All Good Records Releases The Full “Freshly Baked” Compilation

first_imgPart of the bliss of being GRiZ is spreading the good word of his fellow musical companions. His own All Good Records successfully brings together the talents of a future generation of stars to celebrate the progress of all genres. After some built up anticipation, the newest drop is the ‘Freshly Baked’ Vol. 1 featuring ten up-and-coming producers of varying styles hand picked by GRiZ and served to you fresh (and for free download). After rolling out singles by Marshall McGee, Birocratic, Ganja White Night, and Recess, the full compilation is finally here.If you are a fan of GRiZ, then you will inevitably be a fan of his fellow music-makers. So turn this up. Loud.last_img read more

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The New Mastersounds’ Eddie Roberts Talks Standing Rock & Social Responsibility Of A Musician

first_imgLast week, The New Mastersounds donated half of their recent show proceeds to the Stand With Standing Rock cause. The donation was the direct result of encountering the tragic situation firsthand, witnessing law enforcement training with riot gear in the parking lot of their Minnesota hotel. Not wanting to stand idly by, guitarist Eddie Roberts goes in depth about the decision, and the fine line between musician and social commentator in this new editorial.“Shut up and play!” Does today’s musician have a role in social and political commentary?In an age where everyone with a smart phone is sharing and commenting on their political viewpoints, is it right that a musician with thousands of followers does the same thing, or is that an abuse of influence?‘Politics v Humanitarian’I am very careful about what I post on social media, and I make a clear distinction between my personal, artist, and band pages. I am very careful not to force my political or religious viewpoints onto the band’s social media. For example, I would share a Bernie Sanders story on my personal page, but not The New Mastersounds page. It’s not my place to speak on behalf of the whole band on a political matter.The simple reason is, not all the members of the band share my views. However, when the band unanimously agrees on a point, we consider speaking out.Last week, we made a stand against the Dakota Access Pipeline, and here’s why:  Firstly, we all agree what is going on at Standing Rock is a humanitarian issue, not a political one. We value freedom of speech and the right to peacefully protest, and we do not condone the use of excessive violence against anyone who exercises those rights.Secondly, again, this situation is not political. This is corporatism, where oil investment is being valued over human life, where profit is being valued over people. The fact that Trump has a huge stake in the pipeline, and that Obama has done little to speak out about it, shows the situation is not politically motivated. Both sides are in it for the money.A third point is that we, as a band, are free to do whatever we want with our money. In the same way the ticket-buying public doesn’t get to choose what food we buy, we don’t need the consent of the ticket-buying public to donate our money from our shows. That being said, of the thousands of views, likes, shares and positive comments on our Standing Rock post, I only saw two negative comments. One said, “Thanks for the empty gesture,” and the other literally said, “Shut up and just play music. I give U money to hear music, not politics.” I could counter that with, “Shut up and listen.” What gives this person more right to comment than I do? The last time I checked, paying us to play music doesn’t confer the right to censor our opinions. I’m not a performing monkey.“I don’t care about your politics”When it comes to my personal page, I share and say whatever I please, because it is that, a personal page, the same as anyone else’s. If someone were to comment questioning my right to share my personal views because I am “just a musician”, then I would politely point out that they are on the wrong page, and should be following my artist page instead of my personal one. Obviously, not all my friends share the exact same views as me, but we all have the right to discuss our opinions with each other, as friends.Social responsibilityAs musicians, we have dedicated ourselves to a way of life. We have a vocation, and we can’t really separate ourselves, the music we make, or our opinions and viewpoints. It’s all one thing. And, as musicians, do we not have a social responsibility anyway? There is a long tradition of music’s involvement in politics and social issues: anti-war commentary, Live Aid-style fundraising for famines caused by war and foreign policy, black civil rights, women’s rights, etc. Does anyone look back on Jimi Hendrix and say, “How dare he comment on the Vietnam War?” No. He’s remembered as an important voice for peace in that time. Was that the case at the time? Or is it just looking back, when we see the right and wrong side of history? I think we’d all agree the majority of musicians take a liberal, left-wing standpoint. Is this because we’re in the business of spreading Love and Joy, not Hate and Fear?One last question I’d like to raise is: In this current climate, are less people likely to attend a show if it’s billed as a fundraiser? My personal experience with The Payback* suggests this is so, that it’s a hindrance for a show to be advertised as a benefit. For some reason, there is lower attendance at the shows I’ve organized as fundraisers than there is for my regular shows, even when the benefit shows are piled high with coveted guests and receive much more press coverage.Why is this? Have benefit shows become a victim of cynicism?  “Where does the money really go? How much of it actually gets donated? Is this just a publicity stunt?” If it was a show you’d normally go to see, does it matter where the profit goes? Are you actively against the benefiting principal, or are you just sick of being told what you should care about? Should it be up to the musicians to divert the profit they make, either to their own pockets or to a non-profit they choose? Do you ask your bank where it invests your money? Most often, benefits are not even politically motivated, and they benefit humanitarian, non-partisan organizations. Homelessness isn’t politics. Standing Rock isn’t politics. They are by products of corporate-driven policies.Helping our fellow man is humanitarian, and personally, I won’t just shut up and play!*For more information about The Payback, Eddie’s Non-profit organization that raises money through concerts for urban homeless families with children and young adults, please head here.For a donation to Standing Rock, head here.Catch Eddie Roberts and The New Mastersounds crew this Friday, December 2nd at Terminal 5 alongside the funk army Turkuaz! Details here.[Photo Credit: Tony Dellacioppa]last_img read more

