Cardi B Apologizes for Appropriating Hindu Culture on Magazine Cover

first_imgCardi B Apologizes for Appropriating Hindu Culture on Magazine CoverCardi B. Broadimage/ShutterstockShe’s sorry. Cardi B may be able to clapback when she’s unnecessarily criticized, but she also knows when to admit she’s wrong.Earlier this week, the 28-year-old appeared on the cover of the November issue of Footwear News to promote her latest collection with Reebok. Photographed portraying the Hindu goddess Durga, she quickly received backlash for cultural appropriation.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “And though it was dope, if people think I’m offending their culture or their religion I want to say I’m sorry,” the Grammy winner said. “That was not my intent. I do not like disrespecting nobody’s religion. I wouldn’t like people to offend my religion.”She continued, “I wasn’t trying to be disrespectful; maybe I should have done my research. I’m sorry, I can’t change the past, but I will do more research for the future.”Along with the “I Like It” singer, the publication also issued an apology.- Advertisement – “People are saying Cardi B is paying homage to our Hindu goddess Durga,” one Twitter user wrote. “So as a Hindu I want to say that: 1-Wearing a shoe in a temple is prohibited 2-Durga maa is not to be used as an aesthetic 3- Durga maa is NEVER depicted bare bodied 4-THIS. IS. NOT. HOMAGE. IT’S. DISRESPECT.”The “WAP” rapper took to Instagram on Tuesday, November 10, to publicly apologize. “Sorry guys. I didn’t mean to offend or disrespect anybody’s culture,” she captioned an Instagram Story video. “I can’t change the [past] but I’ll be more cautious in the future.”In the clip, she explained that the creatives on the cover shoot told her she was going to portray a Goddess that represents “strength, femininity and liberation, and that’s something I love and I’m all about.” However, she understands where her fault lies.- Advertisement – “Yesterday we posted content from our exclusive Cardi B cover shoot,” a statement to Us Weekly read. “One of the images was intended to pay homage to Hindu goddess Durga, and our intent was to show a powerful woman. However, we realize we were not considerate of certain cultural and religious perspectives and how this could be perceived as deeply offensive.It continued, “We take full accountability for this oversight and we apologize, it is important we learn from this example and are sensitive to this sort of religious imagery when creative discussions are taking place in the future. Today, we’re releasing another cover from the shoot that was a subscriber exclusive.”Listen on Spotify to Get Tressed With Us to get the details of every hair love affair in Hollywood, from the hits and misses on the red carpet to your favorite celebrities’ street style ‘dos (and don’ts!)last_img read more

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Proposed Draconian Law on Associations in Egypt Further Threatens Civil Society

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 Shares karlstury / Shutterstock.comJuly 14, 2014; Human Rights WatchAccording to Human Rights Watch:“Egypt is obliged to respect and ensure the right to freedom of association, set out in article 22 of the ICCPR and article 10 of the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights. Egypt may only limit this right through regulations ‘prescribed by law and that are necessary in a democratic society.’ Any limitation should respond to a pressing public need and reflect basic democratic values of pluralism and tolerance. ‘Necessary’ restrictions must also be proportionate—that is, carefully balanced against the specific reason for imposing the restriction and not discriminatory, including on the grounds of national origin, political opinion, or belief.”Despite those guarantees, Human Rights Watch warns about a draft law on associations now being circulated among that country’s nongovernmental organizations. The law would “give the government and security agencies veto power over all activities of associations in Egypt” thus negating Egyptians’ right to freedom of association guaranteed by the Egyptian constitution and international law. The draft law “would make all activities of associations, including any decisions made by the board, subject to government veto. The government and security agencies would be allowed to investigate the premises of any association and restrict foreign funding and cooperation with groups abroad. They would also be able to disband already exiting groups, pending a court order, and deny a license to newer groups if it decided their activities could ‘threaten national unity.’”Human Rights Watch writes that the law would require “international organizations to obtain permission in advance from an Egyptian government committee containing Interior Ministry and intelligence service representatives before carrying out any activity in Egypt. The committee would be able to rescind that permission at any time, for any reason.”“This law is not about regulating nongovernmental organizations—it’s about throttling them and robbing them of their independence,” said Joe Stork, deputy Middle East and North Africa director of Human Rights Watch. “These provisions would extinguish a crucial element of democracy in Egypt.” The draft law will either be introduced in the country’s next parliament, or it could be promulgated by presidential decree, as occurred last November with a highly restrictive law on assembly. One activist comments, “Our time is coming…There will be a crackdown on NGOs, and we all expect to end up in prison soon. We know this is our fate, and we have accepted it.”—Ruth McCambridgeShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

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