Tom Torti named new chamber chief

first_imgLake Champlain Regional Chamber of CommerceAnnounces New President to Replace A. Wayne RobertsTom Torti has been selected by the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber ofCommerce Board of Directors as the new President of the Chamber toreplace A. Wayne Roberts, who will be retiring at the end of the year. “The Board is very pleased to announce that Tom Torti will be the nextPresident of the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce, followinga thorough and national search process, noted Karen Marshall, LCRCCBoard Chair. “Tom’s solid background in leading and managing complexorganizations, and his experience in policy and state governmentoperations, will provide a solid foundation for his leadership of ourorganization. Tom will be a strong voice for the business community andprovide a seamless transition as we begin new chapters for the Chamberwith the retirement of A. Wayne Roberts.” Mr. Torti will remain in his position as Secretary of the Agency ofNatural Resources (ANR) until after the General Election in November of2006. In a statement issued by the Chamber’s Board of Directors, Mr.Torti stated: “I am excited to be the next President of the LakeChamplain Regional Chamber of Commerce. Although Wayne leaves big shoesto fill, he has pointed the organization in the right direction and Iam eager to work with a vibrant, diverse and growing membership as wellas a solid team of highly respected Chamber staff.”Mr. Torti has been the ANR Secretary since January of 2005. He wasappointed by the Governor to this position after having served as theCommissioner of the Department of Buildings and General Services foreight years. Mr. Torti worked under both Democratic and RepublicanAdministrations, an important attribute for the Chamber’s Board whostrive to be non-partisan in their interactions with the GeneralAssembly and the executive branch of state government. John Dwyer, a member of the Chamber’s Executive Search Committeedescribed the national six-month search process as an intensive, butinteresting exercise in which the committee found a wealth of dynamic,highly qualified list of final candidates to choose from.  “It was adifficult choice, in that each of the candidates possessed exemplaryskills and background. However, Mr. Torti’s ability to work with avariety of stakeholders and people, his financial acumen in overseeingmulti-million dollar budgets and his collaborative manner inestablishing a vision for an organization and then seeing it through inhis work at the state level, is exactly what we are looking for in ournext President.”Mr. Torti has an extensive career in state government and has servedthe local community in various ways including the Essex Selectboard andPlanning Commission, Chittenden County Metropolitan PlanningOrganization, Chittenden County Transportation Authority and variousEssex sports leagues. The Lake Champlain Regional Chamberof Commerce is a non-profit organization that seeks to promote andsupport the healthy environment and quality of life that makes the LakeChamplain Region of Vermont the ideal place to live, work and dobusiness. You have received this message because you authorized theLake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce to e-mail you.To change your or your company’s e-mail contact information, pleasecall 863-3489 or e-mail vermont@vermont.org(link sends e-mail). Toreply directly to the sender of this e-mail, please hit “Reply.”last_img read more

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Latin American, Caribbean economies rebound

first_imgBy Dialogo September 15, 2010 The deep recession that mires the United States only rippled through Latin America and the Caribbean in 2009, according to economist Manuel Lasaga in a Miami Herald report. “The region weathered the worldwide economic crisis largely without the inflationary spirals, debt defaults, bank collapses, capital flight and currency devaluations of the past,” said Lasaga, and added that for the most part, the wave wasn’t strong enough to knock anyone down. In the same report, Augusto de la Torre, Chief Economist for Latin America and the Caribbean for the World Bank, said that institutional and policy reforms have helped create an “economic immune system” for the region. After consolidating economic gains that were started in mid-2009, Latin America and the Caribbean are, in fact, experiencing a year of growth as their economies are expected to grow some 5.2 percent, according to the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (CEPAL). When the organization released its 2009-2010 Economic Study, Executive Director of CEPAL Alicia Bárcena announced that regional growth had been higher than expected. The report by Lasaga explained that Latin America thwarted the effect by adopting economic policies that make sense, including cutting deficits, reforming central banks, building up international reserves needed for international purchases and managing to keep inflation relatively low. The gains though, are not the general rule and has obvious winners (Brazil, Peru, Uruguay and Panama, for example), as well as losers (Haiti and Venezuela). Still, said the Miami Herald report, the recession is expected to throw some 12 million more people from the entire region into poverty and cost about 1 million more their jobs. De la Torre added that even if there’s another downturn, the region will still fare better than on days in which any economic imbalance in the U.S. meant a derailment of economies in Latin America and the Caribbean. “It’s almost like the United States and Latin America switched places,” said Lasaga. “This time Latin America is the region with the good economic indicators.”last_img read more

