When is the Champions League group stage draw, and how can I follow it?

first_img highlights Getty 1 smart causal Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur supporters are eagerly awaiting their Champions League fate.The 2018/19 competition is ready to start in earnest, with the draw set to sort the 32 teams into their groups. Holders Real Madrid go into Pot 1 Best clips, calls and talkSPORT moments of 2019, feat Hearn, McCoist and more FOOTBALL LATEST Tottenham v Brighton LIVE: talkSPORT commentary and team news for Boxing Day opener impact When is the Champions League group stage draw?This year’s group stage draw takes place on Thursday, August 30.Live from the Grimaldi Forum in Monaco, things get under way at 5pm.The 32 teams will be split into four pots, with a team picked from each in turn.This will create eight groups, consisting of a team from each seeded pot.Manchester City are in Pot 1, Spurs and Manchester United in Pot 2, with Liverpool in Pot 3.Is it on talkSPORT?We will be covering the big draw right here on talkSPORT2 from 4pm.Tune in using your DAB radio or our online player.How can I watch it?The draw will be streamed live on Uefa’s official website.To watch on TV, head to BT Sport 2 where coverage will start at 4.30pm. How the Premier League table could change after the Boxing Day fixtures possible standings gameday Every current Premier League club’s best kit from the past decade silverware Every Championship club’s best signing of the decade, including Taarabt and Dack England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won Who is in the draw?Pot 1Real Madrid (holders)Atletico Madrid (UEFA Europa League winners)BarcelonaBayern MunichManchester CityJuventusParis Saint-GermainLokomotiv MoscowPot 2Borussia DortmundPortoManchester UnitedShakhtar DonetskNapoliTottenham HotspurRomaPot 3LiverpoolSchalkeLyonMonacoAjaxCSKA MoscowPSV EindhovenValenciaPot 4Viktoria PlzenClub BruggeGalatasarayYoung BoysInter MilanHoffenheimAEK AthenHoffenheimCrvena zvezdaAEK Athenslast_img read more

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Early Platypus Stuns Evolutionists

first_imgWith the possible exception of a monotreme tooth assumed to be 62 million years old, the oldest known platypus fossil was dated 15 million years old.  Now, a fossil from Australia reported in Science sets a new record: 112 million years old.1    “It’s really, really old for a monotreme,” Timothy Rowe of the University of Texas (UT), Austin, told the audience at a meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology last month in Austin, Texas.  How to fit this with the evolution of monotremes?That would push back the fossil record of the platypus quite a bit; the next youngest fossil is Obdurodon dicksoni from 15-million-year-old rocks in Australia.  It is also much older than current estimates from DNA of when platypuses and echidnas diverged from their most recent common ancestor.  Molecular clocks put that date somewhere between 17 million and 80 million years ago.  Rowe speculated that one reason for the underestimate may be that monotremes evolve at slower rates than other mammals do, an idea that fits with their lower diversity.1.  Erik Stokstad, “Jaw Shows Platypus Goes Way Back,” Science, 23 November 2007: Vol. 318. no. 5854, p. 1237, DOI: 10.1126/science.318.5854.1237a.Was this platypus a transitional form?  No.  Was it evolving from a simpler animal into a complex creature with a duck bill, poison spur, electrical sensing organ, webbed feet, fur and ability to lay eggs?  No – it was Darwin’s nightmare popping up way, way back in the record, over 100 million years earlier (in their own dating scheme) than the next clear platypus fossil.  Why not consider the obvious, that there was never any 113 million years between the two fossils?    According to evolutionary theory, most of the other mammals diversified into elephants, giraffes, lions and whales in far less time, but these Darwin-defying furry-duckmammals just lived on and on in their niche as if nothing else was going on in the world.  Rowe’s reply that they just evolved slower (and that lower diversity demonstrates this), should be seen not only as a gratuitous speculation, but as an escape from reality.    That’s it: Darwin was the prophet of Second Life, a virtual world where any fantasy you want to dream up can come true and be called science.  Whenever their virtual fantasyland has an internal conflict, they can always dream up virtual ways to resolve it.  Science needs to kick the habit and get back to the real world – literally, not virtually.(Visited 34 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Weird Evolution Tales

