New thinking on coal, renewables taking hold in Southeast Asia

first_imgNew thinking on coal, renewables taking hold in Southeast Asia FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Eco-Business:The evidence is getting harder to dispute. Clean energy can provide 100 per cent of society’s electricity needs. Current renewable energy technology is reliable 24 hours a day, every day of the year, and industries’ insistence on using coal and other polluting sources for fear of intermittency—the inability of renewable energy to ensure an uninterrupted supply—no longer has a basis.So why does Southeast Asia continue to be a global laggard in renewable energy deployment?Rapid economic growth exceeding 4 per cent annually has seen the region double its energy consumption since 1995, and demand is expected to continue to grow by up to 4.7 per cent per year through to 2035. Coal largely feeds this demand, accounting for up to 40 per cent of consumption. But coal’s impact on climate change and air quality have made the need for a transition to clean energy more pressing than ever.For decades, Southeast Asian governments have helped the fossil fuels industry with generous subsidies.But energy subsidies should be cut back or scrapped altogether—except in cases where they serve a specific public purpose, such as giving the poor easier access to energy, or short-term incentives to get new clean energy technologies into the marketplace, says Peter du Pont of the Stockholm Environment Institute’s Asia Centre.Sara Jane Ahmed, energy finance analyst with the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), adds: “Governments need to be efficient with their use of capital. Subsidies are not necessary in an industry where there are cheaper competing technologies,” she says, referring to the tumbling price of solar.More: 7 ways to speed up Southeast Asia’s switch to renewable energylast_img read more

Read More →

US Embassy Barbados Provides PPE Funding For COVID-19 Response in the Eastern Caribbean

first_imgBy Steven McLoud/Diálogo June 03, 2020 With the high demand in the Eastern Caribbean for personal protective equipment (PPE) and other medical supplies due to COVID-19, the United States stepped up to assist their partner nations during this crisis.More than $100,000 worth of PPE and other medical supplies were donated to seven Eastern Caribbean countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.Through the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency’s (CDEMA) Regional Response Mechanism, these PPEs could be distributed to the countries. The supplies included 1,000 surgical masks, 500 face shields, 250 protective goggles, 1,200 latex gloves, 1,000 shoe covers, 10 gallons of hand sanitizers, and 87 hazmat suits.The supplies were packaged for each country and issued to their respective national disaster offices for distribution targeting those who are on the front line and are highly exposed, including essential services personnel and security forces.“This donation is one of several programs and initiatives the U.S. has provided to support our neighbors in the Eastern Caribbean”, said U.S. Coast Guard Commander Steve Charnon, senior Defense official at the U.S. Embassy in Barbados, which also oversees the U.S. Security Cooperation Offices (SCO) in the Eastern Caribbean. “Coordinating these donations to help combat COVID-19 was a true team effort and reflects the enduring partnership between the U.S. and the Eastern Caribbean, as well as regional organizations such as CDEMA and the Regional Security System.”These packages were made possible by the SCO and are part of the larger U.S. Southern Command’s Humanitarian Assistance Program, which conducts activities in conjunction with partner nations to alleviate human suffering, disease, hunger and privation, particularly in regions where those needs may pose major challenges to the civilian population.“The unprecedented nature of this pandemic requires collaborative efforts between our region and its partners to respond effectively to the needs of our participating states”, said Elizabeth Riley, CDEMA executive director. “I would like to express our thanks to the SCO and U.S. Embassy Barbados for its support to the region’s ongoing management of the COVID-19 impact,” she added.last_img read more