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Transmission won’t stop unless 80 percent of Jakartans stay at home: Epidemiologists

first_imgJakarta, Indonesia’s capital and its COVID-19 epicenter, needs greater popular effort and targeted local containment to stop contagion, experts have said.Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan has extended the city’s large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) until June 4 in an effort to completely stop transmission after studies found that the COVID-19 reproductive ratio in the capital had been dropping since restriction policies were applied in mid-March. The ratio refers to the expected number of people one person with the disease will directly infect in a population susceptible to the disease.A study by researchers from the University of Indonesia’s School of Public Health found that the reproductive ratio in Jakarta had decreased from 4 in mid-March to 1.11 on May 17. “The coronavirus will not go away. But if we can reduce the ratio to less than one, it will spread much slower. We must make greater efforts to achieve that,” said Pandu Riono, a UI epidemiologist who was involved in the study, on Wednesday.Roughly a month before PSBB was enacted on April 10, the city administration closed down schools and public facilities and called on people to stay at home.The restriction policies caused nearly 60 percent of Jakarta’s residents to stay at home, according to the UI team, which analyzed data from Google’s COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports, which tracks changes in the travel behavior of Android users.New cases, however, began rising again during Ramadan as people spent more time outside their homes during the afternoon and evening, the study found. “[COVID-19 transmission] will not stop unless at least 80 percent of the population stays at home,” Pandu said.He found that people’s mobility in certain regions, including in densely populated areas in Petamburan in Central Jakarta and Sunter Agung in North Jakarta, was higher than that of others. Petamburan and North Sunter are the two subdistricts with the most cases in the capital.“The Jakarta administration needs to focus on regions [with poor compliance with the stay-at-home instructions] in the days ahead,” Pandu said.Read also: COVID-19: Jakarta extends PSBB until June 4 as Jokowi seeks to ease restrictionsThe findings concur with a separate study by the Tarumanegara University Center for Metropolitan Studies, which mapped the spatial patterns of the spread of the disease.“We suggest the administration use an emergency response. Areas with the highest number of cases should have different handling procedures,” said Suryono Herlambang, one of the researchers.As of Thursday, Jakarta had reported 6,301 confirmed cases. Sunter Agung had recorded the highest number of cases at 142, followed by Petamburan with 126 cases and West Pademangan in North Jakarta with 117 cases. The other regions of Jakarta have recorded less than 100 cases each.At least 30 confirmed cases in Sunter Agung were linked to members of Islamic missionary movement Jamaat Tabligh who stopped in Al-Muttaqien Mosque in Sunter Agung, North Jakarta, Health Agency head Yudi Dimyati said.A spike of cases also occurred in Sunter Agung’s densely populated community unit (RW) 01, located about 500 meters away from the mosque.To prevent new transmissions, local authorities have isolated the mosque and reduced access to RW 01, Sunter Agung subdistrict head Danang Wijanarko said.In Petamburan, subdistrict head Setiyanto said no new clusters had been recorded after a cluster of 72 infections was found in the dormitories of the Bethel Indonesia School of Theology.As the virus has begun to infect residents of the city’s most densely populated areas, the Jakarta health agency has been conducting rapid antibody tests over the past few weeks to head off new infection clusters.Read also: COVID-19 creeps into Jakarta’s kampungsThe agency’s public health department head Fify Mulyani said it had performed rapid tests on 110,090 people and had collected swabs from 4,135 people who provisionally tested positive for the virus to conduct the more accurate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests.Anies, meanwhile, was aware that there were many people violating PSBB, even after he issued a decree on May 11 that permitted sanctioning violators of PSBB or of the social distancing policy imposed in the capital. The decree stipulates punishments ranging from community service to fines.By Wednesday, the Jakarta Public Order Agency (Satpol PP) had recorded 8,436 PSBB violators – both individuals and businesses. Of the number, 446 businesses were forced to cease operations, 1,564 individuals were ordered to perform community service and 327 individuals and businesses were fined. The combined total of fines has reached nearly Rp 300 million (US$20,378).Anies said the 14 days after the PSBB extension would be a defining moment for the capital in the effort to reduce cases. He urged all Jakartans to avoid going outside their homes, even during the upcoming Idul Fitri holiday, expected to fall on Sunday.“We’ve progressed much in the last two months, but this isn’t over yet. We will not ease [PSBB],” he said. “For those who are not yet staying at home, please join our cause.”Topics :last_img read more

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Police to probe three banks in Maria Lumowa fraud case

first_imgRead also: Maria’s extradition shows up other fugitive failuresShe fled Indonesia just before she was named a suspect by the National Police in 2003, and authorities captured her in July of this year after Serbia granted Indonesia’s extradition request. Awi said the investigators had questioned 14 witnesses and named 16 suspects in the case, including Maria. The other 15 suspects have been found guilty and have served their sentences, Antara reported. (vny)Topics : The National Police’s Criminal Investigation Department (Bareskrim) plans to investigate three banks in connection with a loan scam allegedly orchestrated by recently captured fugitive Maria Pauline Lumowa.Police spokesman Brig. Gen. Awi Setiyono said the move was made to track down the money obtained in the scam. “Investigators will look into three private banks in relation to the money obtained from a fictitious letter of credit,” Awi said Tuesday, as reported by kompas.com.Maria allegedly used a fictitious letter of credit to get US$136 million and 56 million euro in bank loans from Bank Negara Indonesia issued to her company PT Gramarindo Group between 2002 and 2003. The scam was allegedly worth Rp 1.7 trillion. last_img read more