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Listen To Holly Bowling’s Set At Brooklyn Comes Alive, Featuring Elise Testone

first_imgHolly Bowling is a classically trained pianist who began playing piano at the age of five. There’s one major distinction, however, that separates her from other similarly studied musicians. That is Holly’s devotion to the legendary rock band Phish. The past year has seen Holly expand her repertoire into the realm of the Grateful Dead. Using classical piano technique to reinterpret these jam band luminaries, Holly’s live performances infuse new with old, tradition with surreal, and creates a concert experience like nothing else in the music world.Bowling performed at Brooklyn Comes Alive in October, for the second year in a row, during The Hall at MP‘s brunch hours of the long-lasting, music-filled day in Williamsburg, New York. The pianist played through Phish and Grateful Dead classics, and welcomed vocalist Elise Testone for her debut of “Sugaree.” You can listen to the full audio below:Setlist: Holly Bowling | Brooklyn Comes Alive | The Hall at MP, Brooklyn NY | 10/22/16Set: The Curtain With, Row Jimmy, A Song I Heard The Ocean Sing -> Bird Song -> Piper * ->Terrapin Station Suite ** -> The Other One *** -> Cryptical Envelopment -> Squirming Coil, Sugaree #$# first time performed by Holly* w/ ASIHTOS Mashup** w/ Bird Song tease*** w/ Terrapin Mashup$ w/ Elise Testone on vocalsThe 2017 Brooklyn Comes Alive lineup features members of Umphrey’s McGee, moe., The Disco Biscuits, The String Cheese Incident, Trey Anastasio Band, and so many more. Iconic legends, such as John Scofield, George Porter Jr., Cyril Neville, DJ Premier, Johnny Vidacovich, and Henry Butler, will join members of nationally touring bands, such as GRAMMY-winners Snarky Puppy, The Meters, Primus, Soulive, Lettuce, The Motet, Lotus, Railroad Earth, The Infamous Stringdusters,Yonder Mountain String Band, The Russ Liquid Test, SunSquabi, Pendulum, Destroid, The Crystal Method, Midnight North, Aqueous, Kung Fu, Electric Beethoven, and more. Check out the full lineup of artists below, and stay tuned for upcoming announcements about bands, supergroup formations, and special tribute sets.***Tickets Are On Sale Now!***Each ticket grants attendees in-and-out access to all three venues, creating the feeling of an indoor music festival all within the heart of Williamsburg. In true Brooklyn Comes Alive-fashion, a brunch set will kick off the music each day, and performances will continue into the early hours of the morning with special late-night performances.To find out more about ticketing, VIP options, and lodging, head to the festival website.last_img read more

