Long road trip continues for Syracuse in Orlando for Citrus Classic

first_imgWhen the 2013 regular season ends for Syracuse, it will have played 38 games. Only 10 of them will have been at home.The team begins its season with 20 road games spread out over three weekends, plus a Spring Break trip to Hawaii. The Orange (4-5) has already traveled to Charleston, S.C., Palm Springs, Calif., and has trips to Orlando, Fla., and Honolulu, Hawaii, in the coming weeks.This weekend, the team makes a trip to Orlando for the Citrus Classic, where it will meet Louisiana State, Boston College, Longwood, Texas and Mississippi State, starting with the Tigers on Friday at 1:15 p.m. After going 1-4 at the Mary Nutter Collegiate Classic last weekend, the team is looking to get on track. The time on the road is bringing the Orange together, but it doesn’t have it all figured out just yet.“I think that any time you travel as a team, you get closer,” SU head coach Leigh Ross said. “You really bond once you start traveling. You’re on the bus for hours, in hotel rooms, eat meals together and you get to learn a lot about one another.”Aside from the softball and downtime, Ross uses rooming assignments to bring her team closer together. The players are given new roommates each trip, allowing girls of all positions, ages and backgrounds to get to know one another.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSenior center fielder Veronica Grant has experienced it for the last four years. She sees the team’s adaptation to all the traveling as a process that simply takes time.“I think at the beginning, we’re slow to get used to it,” Grant said. “But I think after that, we get in the swing of things knowing what’s coming up next, especially the underclassmen.”At this point of the season, traveling has presented the Orange with two problems. First, life on the road is taking a physical toll on the team. Ross said she sees every year that, as the team moves deeper into its schedule, its overall stamina slightly wavers.To keep the team in shape, coaches hold workouts on the road, get the players to bed on time and let them catch up on sleep when they have games later in the day.“It’s hard to travel and then come back to Syracuse and go right to practice sometimes,” SU first baseman Jasmine Watson said. “Our bodies just get tired. We aren’t necessarily tired, but our bodies are.”The second problem the team is facing is a lack of consistent leadership. After losing seven seniors at the end of last season, the Orange is a less experienced team than it was a year ago.As the season moves on, no players want the team to sink into mediocrity. As the Orange continues to tune up for conference play, which begins March 29, the time for players to step up is now.“We’ve got some kids that need to pick it up and grab those leadership roles, because we have a lot of people sitting back and waiting for others to step up,” Ross said. “But player-for-player, we can stand with any team in the country, it’s just a matter of them believing that and gaining the necessary experience.” Comments Published on February 28, 2013 at 2:02 am Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesse Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Jaquith contributes at midfield after missing sophomore year with torn ACL

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ It was the first game of the Syracuse women’s lacrosse fall ball season, and Gabby Jaquith was coming off a stellar freshman campaign. She was poised to be one of the offense’s top weapons, and it was her time to prove it.But then her knee turned awkwardly while running on the field and she felt a sharp pain. In an instant, a season to help contend for a national championship became a season of rehabilitation.“Having to sit through all of last season watching everyone play was definitely hard for me, mentally and physically,” Jaquith said. “But I feel as if it kind of made me stronger.” After being forced to sit out her entire sophomore year with a torn ACL, Jaquith hasn’t missed a beat in her junior year for Syracuse (15-1, 5-1 Atlantic Coast). She’s ranked seventh in points — with 13 goals and nine assists — on the third-best scoring team in the nation. The midfielder is ranked first out of the starters with a .619 shooting percentage, and has scored in three of the past four games. The adjustment process was a difficult one, filled with mistakes and uncertainty. But now she’s a valuable piece on the country’s top-ranked team, and has started 14 of SU’s 16 games. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I think the upside is she’s watched a lot of lacrosse and her lacrosse IQ has gone up,” SU head coach Gary Gait said. “She’s the type of player that’s always made big plays in big games. I think she’s getting there.” To get back to full strength, Jaquith has done work on the side this season, which included passing, shooting and playing wall ball just to make sure that her knee is 100 percent. When she was rehabbing, though, her work meant squats and lunges. Then, there was lifting, running and agility exercises. Jaquith had been robbed of her ability to play, but was doing everything possible to make a quick return. “It’s tough coming back from an ACL injury and having it repaired surgically, going through all the rehab and all the time it takes to try and get back to where you were physically,” Gait said. “I think she continues to do that.” When she first got back into practicing, things didn’t go nearly as smoothly as they had in the past. She was nervous, and had trouble adjusting back into what had been natural for her just a year before. So she would seek out the advice of Alyssa Murray, SU’s points leader in 2013. Murray had gone through an ACL tear in her senior year of high school, and Jaquith was a sponge when it came to her advice. “She comes up to me and is always talking herself through the plays to make sure she’s got it straight,” Murray said. “She knows what works for her. She does whatever it takes to make sure she’s mentally prepared.” Senior Bridget Daley, who just returned from an injury on Saturday that sidelined her for nearly the entire 2014 season, said that Jaquith was someone that always stuck by her to make sure she was OK. She said that the two shared a bond having had to miss significant time and had other topics of conversation, besides their injuries. “She would just be normal,” Daley said. “Because with a lot of people, (the injury) is all they want to talk about. “That’s probably the most appreciated thing.” As the ACC tournament quickly approaches on Thursday, Jaquith will have the opportunity to make up for what many would call lost time. But for Jaquith, it was an experience that made her stronger. “I still think there’s room for me to grow, definitely,” Jaquith said. “But right now I think things are going really well and I’m really excited for the postseason.” Comments Published on April 23, 2014 at 1:30 am Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3last_img read more