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MN sets sights on manufacturing sector to increase scale

first_imgMN, the €114bn asset manager, is looking to increase its scale by winning over pension funds from the Dutch manufacturing sector as clients.According to its 2015 annual report, it aiming to offer in particular its expertise in fiduciary and asset management.In addition to the €40bn PME and €60bn PMT pension funds, MN also services the €4bn pension fund for the merchant navy (Koopvaardij), as well as seven smaller schemes, including those for Unisys, Cargill, Forbo and Wheels & Tyres.MN, based in The Hague, said it expected to close its Amsterdam office, where it employs approximately 120 staff, this year as part of its drive to reduce costs. Last year, it sold its UK operations to Kempen Capital Management, citing its desire “to refocus on the Dutch market and Dutch clients”.The asset manager reported an operational loss of almost €14m, pointing to the switchover to a new IT system for the administration of income insurance for employers and employees as the main cause.It said it expected to be back in profit this year.In 2014, MN embarked on a four-year process to automate administrative systems and processes almost fully, to achieve a quicker turnover and reduce error margins, while also cutting costs.Last year, it also launched a programme for culture change by improving all processes and departments, focusing on client and their participants.This lead to a reduction of staff in 2016, according the provider, which earlier announced that approximately 220 jobs in its 1,200 strong staff were to disappear.In 2015, MN reduced the executive board from eight to four seats in its drive to improve efficiency.It said it had also developed a climate strategy aimed at the transition from fossil fuels to sustainable energy.MN said the largest challenge for pension funds in the manufacturing industry would be to regain their participants’ trust.René van de Kieft, who succeeded Ruud Hagendijk as chief executive last year, said: “We must jointly explain the strength and the value of our pensions system, as well as our contribution to proper pensions management.”last_img read more

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3 things Fordham said ahead of NCAA Tournament matchup with Syracuse

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 22, 2019 at 6:36 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcCleary Commentscenter_img No. 3 seed Syracuse (24-7, 10-8 Atlantic Coast) will host No. 14 seed Fordham for the first round of the NCAA Tournament on Saturday in the Carrier Dome. SU is coming off a strong ACC tournament showing where Syracuse avenged a regular-season loss to Miami and jumped to the No. 3 seed in the Portland Regional. The Orange will tip off with the Atlantic-10 Conference champion Rams, who have won 12-straight en route to an NCAA Tournament appearance.Here’s three things that Fordham said ahead of Saturday’s game.Defense wins championshipsForward Mary Goulding won’t say it is “biblical,” but she doesn’t know if Syracuse takes as much pride in its defense as the Rams do. FU rode its seventh-ranked defense to a conference championship and enter the tournament as an imposing threat to the Orange’s offense-heavy attack.“With our defense, it’ll make them do something that they may not have done before,” Goulding said. “If they’re a strong 3-point shooting team, then they have to get to the basket. If they are wanted to get to the basket, shoot 3’s. Make them shoot pull-up jumpers in our face. Something that they’re not comfortable doing, that’s what we want them to do.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn consecutive conference tournament games, the Rams held their opponents to a season-low point total. It smothered No. 3 seed Duquesne and held it to only 34 points and in the championship game held No. 1 seed VCU to 47 points in Fordham’s 15-point win.FU head coach Stephanie Gaitley said the Rams would counter SU’s 3-point heavy attack by forcing shooters to put the ball on the floor.“We’re not going to take everything away,” Gaitley said, “so you’re going to have to pick your poison of what you’re going to give up because they have a lot of weapons.”Short rotationThe Rams only have seven players on its roster that play more than 10 minutes per game compared to a Syracuse team that has nine consistent contributors. But this is no longer the conference tournament where FU was required to play three games in three days, Gaitley said, and the Rams have had two weeks to rest to reconfigure.“I know coach Hillsman plays a lot more kids, but in this situation, at this point of the year, I’m not concerned with the rotation.”In-depth discussionThe Rams played Syracuse in the first round of the NCAA tournament the last time the Orange hosted NCAA Tournament competition — the first game of an eventual Final Four run. Fordham has experience with shooting in the Carrier Dome, and doesn’t see depth perception, the skewed perception of shooting in a room with such a high roof, as a major problem. She remembers playing the Orange in the NIT when she was with Monmouth, and her team played well.“The Carrier Dome doesn’t concern me,” Gaitley said. “The kids will follow your lead so if you have concerns, they’ll have concerns.”last_img read more

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