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Marco Benevento Welcomes Scott Metzger And More In Brooklyn Bowl Performance [Gallery]

first_imgLast night, Marco Benevento brought his solo band to Brooklyn Bowl for a whimsical performance. The show featured support from WOLF!, the solo project of Benevento’s Joe Russo’s Almost Dead bandmate Scott Metzger. The Brooklyn Bowl faithful came out in droves for the performance, showing love to two musicians that are no strangers to the Williamsburg venue.After WOLF!, Benevento took the stage with his skilled and charismatic trio featuring drummer Andy Borger and 22-year old bass phenom Karina Rykman. The band ran through a suite of songs from Benevento’s The Story Of Fred Short, before welcoming Metzger on guitar for a sing-along “At The Show” encore.You can view a gallery of photos from the performance below, courtesy of photographer Andrew O’Brien.Benevento and his band are back in action on February 7th at The Hollow in Albany, NY. You can also catch him with Joe Russo for a rare Benevento/Russo Duo show at Brooklyn Bowl later this month. For a full list of upcoming Marco Benevento solo dates, visit his website. Load remaining images Marco Benevento w/ WOLF! | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 2/2/17last_img read more

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Amazon To Produce New Grateful Dead Biographical TV Series Written By “Straight Out Of Compton” Screenwriter

first_imgIt’s been well documented on this site and others that the long-awaited Grateful Dead documentary Long Strange Trip will be released to the masses on Amazon on May 26th. But according to a report in Deadline, that’s not the only Dead content the streaming company has brewing–Also in the works, say sources: a biographical TV series that will be written by Jonathan Herman, Academy Award-nominated screenwriter of N.W.A. biopic Straight Outta Compton. After getting the Best Original Screenplay nomination for Compton, Herman adapted the Chris Pavone novel The Travelers, and wrote the script for Universal Studios‘ upcoming remake of gangster classic Scarface.According the Deadline report, “Herman will adapt the untitled series based on Home Before Daylight: My Life On The Road With The Grateful Dead, the memoir by longtime Grateful Dead roadie Steve Parish. That will fuel a series whose ambition is to capture the long-running phenomenon that is The Grateful Dead, a band of musical misfits who came of age during the apex of the 1960s San Francisco counter-culture movement.”Grateful Dead guitarist Bob Weir will serve as an executive producer on the project (alongside Parish and others), and will curate all of the music for the series.The name and release timeframe for the new project are both as of yet unannounced.[h/t – Deadline]last_img read more

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Phish Shares Pro-Shot “Carini” From Dick’s

first_imgPhish is now two-thirds done with their 7th Labor Day Weekend run at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, CO. Phish loves Dick’s, and Trey Anastasio, Jon Fishman, Mike Gordon, and Page McConnell always treat the run accordingly, serving up setlist hijinks and, most importantly, consistently incredible improvisation. Night One was strong, serving up a 5-set second set, with “No Men In No Man’s Land > Carini > Ghost > Harry Hood > Cavern.”The “Carini” offered the second 20+ minute improvisational odyssey of the set, following NMINML. After a brief “vocal jam” on the song’s first “lumpy head” line, the band kept things dark and murky where many great “Carinis” of late have eventually found their way into blissful major-key territory. Laser-like effects laced the extended jam, which hinted at a resolution to major space before Mike took the reigns and led the outfit back into dark, minor-key weirdness. Trey took the band on his back from there, piloting the ship to the biggest, most euphoric peak of the night to that point before settling into a “Have Mercy”-like reggae groove (with faint hints of “Manteca”) that finally relented into the opening notes of “Ghost.”Phish Announces Dick’s Webcast And Free Sunday StreamThe band has shared pro-shot video of “Carini,” which you can watch below:Tonight’s Phish stream is free, and will be available of Phish’s Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube channel.SETLIST: Phish | Dick’s Sporting Goods Park | Commerce City, CO | 9/1/17 SET 1: Blaze On, 555, Breath and Burning, Theme From the Bottom > Free, Tube > Roggae > MoreSET 2: No Men In No Man’s Land > Carini > Ghost > Harry Hood > CavernENCORE: The Horse > Silent in the Morning > Character Zero[photo by Jeremy Scott]last_img read more

