City Market, employee union reach a one-year collective bargaining agreement

first_imgSource: Onion River Co-op. Burlington, VT—July 14, 2009— Onion River Co-op Board of Directors announced the ratification of a one-year labor contract between the Co-op and the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers Union representing the Co-op’s hourly employees.Through thoughtful and diligent negotiations, the Co-op was able to maintain fully paid single medical coverage for all full-time employees which affect the majority of City Market employees. For part-time employees, 65% of the single medical premium is paid. The Co-op medical benefits exceed those offered by competitors and other area employers according to the 2008 Hickok & Boardman benefits survey. The Co-op also plans to provide a three percent wage increase to employees and profit sharing based on quarterly sales growth.“I would like to acknowledge the fine work by the Co-op staff in continuing to control costs,” said Clem Nilan, Co-op General Manager. “It’s the combination of sales and cost control that provides the wherewithal to maintain health benefits and provide pay increases… when other businesses are seeing layoffs and cuts in benefits.”In addition to healthcare, a wage increase and profit sharing, the Co-op also offers generous paid time off, a six percent match (dollar for dollar) 401 (k) plan after one year of employment, store discounts, and much more.“City Market continues to demonstrate its commitment to the wellbeing of our employees by exercising financial prudence, while at the same time providing access to a comprehensive benefits plan,” said Nilan. “This recent contract renewal reaffirms our commitment to our employees and to the community.”The new Profit Sharing plan proposed by Co-op management will provide employees with a share in enhanced earnings if sales growth exceeds projections. For more information on employment and a detailed list of employment benefits at City Market visit www.CityMarket.coop(link is external).About City Market/Onion River Co-opThe Onion River Co-op is a consumer cooperative grocery store, with over 4000 members, selling wholesome food and other products while building a vibrant and healthy community, all in a sustainable manner. Over 60 cents out of every dollar spent at City Market stays in the Vermont economy. Located in beautiful downtown Burlington, City Market provides the area’s largest selection of local, natural and conventional foods, and over 1,700 Vermont-made products. City Market also features over 140 green products from cleaning solutions to canvas shopping bags. Visit City Market/Onion River Co-op online at www.CityMarket.coop(link is external) or call 802-861-9700.last_img read more

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SOUTHCOM Participated with Partner Nations in Tradewinds 2015

