El Chapo charged with 12 killings; Mexican cartel leader commits suicide

first_img U.S. donates helicopters to bolster the Honduran Army’s counter-narcotics fight The United States recently donated several CH-47F Chinook and UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters to the Honduran Army, aircraft which will enable the Honduran military to reach narco-trafficking hotbeds in remote areas more quickly. The helicopters will transport troops to areas in the departments of Gracias a Dios, Colón and Olancho in a matter of hours. Without the aircraft, it would typically take as many as eight days to transport troops to such areas, by land and sea. In a new 48-page federal indictment, U.S. authorities charge El Chapo and his top lieutenant, Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada, with ordering 12 killings and dozens of other acts of violence to promote the Sinaloa Cartel’s criminal activities. The two drug kingpins ordered the killings of Mexican law enforcement agents, members of the military, public officials, and rival drug cartel leaders, the indictment alleges. El Chapo has been imprisoned since Mexican Marines captured him in his seaside apartment in Mazatlán on February 22. The helicopters will help Honduran troops in multiple ways. The two drug kingpins also allegedly ordered the 2008 killing of Rafael Ramírez Jaime, who was an official in the State of Mexico’s Attorney General’s office. A gunman or gunmen shot him to death in his home near Mexico City. In addition to ordering the killings of law enforcement officials, El Chapo and El Mayo also directed the assassinations of drug cartel rivals. For example, the two drug kingpins allegedly ordered the 2004 killing of Rodolfo Carrillo Fuentes, who was a leader of the Juárez Cartel. He was known as “The Golden Child.” Gunmen shot The Golden Child to death in in the parking lot of a movie theater in the Sinaloa state capital in of Culiacán in 2004. The indictment accuses El Chapo and El Mayo with ordering the 2008 killing of Roberto Velasco Bravo, who was the head of the Mexico’s Organized Crime Investigation Unit. A gunman or gunmen shot him to death in the Tepito neighborhood of Mexico City. “This support is vital for us. It saves us time, minimizes risks and gives us an enhanced operational capacity. We’ve always had a good relationship with the U.S. Armed Forces. They’ve always helped us with training and cooperation and that strengthens our country.” The helicopters will help Honduran troops in multiple ways. The two drug kingpins also allegedly ordered the 2008 killing of Rafael Ramírez Jaime, who was an official in the State of Mexico’s Attorney General’s office. A gunman or gunmen shot him to death in his home near Mexico City. In addition to ordering the killings of law enforcement officials, El Chapo and El Mayo also directed the assassinations of drug cartel rivals. For example, the two drug kingpins allegedly ordered the 2004 killing of Rodolfo Carrillo Fuentes, who was a leader of the Juárez Cartel. He was known as “The Golden Child.” Gunmen shot The Golden Child to death in in the parking lot of a movie theater in the Sinaloa state capital in of Culiacán in 2004. “When he saw that there was no escape, he shot himself,” said Gonzalo Ponce, a spokesman for the Mexican government. Even as El Chapo faces charges while under arrest, Benjamín Mondragón Pereda, the leader of the Guerrero Unidos Cartel, committed suicide October 14 to avoid being arrested in the city of Juitepec in the state of Morelos. Even as El Chapo faces charges while under arrest, Benjamín Mondragón Pereda, the leader of the Guerrero Unidos Cartel, committed suicide October 14 to avoid being arrested in the city of Juitepec in the state of Morelos. Mexican drug cartel leader kills himself to avoid arrest “The fact that (the U.S. military) provides us with logistics and personnel transportation support allows us to have more training time which results in a better performance in the Gracias a Dios region,” said Honduras Army Lt Col. Norman Bustillo, the Joint Chief of Staff’s operations director. The Guerrero Unidos Cartel is suspected of transporting large amounts of marijuana and heroin to the U.S. city of Chicago in the state of Illinois. In a new 48-page federal indictment, U.S. authorities charge El Chapo and his top lieutenant, Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada, with ordering 12 killings and dozens of other acts of violence to promote the Sinaloa Cartel’s criminal activities. The two drug kingpins ordered the killings of Mexican law enforcement agents, members of the military, public officials, and rival drug cartel leaders, the indictment alleges. Meanwhile, thanks to international cooperation, the Honduran Army’s 4th Battalion’s airborne efforts to fight drug trafficking is getting a boost. “When he saw that there was no escape, he shot himself,” said Gonzalo Ponce, a spokesman for the Mexican government. Before the Mexican Marines captured him in February, Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, the longtime leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, was the world’s most-wanted drug kingpin. U.S. federal authorities have accused him and his cartel of trafficking large amounts of cocaine, heroin, and synthetic drugs into the United States. El Mayo, who remains at large, has replaced El Chapo as the leader of the “largest drug trafficking organization in the world,” according to the indictment. It further alleges that he and El Chapo used their “network of corrupt police and political contacts” to oversee “a large-scale narcotics transportation network involving the use of land, air and sea transportation assets, shipping multi-ton quantities of cocaine from South America, through Central America and Mexico, and finally into the U.S.”