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Return Of The Space Cowboy: Why Jamiroquai Playing The U.S. Has Everybody On Cloud 9

first_imgPioneering British electro-funk titans Jamiroquai have not played a concert in America since 2005, and it’s been a decade since bandleader Jay Kay told the media he planned to quit music to focus on flying helicopters and finding his future baby-mama. In the interim, an entire generation of American fans has been denied the glory that is Jamiroquai live, wishing and wondering whether they would ever experience the majesty of this music in concert on U.S. soil. Beginning with last spring’s promising comeback album Automaton, Jamiroquai has inched closer and closer to a stateside return, with hardcore American fans chomping at the bit as the band tore up festivals and stadiums the world over. On the newest record, we learned that Jay Kay found his soulmate and started a family, he’s accumulated a myriad of sportscars, flown quite a few choppers as well; transmitting from aboard Cloud 9, the enigmatic singer has made it clear the band is ready to make up for lost time. Heavily hinted at since Automaton‘s release, it seems our collective prayers have finally been answered, with no less than five highly anticipated appearances scheduled for this side of the Atlantic. After so many years of stateside silence, it’s high time to delve into why Jamiroquai’s return to the U.S. is getting so much buzz across the interwebs. Please enjoy this detailed dive into the Way-Back Machine, a personalized primer on the band as we run down their historical relevance, and celebrate Jamiroquai’s return to the United States with a deafening roar.“Just Another Story” – Montreux Jazz 1995[Video: Zsolt Horváth]Jamiroquai’s sonic styles and funky aesthetics have found their way into pop music, modern funk, electronic, and even inform jam band trends too. From STS9 to The Motet, Deep Banana Blackout, The Main Squeeze, Turkuaz, or even Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Jamiroquai has inspired and influenced generations of jam culture with a patented brand of jazzy, soul-fueled, organic dance music. Over the course of their lengthy absence, one can hear Jamiroquai’s direct influence on U.S. radio, be it Bruno Mars or Daft Punk, both Grammy-winning recording artists that owe a debt in substance and gratitude to the path Jamiroquai blazed. Millennial heroes Tyler the Creator, Anderson .Paak, Chance the Rapper, and The Internet have all publicly championed them in the press and on stage, putting the quasi-forgotten band’s name back in lights. The name Jamiroquai blends the concept of a “jam-session” with the tribe of Iroquois, as singer Jay Kay assembled a musically-tight and socially-aware ensemble that came of age in the Acid-Jazz era of early 90’s Britain. This band of badasses rode in on bubonic basslines, classic funk drum breaks, DJ cuts, a raucous horn section, and spirited vocal deliveries from a magnetic, charismatic frontman. Breaking in behind the success of their peers Brand New Heavies, Sony Music won a bidding war for Jamiroquai’s services, and the label would release the band’s prolific output over the next decade. Tokyo, Ebisu 1995[Video: TiagoVarejao]Kicking down the door in late 1992 with a demonstrative debut single “When You Gonna Learn?”, Jamiroquai was instantly impossible to categorize or quantify. 1993’s debut LP Emergency on Planet Earth was an anachronism in the culture, a vibrant fusion funk drawing on obvious influences like Stevie Wonder and more obscure inspirations such as Gil Scott Heron. Jamiroquai was born of the acid jazz/acid house revolution. They uncorked marathon sessions that fit right into English dance music culture, and built up a dedicated, vocal following. Jamiroquai were nothing if not innovative, even as the rock press slagged them early on for their retrofitted stylings.After the band made a sharp impression with Emergency, vocalist/B-Boy/bandleader Jay Kay recruited young bassist-extraordinaire Stuart Zender to join founder/keyboardist Toby Smith. The three would synchronize as the foundation for the group’s finest era and offerings. From within Smith’s sublime songwriting and riveting Rhodes work, Kay mined the Zen to unleash his torrent of torrid lyrical exercises; soul-drenched soprano that walked the spectrum from falsetto to croon, plus a dash of hip-hop swagger to boot. Crystallized versions of “Hooked Up” and “Too Young To Die” show an unprecedented range and attack, as Jay Kay made his presence felt and heard with frenzied displays of vocal gymnastics to match the band’s machine-gun funk workouts. Their sophomore album and crowning jewel, 1994’s The Return of Space Cowboy, is a smoked-out celebration of all things funk, soul, jazz, trip-hop, and a prototype for the sonic gumbo we lovingly call “jam”. Zender’s virtuosic bass lines glide atop the pulsating drums of newly recruited beat-machine Derrick McKenzie, amid horn blasts and record scratches, the didjeridoo reverberated from the furious jamming styles. All-world percussionist Sola Akingbola joined the fray, mixing tribal riddims with elements of reggae, afrobeat, and dub. Wallis Buchanan delivered the patented didjeridoo jams—at the time, it was a calling card for the band’s unmistakable sound—as was (the then-innovative) onstage turntablist DJ D-Zire, who cut up vinyl with the group in real time. “Journey to Arnhemland” is fantastic voyage in shanti-bass long before that sound ever made it to Burning Man, while the grandiose beauty of the title track remains stunning nearly twenty-five years on.Jay Kay’s wild capoeira-infused, B-Boy dance routines accompanied the band’s kaleidoscopic adventuring, and his persona became a crucial element of the band’s performances. Despite clearly paying homage to their forefathers, Jamiroquai rewrote the