first_imgEvolutionary theory leads to some fantastic tales.  Since evolution is often presumed to be a fact that explains everything in biology, and is itself not subject to testing or doubt, everything in biology must be viewed through an evolutionary lens.  This hard-core stance on evolution often leads to assertions and explanations that appear contrived, if not preposterous, to Darwin doubters.  Here are some recent examples of weird evolution stories that made it past the logic inspectors simply because evolution is unquestioned. 1. The incredible shrinking brain:  On the BBC News, readers were told, “Old age…has evolved to help meet the demands of raising smarter babies.”  As if to pre-empt puzzled looks and questions by some readers, the article added, “And it is not such a stretch, Dr [Chet] Sherwood [George Washington U] suggests, to conclude that grandparents’ extended lives are in an evolutionary sense there to relieve mothers from being solely responsible for raising their big-brained, energetically costly infants.”  The Scientist also bought this idea uncritically. 2. The early brain gets the IQ:  Live Science told its readers, “It took at least 3.5 billion years for intelligent life to evolve on Earth, and the only reason we’re able to contemplate the likelihood of life today is that its evolution happened to get started early.” 3. The arctic brain gets the eye size:  Judith Burns at the BBC News told readers, “Dark winters ‘led to bigger human brains and eyeballs’.”  A team publishing in the Royal Society Biology Letters “found a positive relationship between absolute latitude and both eye socket size and cranial capacity.”  But don’t think that means Eskimos make better philosophers: “The Oxford University team said bigger brains did not make people smarter.”  It just means the bigger eyes need more visual neurons; “It’s just they need bigger eyes and brains to be able to see well where they live.”  Wasn’t cranial capacity, though, the sine qua non of human evolution?  “The work indicates that humans are subject to the same evolutionary trends that give relatively large eyes to birds that sing first during the dawn chorus, or species such as owls that forage at night.”   Astonishing as it may seem, these adaptations occurred rapidly in the tens of thousands of years since humans first migrated into the arctic; Robin Dunbar commented, “they seem to have adapted their visual systems surprisingly rapidly to the cloudy skies, dull weather and long winters we experience at these latitudes.” New Scientist and the BBC News gave this theory a wink and an approving smile.  But did the big-eyed people evolve a resistance to snow blindness?  4. From hydrogen to charity:  You only give to charities across the world because evolution figured out it’s less costly to be nice to every person you meet, even if you will never see them, than to risk offending someone you might see again.  This is the gist of a story on PhysOrg about how generosity evolved.  Tooby and Cosmides had to fit this into evolution because, obviously, “one of the outstanding problems in the behavioral sciences was why natural selection had not weeded out this pleasing but apparently self-handicapping behavioral tendency” to be nice to strangers; “If traditional theories in these fields are true, such behaviors should have been weeded out long ago by evolution or by self-interest,” the article noticed. 5. How irreducibly complex blood clotting evolved:  The blood clotting cascade was one of the prime examples of irreducible complexity that Michael Behe used in his intelligent-design treatise, Darwin’s Black Box.  PhysOrg, by contrast, contends that “Evolution provides clue to blood clotting.”  One of the many proteins involved in clotting, called VWF, is essential.  J. Evan Sadler was aware that “The challenge for the cell is how to build this massive protein without clogging the machinery,” so he “looked to evolution” for “evolutionary clues” about its origin.  He found similarities in key amino acids across species, and then found what happens when he mutated them: they cease functioning.  How this answered Behe’s argument or showed evolution instead of design was not clarified. 6. Bifocal fish:  Some fish in mangrove swamps need to see above and below the water surface simultaneously.  They have eyes adapted to this need, with parts of the retina sensing light coming from below water sensitive to yellows, and parts sensing light above water more sensitive to blues.  According to PhysOrg, a study at University of British Columbia attributed this adaptation to new functions emerging out of duplicated genes: it “illuminates how gene duplication can lead to innovation – in this case each half of the eye gets its own duplicate, tailored to its particular needs,” was the conclusion.  How this represents mutation or innovation instead of tuning existing function was not illuminated. 7. Convergent butterflies:  According to PhysOrg, “Butterfly study sheds light on convergent evolution.”  But the study by UC Irvine on how similar red patterns can be found on unrelated butterflies does not so much confirm convergent evolution  (a term invented after the fact to explain common features that defy evolutionary theory), as much as to describe how innate genetic mechanisms (primarily gene expression) allow for common variations within common environments.  The butterflies are still butterflies.  The authors did not attempt to explain metamorphosis by evolution (see 07/26/2011).  Robert Reed, evolutionary biologist at UC Irvine, said “Out of the tens of thousands in a typical genome, it seems that only a handful tend to drive major evolutionary change over and over again.”  Those must be super-powerful genes.  Reed had more to say about that:  “Biologists have been asking themselves, ‘Are there really so few genes that govern evolution?’” Reed said. “This is a beautiful example of how a single gene can control the evolution of complex patterns in nature. Now we want to understand why: What is it about this one gene in particular that makes it so good at driving rapid evolution?”  Another evolutionist quoted by Science Daily was ecstatic: “Now this group has discovered that a single gene underlies one of the most spectacular evolutionary radiations in nature! Perhaps the genetic basis for diversity will turn out to be far more simple than we expected.”  Reducing evolution to single genes, though, puts more creative responsibility on them, and raises new questions: how did a gene with such enormous innovative potential evolve in the first place? 8. Of panda thumbs and mole investments:  Like pandas, moles have extra “thumbs” that grow out of the sesamoid bone.  The BBC News announced, “Mystery of mole’s second thumb solved.”  Live Science merely claimed that the adaptation helps the animal, but then offered a composite explanation (including Lamarckism) for why other mole species don’t have the extra appendage: they “never developed the need to tunnel underground to the same extent, so never fully developed the outer thumb, or environmental changes no longer required them to develop it, so they stopped investing extra energy into growing them, the researchers say.”  Jennifer Carpenter at the BBC News, though, was sure Darwin should take the credit for the five-finger salute, when other numbers of digits are possible: “But evolution seems to have favoured the five-fingered.” 9. On sex in insects:  A butterfly was found with both male and female traits [Earthweek].  Some ant species are sexual, some are asexual.   Is there a law of nature that explains these differences?  The Scientist honored a paper on this as a “tour de force of both field work and lab work” because it can “offer insight into a long standing question in evolutionary biology about what forces cause species to choose sex over asexual reproduction and vice versa,” according to an evolutionary biologist.   The idea is that asexuality should be favored by evolution because it is less costly.  When looking at lineages of ants, though, the evolutionary explanation becomes more convoluted: “Tracking differences in other, slowly mutating genes to retrace the evolutionary history of the ants, the team confirmed that the common ancestor of the group probably reproduced sexually, and that asexuality had evolved multiple times independently.”  How can we check out this idea?  “If you come back in 5 million or 10 million years, there’s a good chance the asexual lineages go extinct, but the sexual lineages are still existing.”  Any volunteers? 10. Evolutionists promote junk DNA to chief evolver:  Bold type tells readers of PhysOrg, “Scientists present evidence for groundbreaking evolution theory,” as if Darwin didn’t break enough ground.  “The popular belief among scientists that certain sequences of DNA are relatively unimportant in the evolutionary process has been turned on its head by two Murdoch University researchers.”  The dramatic proposal by Oliver and Greene is that “jumping genes are actually driving the evolutionary process in some species.”  So sure are they that differences between apes and humans can be explained by this idea, “it’s very hard to see how primates and humans could have evolved in the way they have, without the intervention of jumping genes.”  It appeared necessary to rescue standard evolution theory from the evidence, so Oliver and Greene “further developed their theory into four modes that help shed light on why evolution sometimes occurs in fits and starts, sometimes gradually and sometimes hardly at all. Therefore, their jumping gene theory helps to explain a number of mysteries in biology, including why species suddenly appear in the fossil record, why some groups of organisms are species-rich and others are species-poor.”  But can jumping genes generate a trilobite all at once?  Not only that, they can solve multiple creationist arguments in a single blow: “Lineages with active jumping genes or large uniform populations of them spawn new species readily because they possess a greater ability to evolve, diversify and survive. An example of this is bats,” said Mr Oliver. “But species which are deficient in jumping genes or with inactive jumping genes tend to risk extinction because they lack the capacity to adapt, change and diversify. The so-called ‘living fossils’ like the fish coelacanth and the reptile tuatara are good examples. “It also helps to explain why some species change little over millions of years like these living fossils. And why almost all species do not eliminate this junk DNA from their genomes.” 11. Origin of cancer species: A new view of cancer is evolving in evolutionary minds: that it represents a new parasitic species. PhysOrg advertised the position by Peter Duesberg at UC Berkeley: “Duesberg and UC Berkeley colleagues describe their theory that carcinogenesis – the generation of cancer – is just another form of speciation, the evolution of new species.”  The ghost of Julian Huxley got a cameo appearance on stage. 12. Lego evolution: If individual mutations present a problem for evolutionary theory, maybe more is better.  PhysOrg presented a view of “modular evolution” that allows Darwin to assemble innovations with pluggable parts.  “Evolution seems to use the existing signaling pathways almost like a modular construction system,” the article explained, describing the work of Xiaoyue Wang on roundworms.  He sees cancer as a useful Lego block: “ don’t believe that what we have discovered in our study of nematodes is an unusual exception,” Wang said.  “Similar processes are known to lead to cancer development in humans. But likewise, they can initiate changes that can become subject to natural selection and eventually be propagated in the course of evolution.’” In each of these articles, evolution was taken for granted as the catch-all explanation for anything and everything.  No Darwin skeptics were quoted to challenge the evolutionary stories.  For an encore, consider an entry on Wired News (or should that be Weird?) that “Larger Brains May Have Evolved Due to Sports, Not Smarts.”  Such a claim contradicts 150 years of evolutionary claims about the origin of human intelligence.  The study compared brain sizes across species and correlated it with prowess in physical abilities.  “While their data seemed to hold true for many mammals, it seemed to break down once humans were thrown into the mix,” reporter Brian Mossop admitted, indicating that data to support his headline was futureware: “In other words, comparing humans to other non-primate species may be skipping too many evolutionary steps, so Raichlen said his team are [sic] changing their strategy for the future, to see whether these evolutionary connections are still at work within humans.”  To top it off, they could not provide a mechanism that would explain it: “Our paper makes some suggestions about how this might work on an evolutionary time scale,” [David] Raichlen [U of Arizona] said, “but I think there’s still a ton of work to do to figure out the mechanisms.” Paradigms can be stifling things.  They prevent scientists from thinking outside the box. One can imagine a creationist paradigm ruling biology that might similarly stifle thinking outside its box.  The solution is not boxes, but open doors.  Open the doors and windows and let the fresh air of lively debate enter.  Evolutionists and creationists need each other to avoid intellectual laziness.  Even a true position is sharpened by challenge, so long as the challenge is evidence-based and honest.  The Darwin box is a cylindrical echo chamber, with no openings for non-evolutionary paradigms – not even vent holes.  The inhabitants don’t notice the increasing stench inside, because they have gotten used to it.  Evolutionists seeking understanding in this arena are like the proverbial moron placed into a round room, told there is a penny in the corner.  Ever learning and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth, they pride themselves on the energy spent in their endless quest. Until academia opens its doors to serious challenge from outside its Darwin lockbox, journals and reporters will continue to give scientific explanation the runaround with circular arguments, taking victory laps in a stadium with no contest.(Visited 94 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Pandora Remixes Its Free Listening Limits