. Before the Mexican Marines captured him in February, Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, the longtime leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, was the world’s most-wanted drug kingpin. U.S. federal authorities have accused him and his cartel of trafficking large amounts of cocaine, heroin, and synthetic drugs into the United States. Meanwhile, thanks to international cooperation, the Honduran Army’s 4th Battalion’s airborne efforts to fight drug trafficking is getting a boost. Federal authorities in five U.S. states have previously indicted El Chapo for drug trafficking, homicide, and other crimes. In addition to New York, El Chapo is facing federal charges in the states of California, Texas, Florida, New Hampshire, and Illinois. Mexican military and law enforcement officials suspect El Mayo is in hiding in the mountains in the state of Sinaloa, where the cartel’s operations are based. The indictment accuses El Chapo and El Mayo with ordering the 2008 killing of Roberto Velasco Bravo, who was the head of the Mexico’s Organized Crime Investigation Unit. A gunman or gunmen shot him to death in the Tepito neighborhood of Mexico City. El Mayo, who remains at large, has replaced El Chapo as the leader of the “largest drug trafficking organization in the world,” according to the indictment. It further alleges that he and El Chapo used their “network of corrupt police and political contacts” to oversee “a large-scale narcotics transportation network involving the use of land, air and sea transportation assets, shipping multi-ton quantities of cocaine from South America, through Central America and Mexico, and finally into the U.S.”. The 21-count indictment accuses El Chapo and El Mayo of directing hit men to commit “hundreds of acts of violence, including murders, assaults, kidnappings, assassinations and acts of torture.” Handed down by a federal grand jury in Brooklyn, New York, it was unsealed in late September. “This support is vital for us. It saves us time, minimizes risks and gives us an enhanced operational capacity. We’ve always had a good relationship with the U.S. Armed Forces. They’ve always helped us with training and cooperation and that strengthens our country.” “The fact that (the U.S. military) provides us with logistics and personnel transportation support allows us to have more training time which results in a better performance in the Gracias a Dios region,” said Honduras Army Lt Col. Norman Bustillo, the Joint Chief of Staff’s operations director. Mexican drug cartel leader kills himself to avoid arrest By Dialogo October 16, 2014 El Chapo has been imprisoned since Mexican Marines captured him in his seaside apartment in Mazatlán on February 22. U.S. donates helicopters to bolster the Honduran Army’s counter-narcotics fight The 21-count indictment accuses El Chapo and El Mayo of directing hit men to commit “hundreds of acts of violence, including murders, assaults, kidnappings, assassinations and acts of torture.” Handed down by a federal grand jury in Brooklyn, New York, it was unsealed in late September. The United States recently donated several CH-47F Chinook and UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters to the Honduran Army, aircraft which will enable the Honduran military to reach narco-trafficking hotbeds in remote areas more quickly. The helicopters will transport troops to areas in the departments of Gracias a Dios, Colón and Olancho in a matter of hours. Without the aircraft, it would typically take as many as eight days to transport troops to such areas, by land and sea. Federal authorities in five U.S. states have previously indicted El Chapo for drug trafficking, homicide, and other crimes. In addition to New York, El Chapo is facing federal charges in the states of California, Texas, Florida, New Hampshire, and Illinois. Mexican military and law enforcement officials suspect El Mayo is in hiding in the mountains in the state of Sinaloa, where the cartel’s operations are based. The Guerrero Unidos Cartel is suspected of transporting large amounts of marijuana and heroin to the U.S. city of Chicago in the state of Illinois. The helicopters will also help Honduras provide public safety while it builds schools and health care facilities and maintains important infrastructure, such as roads and bridges. The helicopters will also help Honduras provide public safety while it builds schools and health care facilities and maintains important infrastructure, such as roads and bridges.last_img read more

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Hancock’s Bagley overcomes obstacles to claim international free-throw title