rulebook for what’s possible from a live funk band. Have a listen to live takes on “Mr. Moon”, “Light Years” and later “High Times” from the classic lineup/era. The group organically blossomed into a veritable jamband, without ever plugging into the burgeoning scene that was simultaneously taking shape across the Atlantic (it’s safe to say they were not even aware that there was such a scene in the States). They had an improv-heavy set that rotated tunes frequently, took off on wayward explorations, and never seemed to play a song just exactly the same way twice.Phoenix Festival 1997[Video: pablotronix]With three full-length LPs and five years of steady gigging across Europe and beyond, Jamiroquai had established themselves as underground kings on the global come-up, with more commercial success directly in their path. “Virtual Insanity,” from 1996’s wildly-popular Travelling Without Moving, saw the band achieve multi-platinum sales and international acclaim for their groundbreaking single and accompanying music video. With it came big egos, interpersonal disputes, MTV awards, and their first world tour, which brought them to the US for a series of theater dates.  They were on every radio station and television talk circuit, on every club’s soundsystem, and booming out of every car stereo; Jamiroquai was ubiquitous in 1997. This particular space and time is widely considered to be the band at its absolute zenith, and the music speaks for itself. Peep the timeless bounce of anthem “Alright”, the translucent romance of “Cosmic Girl”, tribalized mayhem juxtaposed with salacious R&B on “Use the Force“, the Caucasian cannabis skank of “Driftin Along”, the ungodly funk and fury of “High Times”, and Travelling Without Moving‘s title track. This material was a clear evolution from the first two albums, with Jamiroquai diversifying bonds and dropping mad bombs that continued to defy genre.The classic era of Jamiroquai came to a close when Stuart Zender left the band acrimoniously in 1998; Traveling Without Moving was sadly the last record for this particular lineup, and the band’s trademark sound continued to evolve as the personnel changed. A new era was cemented with the release of 1999’s Synkronized, a departure in more ways than one. This album aesthetically turned a corner with futuristic elements and textures, fully embracing new technology, electronic music, drum machines, sampling. This approach was met with mixed reviews from longtime funkateers, as Nick Fyffe replaced Zender but did little to help fans forget the beloved young bassist. Twenty years on, the music on Synkronized remains ahead of its time, which is nothing if not the Jamiroquai brand.  Synkronized lacked the jazzy explorations of earlier work but broke new ground (“Butterfly“, “King for a Day”), and placed a laser focus on the electronic dance idiom (“Planet Home”, “Supersonic”). The embryonic seeds for what the U.S. labeled “jamtronica” were flourishing across the pond, as Jamiroquai barrelled in on the year 2000. Milan 2001[Video: The Tribe with the Vibe]Wallis Buchanan and the didj jams were phased out on 2001’s criminally underrated A Funk Odyssey, which would also be keyboardist/founding member Toby Smith’s last recording with the band. (Smith would sadly pass away last April after a lengthy illness; his contributions to Jamiroquai will live on forever.) In spite of an evolution away from their organic roots, the funk returned in a major way as advertised. A Funk Odyssey explored even more realms of dance music culture (“You Give Me Something”, “Little L”, “Twenty Zero One”), with the band utilizing fabrics native to house, nu-disco, and even techno during yet another sonic reinvention. With the exception of “Black Crow”, which lamented the absence of spirituality in society, Kay began to shy away from overtly socially conscious lyrics. Conversely, their music and messages became far more accessible and universal as they matured.The songwriting on AFO was pared down into simpler arrangements, but the hooks became meatier, the choruses more anthemic. Club culture was always alive and well inside of Jamiroquai, but by 2002 it had moved to the forefront; much as the jam community in the U.S. was gravitating to electronic stylings. There was (and remains) a deep divide between old-school fans of the Zender/Toby-helmed acid jazz/groove era, and younger Jamiro-freaks who were introduced to the band’s more modern sounds by way of club remixes and tastemaker DJs. A Funk Odyssey is the proverbial tipping point of this discussion, and if I may humbly opine, the last truly great Jamiroquai album.From the turn of the millennium, things began to trend in the wrong direction for Jamiroquai in the United States. Look no further than their show at Hammerstein Ballroom in NYC on September 10, 2001. After the tragic events of 9/11, Jamiroquai’s U.S. promo tour was aborted, and the band returned to England after only one show.  Synkronized single “Canned Heat” was curiously reborn into American culture, getting featured in the slapstick comedy film Napolean Dynamite. This newfound zeitgeist was coupled with the unrelated Dynamite LP, released to little fanfare in 2005. As a result, Jamiroquai became interminably linked with that movie’s unabashed silliness (the scene is hilarious, after all); by proxy, the band devolved into somewhat of a tongue-in-cheek punchline for a generation of music fans. Instead of being seen through the prism of innovation and eclecticism as they should, fans were turning up at their shows wearing “Vote for Pedro” tee shirts. Verona 2002[Video: JamiroquaiVEVO]In late 2005, a seemingly under-the-radar mini-tour of North America featured a slew of new band members, including the tremendous bassist Paul Turner (Annie Lennox) and keyboardist Matt Johnson, the latter becoming Jay Kay’s principal songwriting