WHO raises avian flu case count to 97

first_imgMay 19, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) has significantly increased its tally of H5N1 avian influenza cases on the basis of information from Vietnam, bringing the total to 97 cases, including 53 deaths. The agency previously listed 89 cases with 52 deaths.In announcing the numbers today, the WHO did not identify any of the added cases individually, but said Vietnam’s Ministry of Health has been asked to provide data on individual cases.The new tally implies that some confirmed cases have gone unreported by major news media. The numbers push the WHO’s count above an unofficial count maintained by CIDRAP on the basis of both WHO numbers and media reports of confirmed cases. The unofficial count stood at 92 cases with 53 deaths before the new WHO announcement.The new WHO numbers represent an overall case-fatality rate of about 55%. Until recently, the fatality rate had hovered in the 70% range.A new WHO table of H5N1 cases breaks them down into three time periods: Dec 26, 2003, to Mar 10, 2004; July 19 to Oct 8, 2004; and Dec 16, 2004, to May 13, 2005.In the latest wave of cases, Vietnam has had 17 deaths among 49 cases, according to the WHO, for a fatality rate of about 35%. Since December 2003, the country has had a total of 76 cases with 37 deaths, for a fatality rate of 49%.Thailand has had 12 deaths among 17 cases, all of them occurring in the first two time periods. Cambodia’s four cases—all fatal—have all occurred since mid-December.See also:May 19 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_05_19/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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Trotter making his mark in Borland’s absence

first_imgJen SmallWhen redshirt senior linebacker Chris Borland went down with a right hamstring injury in the first quarter against Illinois Oct. 19, Wisconsin already had built a commanding 21-0 lead over the ailing Illini.Through one quarter of play, Wisconsin had allowed zero points and showed no signs of slowing.In other words, Borland’s replacement for the rest of the game didn’t need to be perfect. He just needed to play well enough to prevent the Illini from climbing back into the game.Enter redshirt junior linebacker Marcus Trotter.In the three quarters that followed, the Wisconsin defense would loosen up somewhat without it’s leader on the field — Illinois managed to put 32 points on the scoreboard before the game was done — but Trotter didn’t disappoint his teammates or the Wisconsin fans who made the four-hour drive to Champaign, Ill.On the night, Trotter would lead the defense with nine tackles — four more than his season total at that point — and even managed to grab a fumble recovery.For many college players without much game experience, being called to action at the drop of a hat would be considered a nightmare, but Trotter said a similar situation last year in which Borland was injured against Indiana helped prepare him mentally should the situation arise again.“The previous year against Indiana, the same thing happened,” Trotter said. “It was a really tight game. I think we were pulling away at the end of the third quarter, and Borland got hurt and I went in. I think that really prepared me for this year if that were to happen.”One week later, Trotter followed up his performance at Illinois with his first career start at Iowa Saturday. Again he led the team in tackles — again amassing nine over four quarters of play.With Trotter coming off the bench having seen little time on the field, redshirt senior linebacker Ethan Armstrong attributed the two-time academic all-Big Ten linebacker’s intelligence for the relatively seamless transition between Borland and Trotter.“His biggest strength is his head, his smartness,” Armstrong said. “His ability to read and recognize things and take it from the practice field into the game have really helped him.”Still, ask Trotter if he was pleased with either of his performances, and the conversation quickly changes direction. It’s not that he didn’t enjoy helping his team earn two back-to-back wins or leading the defense in tackles. But when you play backup to one of the best college inside linebackers in the country, the bar is set pretty high.“I’ve learned a lot from [Borland],” Trotter said. “Some of the things he can do, you can’t teach. Just to know that maybe someday I might get that same opportunity to lead the team is always good motivation to improve.”Escaping from the shadowsAnd yet, as Trotter finally begins to enter the weekly conversations of Badger fans across the country, his two weeks in the spotlight for Wisconsin almost didn’t happen.Four years ago, as a senior at Marquette High School in Milwaukee, Trotter was convinced that he would choose Minnesota on signing day. His brother, Michael, who had played with him at Marquette, had been getting more attention from colleges and had already decided on Wisconsin.That year, the Hilltoppers ran all over the Greater Metro Conference to the tune of a 14-0 record, with Michael getting most of the credit. If Marcus went to UW with him, he risked staying in his brother’s shadow yet again.“I don’t know why, but I thought it would be a good opportunity for me to go there and maybe try something new,” Trotter said.But when the day came, Marcus chose Wisconsin — eager to prove himself as a walk on.“Deep down in my heart, I knew I wanted to play with my brother,” Trotter said.Fast-forward through the first few years of both their college careers and things have gone how most observers would have expected. Michael went on to play in 25 games in the 2011 and 2012 season, starting three times. Meanwhile Marcus played sparingly in nine games.This year, however, things have been different.Through eight games this season, Marcus has played in five, including his lone start against Iowa on Nov. 2. Meanwhile, Michael has appeared in just 3 games.And yet, despite the competitive nature of their relationship, their bond as brothers runs even deeper. In fact, over the last two weeks, Michael claims he has become Marcus’ loudest, most obnoxious cheerleader.“I think if you would have filmed me during the game, you’d be like, ‘Wow, this guy is ridiculous,’ because every time he made a tackle I was really excited,” Michael said. “I’m Marcus’ biggest fan. …  It’s hard not to get antsy for him.”While Marcus’ days in the spotlight this season may soon be fading as Borland becomes healthy enough to play once again, both brothers have their eyes on a starting spot next year.Should their plans work out, the brothers hope to end their college football days in a similar fashion to their high school days: dominating the competition on their way to a conference title.“I think when the time comes that Marcus and I get to play on the field together again, it is going to be so much fun,” Michael said. “At Marquette senior year he made my job so easy … so I get excited thinking about us doing that again.”last_img read more