Read More →

Chinese Embassy vows cooperation with Boracay laws

first_imgChinese liaison officer Peter Tay saidConsul General Lou Gang with the Chinese Embassy officials for culture andtourism, met acting Malay mayor Floribar Bautista and other governmentofficials of the island to cooperate with the local government. Leonard Tirol, officer of the BoracayFire, Rescue and Volunteers Incorporated (BFRAV), said the ATVs will bestationed at the front beach. Others will be given to the Philippine NationalPolice for patrolling purposes. Chinese Embassy Consul General Lou Gang gives instructions to Chinese liaison officer Peter Tay during their visit in Boracay Island, Malay, Aklan. JUN AGUIRRE/PN Korean tourists came in second with334,201 tourist arrivals. Last March, Gang met with theofficials of the Department of Tourism to promote Boracay to the Chinesetourists. The Malay Municipal Tourism Officerecorded a total of 389,885 Chinese tourist arrivals from Jan. to Oct. thisyear. MALAY, Aklan – The Chinese Embassy inManila vowed cooperation in abiding with the local policies being implementedin Boracay Island. China together with Korea remained asthe top two sources of market, recording an 81 percent total of internationaltourist arrivals from Jan. to Oct. Aside from the courtesy visit, theChinese Embassy also donated six All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) worth around P1.4million to be used for Boracay’s local baywatch program.  “Mayor Bautista told the Consul aboutthe petty issues involving some Chinese nationals penalized for theirinvolvement in littering and smoking violations at the front beach. Hearingthis, Gang seeks a full copy of the existing local ordinance. This will be thentranslated into Chinese and the embassy will distribute it to the visitingChinese tourists to Boracay for their information,” Tay added.    They were followed by Taiwanese touristswith 28,455 arrivals./PNlast_img read more

Read More →

Panel discusses women’s involvement in political activism

first_img“I had to make this journey across the border to come for my education and everything [while] he’s out here calling us criminals, calling us all of these things right as he announced his campaign,” Meza said. The panelists said they hope the work of Ignite and other organizations in grassroots movements, and community engagement will help create cultural change across the country and achieve equality for all. Approximately 40 students, faculty and staff on Wednesday night attended a panel discussion at Bridge Hall about women’s involvement in the political sphere. The event, hosted by The Female Quotient, a female-owned business dedicated to advancing gender equality in the workplace, focused on encouraging women to participate in civic engagement and activism. (From left to right) Moderator Jaime Woo and Ignite leaders Gabriela Meza, a UCLA senior, Mai Mizuno, a USC senior, and Lily Larsen, a Santa Monica College freshman discussed the need for women to participate in civic engagement and politics. (Krystal Gallegos/Daily Trojan) “There really is a lack of opportunity in a lot of Los Angeles neighborhoods,” said Larsen, who is planning to run for Los Angeles City Council in 2020. Meza said the societal barriers set in place restrict women of color from advocating for change, which can be especially tiring in the field of activism work. Meza said that after the election, she realized she could not give up on her activist efforts since Trump’s win posed a threat to the rights of people within the immigrant community. Larsen, who grew up in Mid-City, Los Angeles, said her drive to serve in local politics stemmed from witnessing her friends face issues with law enforcement due to the lack of youth engagement programs. Mizuno said the 2016 presidential election prompted her to take a more active role in politics by getting involved in advocacy work around issues like educating youth about complex political issues like climate change. “It’s also about societal change and creating our own systems,” Meza said. “It’s really about breaking down those barriers of respectability as well, so we can fill that pipeline with all sorts of people.” “In that moment, I thought, ‘Now it’s real,’” Meza said. “Now, I really can’t give up on this organizing and Ignite or anything like that … [because] it’s really going to affect us in a different way, especially me and my community.”center_img “Now, our generation has to take charge,” Mizuno said. “There’s no one else doing it really or, at least, they’re not representing our interests.” “Whenever [problematic behavior] comes up, I try and have an honest conversation with the people, especially if they’re on my own team, about why we have to continue to learn,” Mizuno said. “Even for me, every single activist space is really a learning process.” Woo also co-wrote “Yes She Can,” which centers on the 10 young women who worked in the Obama administration. The book came to be recognized on The New York Times’ best-selling list. “[I want to] lift up the stories of people who are typically underrepresented: women, women of color,” said event moderator Jaime Woo, a graduate student in the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. “All of the people here, all of the women here today can … channel [powerful] energy.” The panelists discussed what motivated each of them to get involved in the political sphere and what served as the impetus for their interest in activism. Meza, a first-generation immigrant from Mexico, said she was motivated to pursue politics after hearing President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric. “It’s exhausting,” Meza said. “You’re dealing with these systemic issues at the same time where you’re trying to fight them.” Ignite, a nonpartisan organization that aims to empower women in politics, also co-sponsored the panel, which included Ignite leaders Gabriela Meza, a senior at UCLA, Lily Larsen, a freshman at Santa Monica College, and Mai Mizuno, a senior majoring in international relations and philosophy, politics and law at USC. When the panel opened up to questions from the audience, recent USC graduate Lynn Wang asked how to deal with issues like sexism and racism within advocacy organizations. last_img read more

Read More →