capital platform

first_imgNuveen, the investment manager of US pension fund TIAA, is folding its private equity and junior capital group into Churchill Asset Management, its middle-market senior loan and unitranche financing business, to create a direct access platform with more than $21bn (€18.9bn) in committed capital.The combined platform will operate as Churchill.Ken Kencel, president and chief executive officer of Churchill, said the combination of the two businesses “creates one of the largest, most differentiated middle market private capital investment platforms” in the US.The combined platform manages more than 250 portfolio investments and has more than 150 limited partner investments in middle market private equity funds. Collectively, the combined businesses invest more than $5bn annually in over 100 middle market companies, led by highly experienced investment teams. The new platform will provide customised financing solutions across the capital structure including first lien, unitranche, second lien and mezzanine debt and equity co-investments, in addition to private equity fund investments.DWS takes AI stake via ArabesqueDWS Group has acquired a minority stake of 24.9% in Arabesque AI, asset manager Arabesque’s artificial intelligence company. The companies also agreed on a strategic partnership to enhance the capabilities of the AI engine, and to develop sophisticated AI-based investment solutions. Both parties have agreed to establish an expert working group for ongoing collaboration.They said that as part of the cooperation they intend to work exclusively on new projects together.Asoka Woehrmann, CEO of DWS, said: “The strategic partnership with Arabesque AI is the next step towards the digitalisation of DWS. It will clearly strengthen our digital capabilities and, in particular, our artificial intelligence know-how.”“[I]n the future, the AI engine will deliver innovative signals that will help us identify additional alpha sources, and will enable us to make smarter decisions,” he said.The firms said they had agreed to maintain confidentiality on the price of the transaction and further financial details. The transaction has already closed. Last year DWS took in a minority stake in Arabesque S-Ray GmbH, an ESG data provider, and entered into a strategic partnership for the development of new ESG data products and services.“With this suite of investments, DWS is following through in strengthening its ESG and digital capabilities, as announced at last year’s annual general meeting,” the German asset manager said.last_img read more

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HydraWell picks up long-term P&A deal in Norway

first_imgHydraWell has ben awarded a contract by a Norwegian entity of an undisclosed oil company for plug and abandonment and slot recovery operations on a major field on the Norwegian continental shelf.HydraWell said on Friday that the contract was valid for five years plus three additional three-year options. The contract value has not been disclosed.The operator will utilize HydraWell’s HydraHemera second generation high-pressure Perf, Wash & Cement (PWC) jetting system as their chosen technical solution for both P&A and slot recovery operations.According to the company, the PWC technology plugs offshore wells in 2-3 days, compared to traditional section milling operations which often takes 10-14 days to complete.Mark Sørheim, CEO of HydraWell, said: “This operator knows us and our technology well. It is an innovative player dedicated to driving down costs for plugging operations. To be able to partner with them over the next five years and beyond will further deliver cost efficiencies to all stakeholders, including the Norwegian Tax Payers.”HydraWell added that it would manage the contract out of its headquarters in Stavanger, Norway.In recent company news, Spanish oil company Repsol awarded a frame agreement to HydraWell for the provision of technology and services for the operator’s plug and abandonment work on the NCS.last_img read more

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Abortion rate drops to lowest in 25 years

first_imgNZ Herald 19 June 2017Family First Comment: Family First NZ spokeswoman Marina Young said she was one of those who had had an abortion and had come to regret it. She wanted the Government to provide “complete information” about abortion-related risks and independent pregnancy counselling so women can make a decision with certainty and knowledge. “I am one of those women, a statistic, who had an abortion and was deeply affected both emotionally and physically and I know I am not alone as I have come across many who have experienced the same, who’s stories are yet to be heard.” http://www.chooselife.org.nzAbortions have dropped to the lowest rate in over 25 years.The general abortion rate – abortions per 1000 women aged 15-44 – was 13.5 per 1000 women in 2016, down from 14.2 in 2015.Statistics NZ reported that the abortion rates for younger women have fallen significantly in recent years whereas the rate has stayed the same for older women.Women aged 20-24 have more abortions than any other age group, accounting for about 28 per cent of abortions in 2016.Family First NZ spokeswoman Marina Young said she was one of those who had had an abortion and had come to regret it. She wanted the Government to provide “complete information” about abortion-related risks and independent pregnancy counselling so women can make a decision with certainty and knowledge.“I am one of those women, a statistic, who had an abortion and was deeply affected both emotionally and physically and I know I am not alone as I have come across many who have experienced the same, who’s stories are yet to be heard.”READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11879064last_img read more

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