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Syracuse splits doubleheader with Army

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse (16-12, 4-5 Atlantic Coast) split its doubleheader with Army (11-17, 2-1 Patriot) on Wednesday afternoon in West Point, New York. The Orange won the first game, 4-1, with Alexa Romero throwing a career-best 14 strikeouts in a complete game effort. Army got its revenge in the rematch and downed SU, 5-1.In the first game, Syracuse scored all four of its runs in the second inning. After a Toni Martin bunt advanced Gabby Teran to third base, Lailoni Mayfield singled to give SU its first run of the game. A batter later, Michala Maciolek extended the lead to three with a two-RBI single to left center.Alexa Romero started in the circle, three days after allowing five runs in four innings against Florida State. The sophomore returned to the top of her game, pitching a complete game and striking out a career-high 14 hitters. Romero registered her record-breaking 14th strikeout on the last batter of the game. It was the second time she achieved her record on the last batter this season, with the first time coming on March 13 against Elon.Although Syracuse’s bats went quiet after the second inning, mustering just three hits, Romero’s brilliance preserved the lead. Army finally got on the board in the sixth inning when Amelia Trotter hit a solo shot to center field, but it did not spark a comeback.Martin got things started again in the second game with an RBI single in the first inning with two outs. Army then evened the score in the second inning when Kristen McPeek smacked an RBI double to left center.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAnnaMarie Gatti started in the circle for SU. She allowed one run in the first two innings before two throwing errors — one apiece from Gatti and Sammy Fernandez — handed Army four unearned runs in the third. After the third, neither team scored a run for the rest of the game. The Orange tallied just one hit after the second inning.Syracuse resumes play on Saturday with its home opener, a doubleheader against Boston College set to start at 1 p.m. Comments Published on March 28, 2018 at 7:03 pm Contact David: ddschnei@syr.edulast_img read more

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Amnesty period granted for miners to pay arrears to GGMC

first_imgThe Guyana Geology and Mines Commission (GGMC) has embarked on an amnesty period, which commenced on October 1, allowing miners to make payments if they were behind on rental payments. In a notice, the Commission informed that the Natural Resources Ministry was flanked by numerous requests from miners, who were lagging in their payments for renting medium-scale properties.A grace period is extended to all medium-scale property holders who are in arrears or those whose properties have not already been cancelled in the official gazette. Adding to that, 50 per cent of the accumulated penalty on these debts will be waived.“The penalty accrued on said arrears will attract a waiver of fifty per cent,” the notice read.Miners were warned that the grace period will end on December 31, 2019, and will not be extended. For those who do not make use of this opportunity, their properties will be cancelled. The outstanding payments of rentals should be deposited prior to the said deadline.Miners have been faced with a number of challenges in the extraction of gold, with deplorable interior trails being a chief issue. In July, a large number of miners and other business operators complained of not being able to reach the mining areas to work owing to the deplorable state of the Itaballi-Puruni Road, Region Seven (Cuyuni-Mazaruni).The Itaballi-Puruni Road is the main thoroughfare used by persons in accessing the gold mining districts of Puruni Number 3, Cuyuni Number 4, and the Middle Mazaruni area, Region Seven from the Papishou Landing. The Puruni Road runs from the community of Itaballi, Mazaruni River, Lower Mazaruni, to the Papishou Landing, Mazaruni River, and Middle Mazaruni, and is the only entrance and exit to various key sections of Region Seven.However, gold declarations by the Guyana Gold Board (GGB) for 2019 are expected to be surpassed by the end of this year in light of the records for the past six months which are higher than expected.In January, the GGB had projected that for 2019, declarations and exportations are to be pegged at 651,000 ounces. This estimation was established in retrospect to the outcome from 2018, which turned out to be an “encouraging year” for the organisation.last_img read more

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