first_imgTags:#streaming music Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts Faced with ever-rising music licensing fees, music streaming service Pandora has implemented a 40-hour per month limit on free mobile listening – a small change that has large implications on the state of music delivery services.The reason for the listening cap, according to Pandora cofounder Tim Westergren, is due to the increase in per-track royalty fees, which “have increased more than 25% over the last 3 years, including 9% in 2013 alone and are scheduled to increase an additional 16% over the next two years.”Westergren’s blog entry detailing the new policy was succinct and to the point. Emphasizing that this change would only effect less than 4% of Pandora’s monthly listeners, Westergren also took the opportunity to point out that computer users would be unaffected by the change, and that listeners were more than welcome to sign up for Pandora’s paid subscription services.Investors took note of the announcement too, with Pandora’s stock down as much as 6.5% percent just prior market opening this morning. (Though that dip was shallowing out to less than 1% by the time this story went to press.) The listening cap, and Westergren’s alternatives have revealed the continuing weak spot for online services: generating revenue on mobile platforms.Blame Mobile, AgainThe reason Pandora can continue offering free, unlimited and ad-supported music on computers is simple: there’s enough ad space shoved at free listeners’ eyeballs that will, along with the audio ads, cover the costs of those royalty fees. But on mobile, audio ads are about all Pandora can put in front of their listeners. You could increase the frequency of ads, of course, but that would likely lead to less listeners than more paid listeners.Cracking the mobile puzzle is very much an enigma for online services, because the form factor and use of many mobile devices preclude the type of ad displays and other revenue generators that worked on PC platforms. It is especially difficult for music services that, unlike social media services that have their content created by the very users they serve, have to come up with fixed licensing costs to broadcast music tracks.(See also Could Music Licensing Costs Kill Pandora? Last.fm’s Troubles Are A Warning Sign)While Pandora may take a bit of hit from this move, a smart trimming move like this should help weigh in costs and not irk users too much. Other services may see some migration from Pandora in the near-term, but those services are likely to be in the same boat and may have to implement similar moves of their own.Music is expensive and mobile is a revenue suck. This combination is a bad playlist for companies like Pandora, until they can figure out a better mix.center_img brian proffitt A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Centre’s interlocutor in J&K holds talks with Omar Abdullah

