Ralph Hasenhuttl says Southampton rise is ‘scary but not surprising’ | Football News

first_img“The first 15 minutes was probably our worst spell after half-time. We couldn’t get out. We kept giving the ball back to them and when you’re in that situation it becomes difficult for. Congratulations to Southampton on the night. They were far better than us and we couldn’t cope with them.“We go up and down too quick. That’s one thing we have to resolve. We go along nicely then all of a sudden we don’t play well enough in the game. It nags me.”What’s next?Southampton travel to face Wolves on Saturday November 21 after the international break; kick-off 3pm.Newcastle will host Chelsea at St James’ Park at 12.30pm on the same day. Ralph Hasenhuttl heaped praise on his players after Southampton moved top of the Premier League, but admits his side’s rise has not come as a surprise to him.Saints moved top of the Premier League for the first time in their history after beating Newcastle 2-0 at St Mary’s on Friday night. A seventh-minute strike from Che Adams gave the home side an early lead and they wrapped up victory in the 82nd minute through Stuart Armstrong.- Advertisement – Jamie Redknapp and Alan Pardew felt that Newcastle captain Jamaal Lascelles was lucky to avoid conceding a penalty after a reckless tackle on Southampton’s Theo Walcott. Inconsistency frustrates Bruce – Advertisement – 1:14 Newcastle, who had yet to be beaten away from home in the Premier League this season and headed into the game on the south coast in good form, having beaten Everton 2-1 in their previous fixture, but often lacked control and managed just four shots during the game.“Certainly, the best team won,” Newcastle boss Steve Bruce told Sky Sports. “We didn’t get anywhere near where we were five days ago. We didn’t look after the ball well enough and we gifted them two goals. We didn’t do enough to win the game. We didn’t handle the full press and it was a difficult night.“The one thing you can’t do at this level is give them the goals we did. We gave the ball away far too often. We knew what to expect from them – the full press – and unfortunately we couldn’t play through it. Che Adams rattles in Theo Walcott's cross to put Saints in frontImage:Che Adams rattles in Theo Walcott’s cross to put Saints in front A year ago, Southampton sat in the bottom three of the Premier League, but the Austrian believes his side are now showing their development and the fruits of their investment both away from the pitch and on the training ground, away from the pressure of playing in front of supporters. 3:03 FREE TO WATCH: Highlights from Southampton’s win over Newcastle preview image preview image “It’s amazing what my team does in the moment,” he told Sky Sports. “Congratulations to everybody around the pitch and the team. Amazing. We could maybe have scored more but the rest was perfect. Everybody was on the highest level. It is a little scary what we are doing at the moment to be honest but not surprising when I see what we are working on.“Earlier, we could have closed the game, earlier. That was definitely possible. The way we played through lines was fantastic to watch. We can then make the last pass and final decision even better but this is criticism on a high level. We know it’s not so easy to create a lot of chances against these teams.- Advertisement – Hasenhuttl’s men dominated possession and chances as they sealed a comfortable win that saw them replace Liverpool at the top of the table ahead of this weekend’s fixtures.The Saints last stood at the summit of English football 32 years ago under the management of Chris Nicholl and it marks a remarkable 12 months for the Austrian manager since their 9-0 thrashing by Leicester last October. 2:35 Newcastle boss Steve Bruce was very disappointed his side couldn’t follow up their win against Everton with a good performance and admits his side’s biggest problem is consistency after their 2-0 defeat to Southampton in the Premier League. Hasenhuttl added: “I’m happy for the fans that we’re top of the league at the moment, but the season is very long. We have a very intense period over Christmas but the squad is nicely balanced. We’ve restructured a few things and this now shows that the players are stepping up.”“It’s the first time that we’ve had three wins in a row and this was the goal for today. It’s the first time that we’ve taken three points over Newcastle as the last three times we’d lost. We’re top for now, but it’s only for a few moments. Of course, it’s nice for the fans and the players. For me, it’s important that we say hungry and don’t lean back.” Stuart Armstrong sealed the win to put Southampton top of the leagueImage:Stuart Armstrong sealed the win to put Southampton top of the league Ralph Hasenhuttl shakes hands with Adams at the final whistleImage:Ralph Hasenhuttl shakes hands with Adams at the final whistle “We’re a strong side and this is not a coincidence as we’ve developed every part of our game. Our game management has been very brave and I feel it has helped us in some situations where there’s no crowd in the stadium so we can develop our game, as there’s not so much stress now, and we’ve got used to it. As a result, we’ve now got a more complete game.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Sunday feature: The shooting and the legality of it all

