Governor Wolf Signs Laws Creating Nonprofit Security Grant Fund, Keystone Tree Fund

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Signs Laws Creating Nonprofit Security Grant Fund, Keystone Tree Fund November 07, 2019center_img Bill Signing,  Government That Works,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf signed into law House Bill 859 to assist non-profits with safety and security measures. The legislation was requested in response to attacks against the Jewish community, including the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh.“Schools and other community institutions should be a safe place for every child and resident,” said Gov. Wolf. “I thank the bipartisan efforts that helped ensure safety and security funding was available for these non-profit, community institutions where people gather and should have peace of mind.”Gov. Wolf also signed the following bills:House Bill 374, which creates the Pennsylvania Keystone Tree Fund and allows citizens to make a voluntary $3 contribution by checking a box on the PennDOT driver’s license application and renewal form. The contributions will be used to fund programs within the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources that use trees to help filter pollutants from waterways.House Bill 407, which creates a uniform definition for the term “blight” for legislation enacted in 1937 or later.House Bill 510, House Bill 511, and House Bill 512, which support intergovernmental agreements between local municipalities.House Bill 1085, which repeals the State Personal Property Tax Act, first enacted on June 22, 1935.Senate Bill 694, which amends the Oil and Gas Lease Act to allow for cross unit drilling for unconventional wells.last_img read more

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FPSO BW Adolo heads to Tortue field offshore Gabon

first_imgBW Offshore’s FPSO BW Adolo has sailed away from Singapore and is currently in transit to the Tortue field offshore Gabon.The Adolo FPSO had previously worked on the Azurite field but it was later selected by BW for the Tortue development. The FPSO unit was prepared for deployment at Tortue by a Keppel shipyard in Singapore and officially named FPSO BW Adolo in early April.The Tortue field is one of four proven discoveries in the Ruche area, within the Dussafu License, offshore Gabon.The FPSO owner said on Sunday, July 2 that the BW Adolo was expected to arrive at the field in August 2018.The BW Adolo has an oil storage capacity of 1,350,000 barrels and a production capacity of 40,000 barrels of oil per day.The Tortue structure is operated by BW Energy Gabon (BWEG), which holds a 91.667 percent interest while its partner Panoro holds a 8.33 percent interest. BW Energy is a subsidiary of BW Offshore.“We are firmly on track for first oil later this year,” said BW Offshore CEO, Carl K. Arnet.Arnet added: “The BW Adolo was completed on time, with increased life extension scope enabling an extended production profile on the back of positive reserve developments.”In a separate statement on Monday, Panoro said that the Tortue development project remained on course to deliver first oil at Dussafu in 2H 2018.Oil from the two wells at the Tortue field, from the Gamba and Dentale reservoirs, will be produced into the Adolo FPSO via subsea trees and flowlines.Once production is achieved, further wells are planned to be drilled in the area to tie back additional resources from Tortue and other fields nearby.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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Irfan Peljto Referee of Final of the U19 European Championship: This is a Historic Moment for BiH

first_imgFor Irfan Peljto, his first reaction was shock and then a strong sense of pride on discovering he had been selected to referee Saturday’s Under-19 EURO final between Portugal and Spain.“I was stunned,” the Bosnian match official says. “It didn’t sink in for a few seconds, but when my colleagues started clapping and I saw my name on the screen, it was fantastic. A referee from Bosnia and Herzegovina has never had this opportunity, so it’s historic for my country and for my football federation. We’re a football nation and for everyone from a small country when you do it for your country, it is huge.”It is an honour and challenge that the Sarajevo-based lawyer is delighted to take on, having already refereed the Czech Republic v France and Spain v Italy group fixtures. He will do so with the same assistant referees as in those games – Romania’s Valentin Avram and Slovenia’s Grega Kordež – as well as fourth official Filip Glova from Slovakia. “They are very professional. They listen to what the referee wants from them. I believe in them 100%.”But will there be any nerves given the size of the occasion? “I always feel a little pressure, but a positive pressure,” continues Peljto in an interview for UEFA, an international referee since 2015. “We have a very important job to do on the pitch and a lot of people are expecting us to do our job perfectly, so in every game there are some positive nerves, but immediately when we blow the whistle it disappears.”During his time in Armenia, the 35-year-old has also blown out the candles on his birthday cake – a reminder of his wife and son at home, and the family life that helped form him as a referee. After all, his father Mesud is a former FIFA assistant referee. “I was born like a referee because my father was a referee,” he smiles, and that background meant he knew all about the role’s ups and downs before starting on his own path.It was at the age of 18 that he turned to refereeing, having stopping playing football after realising he would not reach a professional level as a player. “My father never forced me to be a referee, but one day I went home and I was putting on weight as I wasn’t doing any exercise and I said to him, ‘Can I be a referee?’ And he said, ‘Are you sure?’ I said, ‘Yes, 100%.’“He said, ‘Take your running shoes and come with me,’ and he drove me to a running track and told me to run seven laps in 12 minutes. He said, ‘If you can do that, I can help. I can give you tips and support but I can’t run for you.’ I passed the test and started with refereeing. Throughout my whole career, he’s been the toughest observer because he always finds something to improve on, but overall he is very happy!”And increasingly so, given his son’s progress. In April, Peljto refereed the UEFA Youth League semi-final between Hoffenheim and Porto in Nyon. Last October, he had his first taste of a UEFA Europa League group stage fixture when refereeing Salzburg v Rosenberg in Austria. “It was fantastic – a big stadium with a lot of people. It was a new experience and I’ll never forget it.”last_img read more

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