first_imgAnd in September 2008, the U.S. government sent humanitarian aid to Haiti worth $19.5 million to assist victims of four weather-related disasters — tropical storms Fay and Hanna, and hurricanes Gustav and Ike — that left 328 dead and 114,000 homeless. Furthermore, a U.S. naval vessel, the USS Kearsarge, delivered to Haiti approximately 466 metric tons of emergency food, and approximately 5,867 liters of water. “In the end, the training exercises among naval forces allow for greater cooperation to deal with new threats and lead to better public relations between allied countries in the region,” Oliva Posada said. Exchanging knowledge and experience The Tradewinds exercises support the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI), created in 2010, under which the United States donated $263 million in equipment and training against traffic in weapons and drugs in the region. The training also enables the Armed Forces from different nations to develop protocols that will give them more efficient and quicker responses, in addition to learning the different methods traffickers use to smuggle drug shipments from South America to major areas in Central America and the Caribbean. By Dialogo June 30, 2015 For example, after the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, U.S. forces mobilized close to 20,000 troops as well as Coast Guard cutters, U.S. Navy ships, and dozens of aircraft to offer aid to Haiti, according to information from SOUTHCOM. During that mission, they delivered thousands of tons of food and water, and provided medical attention. SOUTHCOM worked with local and international authorities to meet the need over the long term. Caribbean Basin Security Initiative “The primary benefits to the navies are to work in a coordinated manner, establish confidence protocols in the exchange of information codes, getting to know other Naval forces, and developing technology applied to a military career, such that they can anticipate and, in the event of a crisis, react immediately and in an organized fashion,” Oliva Posada said. “I recently came from doing special duties, and I have only been in the military for a little over a year, [so the Tradewinds exercises are] something I always wanted to do,” said Private Victor Adana, an infantryman with the Belize Defence Force. “My favorite part was the close quarters battle training. A lot of it I had done before but never with so many other countries. In the beginning we all had so many ways of doing things and as the training went on we all seemed to adapt to one universal way, and that is something I’ll never forget.” Other countries that participated in Tradewinds 2015 included the Caribbean countries of Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, in addition to Mexico and the United Kingdom. Indeed, Tradewinds 2015 benefited from broad international participation. About 1,350 U.S. service members joined in the combined exercises; the U.S. Coast Guard, together with U.S. Navy units, have participated in training programs with Navies from partner nations for 31 years. Additionally, during the ground portion of the exercises, Marines from Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force-Southern Command (SPMAGTF-SC), 2d Law Enforcement Battalion, along with the Canadian Army, conducted subject matter expert exchanges with other partner nation militaries on techniques in marksmanship and weapons handling skills, security operations in jungle and riverine environments, military support to law enforcement, and command and control. center_img Through Tradewinds and similar operations, SOUTHCOM helps strengthen interoperability in Caribbean countries and works with partner nations to develop responses to natural disasters and humanitarian crises, and to fight against transnational organized crime, said Javier Oliva Posada, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Tradewinds is a joint and combined annual exercise that takes place at various locations in the Caribbean and involves the region’s navies, maritime security corps, and Coast Guards. Several Caribbean countries, as well as Mexico, Canada, and the United States, are participating in Phase II of the Tradewinds 2015 maritime Military training initiative coordinated by the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) in Belize. The goal of the program is to strengthen regional cooperation in complex, multinational security operations, including humanitarian and rescue missions. “It’s important for the partner nations to work together because in today’s environment no country does it alone,” said Lieutenant Colonel David Hudak, commanding officer of Special Purpose-Marine Air Ground Task Force, SOUTHCOM. “The countries face similar challenges and if they are working together the better they can be in combating those challenges and the major challenges in this region are the trafficking of drugs weapons and human trafficking.” The second, which culminated in Belize, took place from June 15-24 and focused on maritime and land operations. In particular, it focused on the exchange of knowledge and experiences to strengthen capabilities in weapons handling, sharpshooting techniques, security operations in riverside and rainforest environments, as well as Military support for law enforcement forces, the use of non-lethal arms, crime scene investigation, jungle survival skills, martial arts, maritime operations, and scuba diving skills. “Tradewinds offers an opportunity to develop and strengthen our alliances and helps all participants protect their national security,” said U.S. Marine Corps General John F. Kelly, commander of SOUTHCOM. Extensive training During the exercises, officials use tools such as radar systems, go-fast boats, light weaponry (30mm machine guns), saltwater-resistant standard weapons, and special equipment to approach and board the type of boats traditionally used by organized crime and turbine artillery helicopters used to pursue vessels, according to Daniel Pou, an assistant analyst and researcher at the Latin American School of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in the Dominican Republic. The U.S. government has worked in close cooperation with the region’s countries to cooperate on humanitarian and disaster assistance initiatives in recent years. The first phase of Tradewinds 2015, from May 30-June 9, began on the island of St. Kitts and Nevis and covered maritime security and disasters. Participants evaluated the mechanisms for response and coordination in the event of a catastrophe through theory, practice, and training simulations in security, allowing service members to improve their ability to respond. last_img read more

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Arneson makes like lightning in bolt to Legendary IMCA Modified checkers