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Joseph Lamasters, 42, of Creston, Iowa was not a hardened criminal. His obituary said he was the father of two daughters, a youth softball coach and a member of the Holy Spirit Catholic Church in the small town southwest of Des Moines with 7,834 people — a town probably not much different than Wellington.But for whatever reason, Lamasters had lost his way. He had a series of misdemeanor offenses stemming back since 1989. But on March 2, 2012 he was charged in a major drug bust in Union County, Iowa that was conducted by five drug agencies in the area. He was charged with delivery of methamphetamine, failure to affix a valid drug stamp tax and possession of meth in March 2, 2012.For whatever reason, Lamasters was on the run last week. Sumner County Sheriff Darren Chamber told Sumner Newscow he was on his way to Texas to find work. But his methods of getting there were suspect. He had been in Minnesota and had stolen a car in Indianapolis. And he was on the Kansas Turnpike driving south Monday morning.Lamasters actions were a bit peculiar as he was driving in Sumner County at 11:40 a.m. Monday morning. He had no money on him. Yet when he approached the south Turnpike gate he gave the employee his ID and proceeded south.Chambers speculates that Lamasters must have come to a realization that he was a criminal in a stolen car and had just given the authorities information about himself. He pulled over at mile post 9, abandoned the vehicle and ran on foot into hiding in south rural Sumner County.In the meantime, after the background check did indeed prove Lamasters had a criminal record and a stolen vehicle, the Sumner County Sheriff department proceeded south with three other deputies.The four of them found the abandoned vehicle, and at first assumed Lamasters had run out of gas. This proved later not to be. He just left the vehicle standing and went into hiding.For four hours, the deputies searched the area and found nothing including conducting an air search. During the search, they decided to inform the local people in the area about a possible fugitive on the loose. The tension was thick.But by 3:30 p.m after unsuccessfully pinpointing the fugitive, the Sheriff’s department called off the search and went back to Wellington. What happened 90 minutes later has become a major topic in the county that may not be settled for years to come. The aftermath…Fast forward to Wednesday afternoon, the personal comment blogs on this site were humming, the local coffee shops were full of talk, and the Sumner County Sheriff’s office was besieged with media requests from outlets across the nation.A local farmer had shot and killed Lamasters.The details of the event will forever be debated, but Chambers is adamant that it was an act of self defense and falls within the “Use of Deadly Force” law.“I knew that this was going to become a debate from people on both the left and the right the minute it happened,” Chambers said. “But I’m looking at it strictly from the facts presented before me.”The Kansas State Legislature in 2006 adopted the “Stand Your Guard” law — which states if a person isn’t doing anything illegal and is attacked by someone, that person doesn’t have to first try to run away, but can stay and use reasonable force in self defense.In this case, Chambers said, the farmer did just that.The confrontation began at 5 p.m. that day. The farmer was burning hedgerow when he saw a person fitting the description of the suspect in question. He told Lamasters to stop and wait as he calls the authorities. But instead the fugitive ran and he was running in the general direction of the farmer’s neighbors, who also happened to be close relatives. Chambers said a husband and wife lived there and the husband was at work at the time.It became a 20-minute ordeal. The farmer had lost sight of Lamasters, but he and his 17-year-old son went to the neighbor’s house in hopes of defending the place from possible attack and defend the wife who was home alone. Chambers said the farmer was carrying a Remington bird gun and once there, he and his son, decided to scour the premises. After checking the house and the barn, the two looked into an outer shed. The 17-year-old discovered Lamasters first. He was hiding behind some feed bags. He came out in attack form, screaming profanities and threats of killing them, Chambers said.That’s when the farmer shot him.“Let me ask you this,” Chambers said. “If the farmer was intending to kill the man, would he have brought along his 17-year-old kid?“It wasn’t as if he woke up that morning and said, ‘I think I’ll go shoot someone.’ It quite simply was a case that just happened – unplanned circumstances.”Chambers also decided not to name the farmer publicly.“I think I have had 20 to 30 media requests since Monday, from the AP to the IP to whoever,” Chambers said. “I am not about to give his name out and put him under such media scrutiny. Hell, he already has media people camping outside his house.” The legality…Ultimately, this comes down to a case of what can property owners can legally protect.Shawn DeJarnett, a legal advisor for Sumner Newscow, stated that according to statute, a person has the right to defend himself if he is preventing imminent death or great bodily harm. But a person does not have the right to pursue someone while protecting property.Say, a criminal comes on your land and takes your pickup. If the property owner pursues the criminal and shoots and kills him, then the property owner could be charged with murder, because his life has never been threatened.However, if that criminal comes into the house and puts the property owner in harms way, the property owner has the right to shoot with deadly force as a way to protect him or herself.Kansas was one of six states to adopt such a law. In Florida, the law came to the forefront during a shooting in which George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla. fatally shot Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old.Zimmerman acknowledged pursuing Martin but said he shot only after he was attacked by the teenager. Zimmerman has since been charged with murder in the second degree and the trial is set for this summer.While many circumstances are different, one can argue Monday’s shooting, north of South Haven, has similarities to the one in Florida. One is the alleged pursuing of Lamasters to the relatives home.Charles O’Hara a criminal defense lawyer in Wichita told the Wichita Eagle in an article on March 31, 2012 that the confusion with the “stand your ground” law is it gives people the right to use excessive force in pursuit of a criminal.