partner. The pair joined guitarist Rob Harris, who’d quickly become a trusty asset to Jay Kay with his sharp and dynamic attack. Longtime members Akingbola and McKenzie round out the band’s modern core lineup that tours to this day. The new band acquired some long overdue mojo, and Jamiroquai set about tearing up packed houses in the fall of 2005. The quick tour saw the invigorated crew destroying rooms from Atlantic City to Chicago, Los Angeles to two sold-out engagements at midtown Manhattan’s Best Buy Theater. Walking out of that magnificent show into the blustery New York night, the feel-good vibes were fleeting. As he left the stage, Jay promised a return in March of 2006; now we know that 2005 theater run would be the last time that Jamiroquai set foot in the United States (or Canada for that matter) for thirteen long, agonizing years. Those of us who were lucky enough to have tasted the magic of live Jamiroquai up through 2005 have longed for what might have been. Trapped in funk purgatory, it felt like a stillness in time. Chicago 2005[Video: TiagoVarejao]In the interim, Jay Kay and company toyed with the idea of quitting music altogether, coming together in 2010 to record the largely-forgettable Rock Dust Light Star, an album that never even saw proper release in the States for nearly two years. “White Knuckle Ride” and “She’s a Fast Persuader” stuck out from the bunch, but for the most part, fans were left wanting. Getting ignored like that can certainly explain the lack of touring over here, yet the band did numerous support dates around the world.  Year after year, Jamiroquai would play a select assortment of high-profile concerts in soccer stadiums globally, dotting their itinerary with exclusive and expensive private engagements for the world’s elite. Their global popularity never waned, it was American’s fickle tastes that always did; Jamiroquai played concerts of all sizes and varieties around the world while the United States was denied the privilege. Yet a glimmer of hope remained.U.S. tour dates seemed more and more unlikely as time wore on, a distant dream deferred, would the space cowboy ever return? That haze finally lifted with 2017’s encouraging cosmic reboot, as Automaton proved the crew had more than a little petro left in their tank. The most striking additions are the fantastic “Cosmic Babes”- Valerie Etienne, Lorraine McIntosh, and Elle Cato provide mesmerizing, shimmering backing vocals that act as a sizzling foil for the frontman. Harris and Turner specifically have proven to shine in this era, and Johnson’s arsenal of keyboards creates a wall of sound. Despite the lack of horns, the new material is a gigantic leap toward the stars. The first album in seven years is chock-full of dancefloor burners ready for the stage. Slabs on slabs of disco-fueled bass grooves, walls of analog synth, bombastic electro-beats, and the trademark Jay Kay attitude–all of it a bit more mature, and trading in sophistication.The kickoff “Shake it On” was born to open a concert, it’s thunderous bottom-end, sexy clavinet, and rump-shaking funk is the ultimate proclamation: We’re baaaaack!  “Dr. Buzz” is the band doing their best intergalactic Steely Dan, “Cloud 9” continues in a tradition we’ve come to love; while the title track, and stutter-step smooth “Vitamin” offer a glimpse into the mad future. For the first time in several albums, some authentic throwback hip-hop grooves come to the surface within the park jam “Nights Out in the Jungle“. We can only hope that “Nights” and “Vitamin” find their way onto the stage when the band finally returns to the States.After hinting at the possibility throughout 2017, Jamiroquai finally announced that they would indeed be returning to the USA several times in 2018. With five dates unveiled, the band carefully curated a concert slate with two appearances at Coachella in April and stand-alone shows at San Francisco’s Bill Graham Civic Auditorium (April 17th) and New York City’s Forrest Hills Stadium (September 8th). Quite possibly the most earth-shattering news of all, on Friday Jamiroquai was revealed as a headliner for the sixth annual Suwannee Hulaween, in a stealthy official video featuring the Jamiroquai “Buffalo Man”—subtle but undeniable proof that Jay Kay and his band will appear at the legendary Spirit of Suwannee Music Park this fall. Jamiroquai is without question “the ultimate get” for any festival.  I’ll go out on a limb and say that this is the most exciting book in Suwannee Hulaween’s already-storied history. Being intimately familiar with the Hulaween magic, and having caught this band on each of their four US tours (1997, 1999, 2001, 2005), I can unequivocally declare that Jamiroquai at Suwannee Hulaween is nothing short of a match made in heaven. The HULA community and Suwannee River are brimming with the type of vibrant energy that is tailor-made for a Jamiroquai dance party. The festival cuts a wide swath between traditional jamband vibes and psychedelic electronic music; that is quite specifically Jamiroquai’s DNA, and they are the quintessential band to unite the HULA clans. Manifest destiny, indeed.The cat in the hat is finally back! Do you know where I’m comin’ from? Jamiroquai’s triumphant return to the United States is virtual insanity, your opportunity to scratch the bucket list proper. The Automaton tour has been one scorcher after the next. Who knows if they will ever come back to this corner of the earth again? It’s been thirteen long-ass years of drifting along, so we can only implore you to use the force, shake it on, and come out to the funktion!  Coachella. The Bay. The City. HULA! We’ll see you on the dance floor, with canned heat in our heels!   Viña 2018[Video: saldanaca]words: B.GetzSpecial Thanks to @JamiroFan2000 and Jamiroquai-The JamilyIn Loving Memory of Toby Smithlast_img read more