first_img Bio Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all) Latest Posts Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at mmandell@ellsworthamerican.com.center_img Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020 HANCOCK — For the past year and a half, nothing has stopped Kaylee Bagley’s mission to improve.From making less than one-third of her attempts in her first free-throw shooting competition to dealing with illnesses on two separate competition days, Bagley has faced her share of obstacles. Despite everything, the 10-year-old Hancock native has continued her drive toward becoming one of America’s best young free-throw shooters.That journey saw a rewarding conclusion Saturday as she received the international title for her age group in the Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship. As a reward for beating out thousands of other girls from the United States and Canada, Bagley received a glass trophy commemorating her achievement at a ceremony in Brewer.“She’s come a long way from when she got started,” said Kaylee’s mother, Christine. “She loves basketball, and she’s just been so determined and stuck with it no matter what.”This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textBagley’s first competition came as an 8-year-old 18 months ago. In her first competition at the local level, she made just 7 of 25 from the free-throw line.Instead of giving up, Kaylee set an ultimate goal for herself. As she and her parents walked toward the car to go home that day, Kaylee told them her goal was to make it to nationals.“I knew I could make more shots every day if I tried,” Kaylee said. “I knew I could do it if I worked harder and just kept practicing.”Kaylee said she practiced her free throws for an hour and a half in the buildup to the competition. Her parents made trips with her each day to the Hancock Grammar School gymnasium, where Kaylee would practice free-throw shooting for an hour and a half.Kaylee Bagley poses with her trophy and medal after winning the state’s Elks Free Throw Hoop Shoot for the 8-9 age group Jan. 28, 2017, in Bath. Bagley, who made 18 of 25 free throws at the 2017 Elks event, improved her total to 23 of 25 at this year’s Knights of Columbus state championships to win the international title. FILE PHOTOEach day, Kaylee got better and better. Then, on Jan. 28, 2017, she made 18 of her 25 shots to win the 8-9 age group at the state’s Elks Free Throw Hoop Shoot in Bath.“It was amazing how much better she got in just a short amount of time,” said Kaylee’s father, Shawn. “She went in with her goal of how many she wanted to make, and she kept increasing them every day.”In 2018, though, Kaylee was faced with some untimely setbacks. When a stomach bug forced her to forego this year’s Elks competition, she was forced to compete in the Knights of Columbus event instead.Yet the day before the Knights of Columbus district championships, Kaylee fell sick once again. Fortunately, an impending snowstorm that was set to hit eastern Maine the next day forced tournament officials to postpone the event.“I remember picking her up from school that day, and I said, ‘Honey, they postponed it,’” Christine said. “All of the sudden, I see tears of joy on her face and a look that said, ‘Thank God.’”Another complicating factor was that the free-throw lines used in the Knights of Columbus competition were slightly farther back than those used in the Elks competition. It also didn’t require other contestants and spectators to sit in complete silence as competitors were shooting.To get used to the new distance, Kaylee used a tape measure to adjust the distance of the shot she had to make. Her parents and brother, Jacob, helped her adjust to the noise change by making animal sounds and creating other distractions in the background as she shot.After strong showings at the district championships and regional championships, Kaylee made 23 of 25 at the state championship to claim the Maine title. Her score there was compared to others from the same age group in the United States and Canada to determine the international champion, and after the final results were tallied over the next several weeks, Kaylee was the winner.“The first week of May, we got a letter from the Knights of Columbus corporate office in Connecticut saying she had placed the highest in her age group,” Shawn said. “She’s wanted Saturday night to come ever since.”Although Kaylee has been playing basketball since before she was kindergarten, her interest in free-throw competitions came from watching Jacob take part in them. Although she wasn’t old enough to compete when Jacob, now 11, became eligible, seeing him compete inspired her to do so herself.Despite the fact that Kaylee and Jacob have what Christine called a “rivalry” between the two of them in the sport, Jacob is also his sister’s biggest fan. When Kaylee won her first competition at Elks last year, Jacob was there applauding his sister and yelling her name in celebration. His display was so exuberant that a committee member later recognized him for his passion.“He came over and pointed to Jacob, and he said, ‘You, young man, are the reason why we do this,’” Christine said. “As a parent, to see both of them recognized like that was very special.”As for Kaylee, she will continue to play on her AAU team, Black Bear North, as well as in local recreational leagues. If her massive improvement at the free-throw line is any indication of how far she can go, the sky is the limit.“Your kids can surprise you in amazing ways,” Christine said. “When she made those seven shots the first time, we never thought she would be here then. She proved everybody wrong.” MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020last_img read more

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