first_imgReigniting hopes of a political reach-out in Kashmir, the Centre’s interlocutor, Dineshwar Sharma, on Wednesday said he “is willing to meet whoever wanted to meet him” after he met former Chief Minister and National Conference vice-president Omar Abdullah in Srinagar. Speaking to The Hindu after the meeting, Mr. Sharma said he met Mr. Abdullah as his mandate was to meet all kinds of people, not just politicians, in Jammu and Kashmir. “I keep meeting so many people. I met the Governor recently and non-political figures. My job is to meet everybody,” he said. He met Mr. Abdullah at his residence in Srinagar on Wednesday morning. Sources said the “NC leader insisted on an early installation of an elected government in the State”. This is Mr. Sharma’s second significant meeting since July 16 when he met Governor Satya Pal Malik and apprised him of “his consultations with people from a cross section of society in the State.” The meeting was followed by the Governor welcoming Hurriyat chairman Mirwaiz Umar Farooq’s offer for a dialogue, which was immediately opposed by the top BJP leadership including the party general secretary Ram Madhav. Hardening his stand, Mr. Sharma also said that “nobody has the authority to question the Constitution”, in response to a question on any immediate engagement with the Hurriyat, which stands for a dialogue outside the Constitution. He, however, was quick to add: “I will meet whoever wants to meet me.”last_img read more