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Aqueous Releases Genre-Spanning New Record, “Color Wheel” [Listen]

first_imgToday, Buffalo-based groove rock quartet Aqueous released their newest studio album, Color Wheel. The new album, the band’s first full-length studio effort since 2014’s Cycles, was recorded at Goo Goo Dolls bassist Robby Takac‘s GCR Audio in Buffalo, NY, the band’s hometown.The band explores hip-hop, progressive rock, and jazz influences in this newest release, which features a collaboration with the Turkuaz Horns on “Weight Of The World”, a song we’ve seen in Aqueous’ live rotation.The record was written and produced by the band, but this time they took a new approach – “Seventy percent of the songs were written weeks or even days before we went into the studio, so there weren’t many preconceived notions going in this time, which made it pretty exciting,” shares guitarist Mike Gantzer in a press release.“The general concept was kind of a critique or analysis of our habits as humans with the Internet right now,” Gantzer continued in a recent interview with Billboard. “For me, a color wheel represents a palette of emotions. So we were looking at how we present this perfect version of ourselves on the Internet; We set out to make a cookie cutter version of our life that’s really idealized, but that does not represent at all the emotional complexities of a person’s life – the color wheel of different emotions.”Listen to Aqueous’ newest release, Color Wheel, in full below:In support of the new record, Aqueous will also embark on their most extensive headlining tour to date. Find a full list of dates below with more information available via the band’s website.last_img read more

