Franchise League 3-day tournament

first_imgBaldeo, Ivan hit contrasting centuriesBALCHAND Baldeo and Rajiv Ivan both struck contrasting hundreds as Upper Corentyne closed the second day of their seventh and final round of the Franchise League three-day tournament against Georgetown in a commanding position yesterday at the Port Mourant ground.Baldeo struck 107 off 133 balls, inclusive of 12 fours and two sixes while Ivan hit 102 in 117 balls, with nine fours and three sixes, as the hosts were bowled out for 440 in 91.3 overs.David Latchaya contributed 69 on day two.Bowling for the city side, Shemroy Barrington claimed 6-38 while leg-spinner Steven Sankar took 4-158.Meanwhile, at Everest, East Coast closed the opening day against East Bank on 184-3. Ameer Khan and Kamesh Yadram are unbeaten on 69 and 57 respectively.West Indies youth player Bhaskar Yadram had earlier contributed 38.At Tuschen, Essequibo closed on 124-4.The other seventh round game between hosts West Berbice and Lower Corentyne was abandoned without a ball being bowled at Bush Lot.last_img read more

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3 things Fordham said ahead of NCAA Tournament matchup with Syracuse

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 22, 2019 at 6:36 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcCleary Commentscenter_img No. 3 seed Syracuse (24-7, 10-8 Atlantic Coast) will host No. 14 seed Fordham for the first round of the NCAA Tournament on Saturday in the Carrier Dome. SU is coming off a strong ACC tournament showing where Syracuse avenged a regular-season loss to Miami and jumped to the No. 3 seed in the Portland Regional. The Orange will tip off with the Atlantic-10 Conference champion Rams, who have won 12-straight en route to an NCAA Tournament appearance.Here’s three things that Fordham said ahead of Saturday’s game.Defense wins championshipsForward Mary Goulding won’t say it is “biblical,” but she doesn’t know if Syracuse takes as much pride in its defense as the Rams do. FU rode its seventh-ranked defense to a conference championship and enter the tournament as an imposing threat to the Orange’s offense-heavy attack.“With our defense, it’ll make them do something that they may not have done before,” Goulding said. “If they’re a strong 3-point shooting team, then they have to get to the basket. If they are wanted to get to the basket, shoot 3’s. Make them shoot pull-up jumpers in our face. Something that they’re not comfortable doing, that’s what we want them to do.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn consecutive conference tournament games, the Rams held their opponents to a season-low point total. It smothered No. 3 seed Duquesne and held it to only 34 points and in the championship game held No. 1 seed VCU to 47 points in Fordham’s 15-point win.FU head coach Stephanie Gaitley said the Rams would counter SU’s 3-point heavy attack by forcing shooters to put the ball on the floor.“We’re not going to take everything away,” Gaitley said, “so you’re going to have to pick your poison of what you’re going to give up because they have a lot of weapons.”Short rotationThe Rams only have seven players on its roster that play more than 10 minutes per game compared to a Syracuse team that has nine consistent contributors. But this is no longer the conference tournament where FU was required to play three games in three days, Gaitley said, and the Rams have had two weeks to rest to reconfigure.“I know coach Hillsman plays a lot more kids, but in this situation, at this point of the year, I’m not concerned with the rotation.”In-depth discussionThe Rams played Syracuse in the first round of the NCAA tournament the last time the Orange hosted NCAA Tournament competition — the first game of an eventual Final Four run. Fordham has experience with shooting in the Carrier Dome, and doesn’t see depth perception, the skewed perception of shooting in a room with such a high roof, as a major problem. She remembers playing the Orange in the NIT when she was with Monmouth, and her team played well.“The Carrier Dome doesn’t concern me,” Gaitley said. “The kids will follow your lead so if you have concerns, they’ll have concerns.”last_img read more

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Irfan Peljto Referee of Final of the U19 European Championship: This is a Historic Moment for BiH

first_imgFor Irfan Peljto, his first reaction was shock and then a strong sense of pride on discovering he had been selected to referee Saturday’s Under-19 EURO final between Portugal and Spain.“I was stunned,” the Bosnian match official says. “It didn’t sink in for a few seconds, but when my colleagues started clapping and I saw my name on the screen, it was fantastic. A referee from Bosnia and Herzegovina has never had this opportunity, so it’s historic for my country and for my football federation. We’re a football nation and for everyone from a small country when you do it for your country, it is huge.”It is an honour and challenge that the Sarajevo-based lawyer is delighted to take on, having already refereed the Czech Republic v France and Spain v Italy group fixtures. He will do so with the same assistant referees as in those games – Romania’s Valentin Avram and Slovenia’s Grega Kordež – as well as fourth official Filip Glova from Slovakia. “They are very professional. They listen to what the referee wants from them. I believe in them 100%.”But will there be any nerves given the size of the occasion? “I always feel a little pressure, but a positive pressure,” continues Peljto in an interview for UEFA, an international referee since 2015. “We have a very important job to do on the pitch and a lot of people are expecting us to do our job perfectly, so in every game there are some positive nerves, but immediately when we blow the whistle it disappears.”During his time in Armenia, the 35-year-old has also blown out the candles on his birthday cake – a reminder of his wife and son at home, and the family life that helped form him as a referee. After all, his father Mesud is a former FIFA assistant referee. “I was born like a referee because my father was a referee,” he smiles, and that background meant he knew all about the role’s ups and downs before starting on his own path.It was at the age of 18 that he turned to refereeing, having stopping playing football after realising he would not reach a professional level as a player. “My father never forced me to be a referee, but one day I went home and I was putting on weight as I wasn’t doing any exercise and I said to him, ‘Can I be a referee?’ And he said, ‘Are you sure?’ I said, ‘Yes, 100%.’“He said, ‘Take your running shoes and come with me,’ and he drove me to a running track and told me to run seven laps in 12 minutes. He said, ‘If you can do that, I can help. I can give you tips and support but I can’t run for you.’ I passed the test and started with refereeing. Throughout my whole career, he’s been the toughest observer because he always finds something to improve on, but overall he is very happy!”And increasingly so, given his son’s progress. In April, Peljto refereed the UEFA Youth League semi-final between Hoffenheim and Porto in Nyon. Last October, he had his first taste of a UEFA Europa League group stage fixture when refereeing Salzburg v Rosenberg in Austria. “It was fantastic – a big stadium with a lot of people. It was a new experience and I’ll never forget it.”last_img read more

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