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PH archers miss shot at third medal

first_imgPH bets Paul Marton Dela Cruz and Amaya Cojuangco during the semifinals of Mixed Team Compound archery in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games. INQUIRER/ MARIANNE BERMUDEZKUALA LUMPUR — The Philippines narrowly missed a medal in archery mixed compound after back-to-back jolting match-play defeats Friday at Synthetic Turf Field inside KL Sports City.Paul Marton Dela Cruz and Amaya Paz-Cojuangco handily made it to the semifinals after a 156-150 win over Laos in the eliminations.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES That heightened expectations of another medal from the sport that already brought two bronzes the previous days but the Filipino archers fell short this time.“We didn’t make it. It’s not our day. They shot way better than us today,” said the 30-year-old Dela Cruz who bagged the individual bronze and shared another with men’s team.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingLeading in the opening end, Dela Cruz and Cojuangco witnessed a steely-nerved Myanmar pair finishing them off in the suspense-filled shoot out. They finished the six ends tied at 154.Stunned, the Philippines thus fell into bronze medal match-up facing Vietnam, which prevailed, 159-155. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ MOST READ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Paz-Cojuangco, who was four-time champion here, could not contain her emotions after that heart breaking losses and had to excuse herself at the back of the field.The Philippines still has golden chances in recurve which will begin on Aug. 21.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Navarro heats up late, lifts San Sebastian past EAC Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul View commentslast_img read more