first_imgAs the white flag waved, Berry broke and Thornton inherited the second position. Casey Arneson passed the two-time and defending race winner for the runner-up spot on the last lap.  “I’ve raced all over the country with the biggest names in the Modified division,” said Arneson, who took the checkers in front of a number of those drivers. “Winning the race was pretty exciting, but what was even more exciting was running 1-2 with my brother.”  Ricky Thornton Jr., Hunter Marriott and Lucas Schott rounded out the top five. Dakota Classic Modified Tour champion Tom Berry ran second most of the way before breaking late. Arneson pulled away from the rest of the field on the restart, again seeing Berry catch up in traffic.  He’ll join younger brother Casey, runner-up in both the Legendary and Thursday’s Kupper Chevrolet Dakota Classic Tour finale at Mandan, on the All-Star ballot. Feature results – 1. Austin Arneson, Fargo; 2. Casey Arneson, Fargo; 3. Ricky Thornton Jr., Adel, Iowa; 4. Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo.; 5. Lucas Schott, Chatfield, Minn.; 6. Jason Hughes, Watts, Okla.; 7. Joel Rust, Grundy Center, Iowa; 8. Travis Hagen, Williston; 9. Tanner Black, Otis, Kan.; 10. Jason Wolla, Ray; 11. Dylan Goplen, Fargo; 12. Troy Cordes, Dunkerton; 13. Kody Scholpp, Estevan, Sask.; 14. Jacob Bleess, Chatfield, Minn.; 15. Alex Stanford, Chowchilla, Calif.; 16. Marlyn Seidler, Underwood; 17. Jeff Taylor, Cave City, Ark.; 18. Brad Hartigan, Dickinson; 19. Matt Aukland, Glyndon, Minn.; 20. Shawn Strand, Mandan; 21. Myles Tomlinson, Turtle Lake; 22. Jesse Skalicky, Fargo; 23. Billy Kendall, Baxter; 24. Travis Ulmer, Mandan; 25. Marcus Tomlinson, Turtle Lake; 26. John Corell, Jamestown; 27. Jon Plowman, Woodbine, Iowa; 28. Tom Berry Jr., Newburg; 29. Robert Hellebust, Minot; 30. Spencer Wilson, Minot; 31. Mark Dahl, Bismarck; 32. Tracy Domagala, Bismarck; 33. Tyler Hall, Fertile, Minn. The 33-car main event field was represented by drivers from seven states and Saskatchewan.  Arneson quickly distanced himself from the field and was into traffic before the 10th circuit was scored. Berry closed in and the front two battled for the lead while negotiating lapped cars but Arneson held on to the top spot.  After the initial green flag was delayed by a light rain shower and work on the racing surface, Arneson started outside Joel Rust on the front row.  A caution regrouped the field on lap 23, which also happened to be the random point near halfway that officials picked before the race for a five-minute intermission. “Before we got to lapped traffic, I ran the middle to high side,” Arneson said. “Then I went all over the place, high, middle, diving down low to get through. It was a lot of fun.”  Austin Arneson led all 40 laps to earn $10,004, plus the $500 halfway leader’s bonus, for winning the Corral Sales Legendary at Dacotah Speedway. The IMCA Modified victory also put Arneson on the ballot for the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational. (Photo by Layn Mudder) MANDAN, N.D. (July 12) – Austin Arneson was almost as fast as the lightning on the horizon Friday night at Dacotah Speedway. That was also the point when the decision was made to cut the length of the race by 10 laps due to lightning near in the area and threatening weather  Arneson led all 40 laps of the fourth Corral Sales Legendary main event, earning a career-best $10,004 payday, a $500 bonus as the leader at midway and a berth on the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot.last_img read more

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Chris Paul, sensational and selfless, credits Clippers defense

first_imgThere was a lot of talk about Chris Paul following his performance in the Clippers’ 117-107 victory at Sacramento on Friday night. For good reason.He was banged up coming in — forearm bruise, tight calf — and he got poked in the eye in the second quarter. Yet he scored 40 points, doled out 13 assists and grabbed eight rebounds in 36 marvelous, turnover-free minutes.Paul was quick to point out it was the third-quarter defense that propelled his team to victory. The Clippers trailed 67-64 at halftime, then outscored the Kings 34-16 in the third, during which the Clippers (38-20) went on a 20-0 run.“It was defense,” said Paul, whose team hosts the Brooklyn Nets at 7:30 p.m. Monday at Staples Center. “It was straight defense. Me and DJ (DeAndre Jordan) talked about it at halftime. We had to set the tone, so I tried to start picking up DC (Darren Collison) earlier, not just letting him be in a rocking chair, picking us apart. I think they started feeling us a little bit more in the third quarter and that sort of fed our offense.” Rebounding from bad lossThe Clippers were coming off Wednesday’s unlikely 87-81 loss to the Denver Nuggets, who will not be making the playoffs. Even though Sacramento (24-33) is going to be hard-pressed to make the postseason, Clippers coach Doc Rivers liked the way his team responded.“Yeah, I don’t think they like to lose,” Rivers said of his players. “I don’t think it’s harder than that. It’s nothing that I’m doing. This is a very competitive group. They like each other. They play together.“They don’t like losing and they certainly didn’t like losing the game the other night and we felt like at half time we were playing the same way. It was really up to them. It was no coaching adjustment, I can tell you that.”Karl praises Clippers The Clippers average 105 points, which is seventh-best in the league. Kings coach George Karl believes the Clippers are better than that.“Offensively, they’re in the top two or three best offensive teams I’ve seen in the NBA,” he said. “I think Golden State is one, maybe the team on Monday night (Oklahoma City) might be two and Clippers might be three.“We did some good things, they just got a point guard (Paul) that had control of the game and conceptually we switched some and the switch didn’t work.”This and thatRecently acquired Jeff Green played his fourth game for the Clippers since coming over from Memphis for Lance Stephenson and a future draft pick. Green scored 22 points on 9-of-13 shooting and grabbed five rebounds. He started in place of Paul Pierce, who missed the game for personal reasons. … Brooklyn took a record of 16-42 — second-worst in the East — into its game Saturday at Utah. The Nets defeated the woeful Phoenix Suns 116-106 on Thursday.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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