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Warriors’ DeMarcus Cousins nets season-high 27 points, Steve Kerr credits rotation change

first_imgDeMarcus Cousins had his best night as a Warrior.The four-time All-Star recorded a season-high 27 points in Golden State’s 106-104 win over the Rockets on Wednesday. It was his highest point total since joining the team in January. Coach Steve Kerr credited a new rotation and, of course, offered plenty of praise for Cousins, who is still learning the ins and outs of the six-time championship squad.“We’ve got to remind ourselves it’s still pretty early in the process,” Kerr told reporters after the game. “I don’t know how many games he’s played for us — 20. We’re all learning, me too. I’ve got to learn how to use him better. I thought we used him better tonight. I thought he did a phenomenal job of getting down on the block and controlling the game down there. Related News Draymond Green, Kevin Durant rush to defend DeMarcus Cousins after Warriors bounce back In Golden State, Cousins is averaging 15.2 points and 7.8 rebounds through 20 games.The Warriors sit atop the Western Conference with a 46-21 record. They are just 1.5 games ahead of the second-seeded Nuggets and now 4.5 games ahead of the Rockets, who hold are the third seed. “It’s a good win for us.”Steve Kerr says the Warriors are figuring out how to use DeMarcus Cousins better. They’re now separating him and Draymond some in the rotation, improving spacing around his post ups. That’ll likely continue. pic.twitter.com/wQodWrjEzr— Anthony Slater (@anthonyVslater) March 14, 2019Cousins came to the Warriors via the Pelicans. However, Cousins missed the rest of 2017-18 after tearing his Achilles last season in late January. He averaged 25.2 points and 12.9 rebounds in 48 games with New Orleans.last_img read more

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Teacher’s actions debated

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals El Monte police and Mountain View School District officials have been investigating allegations a Maxson teacher, whom parents and students identified as Jonathan Santamaria, restrained three third-graders with computer cords earlier this week. School officials said the teacher has been placed on paid leave during the investigation, which should be complete next week. Efforts to reach Santamaria or his attorney were unsuccessful. El Monte police Detective Eric Youngquist said Santamaria is expected to make a statement to police early next week. Then, Youngquist said, he can submit his report to the District Attorney’s Office. Third-grader Carolina Maciel, 8, said the teacher first tied Ramirez to a chair after he and another boy were playing on a table and then jumped off. A third student, a girl, said to the teacher, “Tie me! Tie me!” Maciel said the teacher then tied the girl to the chair, but the second boy tied himself. The two restrained boys often disturb the class, said third-grader Anthony Angel, 8. “Sometimes (Santamaria) gets a little mad when they don’t listen or they do something bad or when they lie,” Angel said. Ramirez’s mother, Nancy, said she’s not mad at the teacher, nor has she heard complaints about him. She hopes he returns to the classroom. esther.chou@sgvn.com 626-962-8811, Ext. 2513160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! EL MONTE – An 8-year-old boy said Friday he thought it was funny when his teacher tied him to his chair. When it comes to discipline, Ivan Ramirez, a third-grade student at Maxson Elementary School, said his teacher is too nice to him. Ramirez said his teacher tied him at the waist to the chair because “I keep standing up and he wants me to sit down.” But the two other students – a boy and a girl – who were allegedly tied up by the same teacher didn’t think it was as amusing, according to Ramirez. “They were like sad. They were too embarrassed,” Ramirez said. last_img read more

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Tuscaloosa City middle schools went on a shopping

first_imgTuscaloosa City middle schools went on a shopping spree for books today at the Barnes & Noble in Midtown Village thanks to help from Read BAMA Read.The Read BAMA Read Foundation donated a total of $25,000 to five Tuscaloosa City middle schools. The schools each received $5,000 to purchase new books for their library. Head coach of the Alabama gymnastics team Dana Duckworth, who’s also a co-founder of Read BAMA Read, said reading is extremely important because of the positive influence of literacy.“We know that if you can read and you can comprehend what you’re reading that you are a better learner and you can go on to bigger and better things,” said Duckworth. “And so I want people to realize it’s called Read Bama Read, because it’s about Alabama and improving the opportunity for literacy in our entire state.”last_img read more

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