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10 months agoRoma president Pallotta admits no holds barred Monchi meeting

first_imgRoma president Pallotta admits no holds barred Monchi meetingby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAS Roma president James Pallotta admits he’s had a no holds barred meeting in Boston with sports director Monchi.Roma are currently struggling in seventh position.“We had a very productive three days together in Boston discussing both the football and business activities of the club,” said Pallotta.“It goes without saying that no one at the club is happy with the results and performances so far this season and we had an open and honest conversation about issues that we need to address and improve as a matter of urgency to get our season back on track.“There was a lot of straight talking and everything was put on the table. Our only goal now is to do better in everything we do and we will work on that together – from me, our board, our management team, Monchi, Di Francesco, our football operations staff, the players and all the staff.“Together we haven’t met the very high expectations we have set for ourselves – and have tried to deliver on in recent seasons – and that must improve. Together we are working to address that.“If anyone at the club is not committed to being part of a team effort, there’s no place for them here.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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a day ago​Arsenal hero Petit: Nothing has changed since Wenger left

first_img​Arsenal hero Petit: Nothing has changed since Wenger leftby Freddie Taylora day agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal legend Emmanuel Petit does not see any differences between the end of Arsene Wenger’s time at the club and their performances now.Unai Emery has received time and backing at the club, as he is now into his second season as manager.But their performances and results are no better than what Wenger was achieving, and Emery arguably has a more balanced squad at his disposal.Petit told reporters: “I can understand why many Arsenal supporters are losing patience with Unai Emery.”As a manager he has a bad record away from home – not just with Arsenal, but also while he was in Spain.”Arsenal showed no character and it p***es me off because it has been the case so many times away from home.”The starting XI he picked against Sheffield United was strange.”It’s difficult after an international break when you have to play teams that don’t have as many players involved in the international fixtures.”But you know what to expect when you go to Bramall Lane – you know the qualities of the Sheffield United team.”They fight, especially in front of their home crowd, and they get balls into the box and put pressure on at set pieces.”That’s what they did against Liverpool and Chelsea.”But more importantly they didn’t show any technical quality on the pitch.”They gave away so many simple balls and had no inspiration, imagination or creativity.”They looked so heavy. This isn’t Arsenal – you need to take the ball and show what you’ve got.”But I haven’t seen that in years. Nothing has changed since Arsène Wenger left.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Gabrielles Angel Foundation Hosted The Angel Ball Launch Party 2016

first_imgDenise Rich and Gabrielle’s Angel Foundation for Cancer Research celebrated the generous support of the foundation through its Angel Ball Launch Party 2016 at TAO Downtown on Thursday, October 6th, 2016.Guests toasted the Gabrielle’s Angel Foundation with cocktails by Manhattan Moonshine, the world’s first premium silver whiskey. Manhattan Moonshine served up its signature Earl Grey Sour cocktail, which is a delicious Whiskey Sour infused with Earl Grey tea. Due to its naturally sweet, grain forward flavor, Manhattan Moonshine makes the perfect whiskey for cocktails. Founder and CEO William Kehler was on site to serve up these delicious cocktails. Sufi Wines also served guests its perfectly balanced red and white wines.Attendees included: Denise Rich, Will Kehler, Lauren Day Roberts, Amrita Singh, Sam Bhatia, Michelle Herbert, Paola Bacchini-Rosenshein, Alisa Roever, Cynthia Ott, Jasper Ott, Morris Moinian, Michelle Rella, Frank Rella, Tatiana Byron Marx and Brad Marx.For more information and tickets to the Angel Ball 2016 on Monday, November 21st, 2016 at Cipriani Wall Street, please visit www.gabriellesangels.org.last_img read more

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Images of Hurricane Ottos Thursday impact

first_img Facebook Comments AFP PHOTO / NOAA-NASA GOES Project Inti Ocon/AFP Related posts:PHOTOS: Hurricane Otto begins path of destruction through Central America A small town unites to help Hurricane Otto victims – the Costa Rican way UPDATE: Evacuations ordered as tropical storm Otto becomes hurricane Otto becomes a Category 2 hurricane, approaches Caribbean coast (Via MSP) Hurricane Otto made landfall in Costa Rica at approximately 3:30 pm Wednesday; the eye of the hurricane is moving into the Pacific as of this writing on Thursday evening, where it has been downgraded from a Category 2 to Category 1 storm. Initial impact includes fallen trees, power outages and infrastructure damage, as well as the displacement of thousands. Here are a few initial images from the hurricane’s path across southern Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica on Wednesday.Read our complete coverage here and stay tuned for updates Friday morning. Ezequiel Becerra/AFP Inti Ocon/AFP Inti Ocon/AFPlast_img read more

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