“They’re acting like the law lets you go hunt someone down and shoot them, and that’s not true,” O’Hara said.Nationally, the recent rate of justifiable homicides by citizens has been fairly steady, climbing about 4 percent annually from 2006 to 2010, according to the FBI stated in the Wichita Eagle. There were 278 such homicides in 2010.center_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (14) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +20 Vote up Vote down dusty · 387 weeks ago I support what the farmer did 100%.To start with who knows what this person would of done to the homeowners if he wasnt found by the farmer,plus with this guys record he was up to no good what so ever.All of the rural people in this area and all around need to keep there eye out and be ready to protect there places because this problem is only going to get worse,way to much drugs in area and theft in rural on the rise.Sad country we live in,just keep locked and loaded and be on your toes! Report Reply 0 replies · active 387 weeks ago +23 Vote up Vote down Guest · 387 weeks ago You will have to define “hardened criminal” to me. Distribution of meth (meth dealer), stolen car and alluding law enforcement sounds “hardened” to me.. Plus it does not matter what his history was, bottom line the farmer was in fear of life and responded accordingly. What was he supposed to do, let the suspect assault him and/or his son? We have the right to protect ourselves. Period. Report Reply 0 replies · active 387 weeks ago +6 Vote up Vote down Girlie · 387 weeks ago Interesting report Cueball. I’m not sure it will change to many peoples mind, but I enjoyed reading the facts of the case. We probably all agree that we wish it nevery happen. I hope good comes from this. Report Reply 1 reply · active 387 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down JustMe · 387 weeks ago You draw similarities between the Zimmerman case, and the local case. If you look at the facts between the two, they are hardly similar. But I support both those that defended themselves in both cases. Report Reply 2 replies · active 387 weeks ago +4 Vote up Vote down Big Buddy · 387 weeks ago Since the farmer was no longer on his property and went looking for him, does that change the circumstances of liabilty???Also there was no mention if the fugitive was armed during the confrontation???? Report Reply 2 replies · active 387 weeks ago +10 Vote up Vote down Stephen brown · 387 weeks ago Its to bad this man lost his life,However, he was on the run.looking to steal a car or truck.looking to steal food, money .He had to have this to get away.This could have went the other way.This farmer has to live with this the rest of his life.He might have saved his loved ones. Some times things happen we can’t understand.I feel for both of the families. Report Reply 0 replies · active 387 weeks ago +7 Vote up Vote down Rural Resident · 387 weeks ago This guy was a criminal, he got what he deserved. This Farmer should be commended for his actions. If anything else he saved the taxpayers alot of money in feeding, housing, and legal expenses that would have been wasted on the CRIMINAL. Every citizen should be well armed at all times. Our law should be like the one in Texas where you are allowed to protect your life AND PROPERTY with deadly force. Why do liberals think that the criminals have a right to other people’s property? Had this guy stayed in Iowa and been a responsible citizen he would be alive today. He chose to be a criminal and got his justice. Report Reply 0 replies · active 387 weeks ago +6 Vote up Vote down anonymous · 387 weeks ago A fugitive is, by declaration, a potentially dangerous individul and himself in danger of getting beaten or whacked. His best bet would have been to stand next to his car on the turnpike with his hands in the air, waiting for the deputies to take him to safety. He did not do this; he made his next fugitive move and a heads-up, law-abiding citizen removed him from the gene pool. That’s how it works. Report Reply 0 replies · active 387 weeks ago +5 Vote up Vote down Charlie · 387 weeks ago I feel bad for both sides. But why did this man leave Iowa? Why did he choose the bad path? Why did he not have money? Why did he have to steal a veh to get to Texas for a job? Was he on probation? Did he leave Iowa illegally? Did his family know where he was? There are so many questions why a respectable person in the community just up and go the wrong way. It is hard to understand and unbelievable for their actions, it’s just not him and it hurts the love ones in his life. I know I had a son who did that and I waited for a knock on the door. But he is doing great and said he never want to be in that dark world again. The farmer has to live with this as well as the son who was 17. I’m sure he was acting on to protect his neighbor. Who knows what could have happened if he didn’t check on his neighbor. Report Reply 0 replies · active 387 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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