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Iggy Pop And John Varvatos Are Producing A Docuseries About Punk For Epix

first_imgEpix has greenlit an upcoming docuseries chronicling the original punk scene that bombarded commercial music starting in the late 1970s, and the influence the rowdy genre had on pop culture at large. The show will be appropriately titled Punk and is being directed by Jesse James Miller, with Stooges singer Iggy Pop and rock fashion designer John Varvatos coming on as executive producers.  The series will provide punk fans and curious onlookers with rare and never-before-seen photos, grainy archival footage from the genre’s underground days, and a soundtrack featuring a mix of both well-known hits and misses. Pop and Varvatos have also rounded up an impressive list of musicians who will give insight and opinions on what they remember of the punk scene through new interviews. Artists who will appear on the show include Johnny Rotten of Sex Pistols; Marky Ramone of the Ramones; Debbie Harry and Chris Stein of Blondie; Duff McKagan of Guns N’ Roses; Wayne Kramer of MC5; Jello Biafra of Dead Kennedys; Flea of Red Hot Chili Peppers; And Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters.Industry executives who will also be featured throughout the series include former Stooges and Ramones manager Danny Fields, Punk Magazine co-founder Legs McNeil, and Wayne’s World director Penelope Spheeris. “Exploring and reliving the history of punk has been an absolute labor of love for me,” Varvatos added in a statement. “Punk’s ability to transcend generations in its culture, music, and style is a story that needs to be told. So…Hey Ho Let’s Go!!”Varvatos’ main area of expertise is within the fashion industry, but he has worked alongside artists ranging from Gary Clark Jr. to Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page to help bridge the two creative worlds. Iggy Pop has never produced a television series, but he has made notable appearances in front of the camera throughout his career, including a memorable 2015 episode of “Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown.” The 71-year-old rocker recently co-headlined Dave Grohl’s CalJam rock festival back in October. The series is currently in production and will include four total episodes, according to its show page on IMDB. Punk will arrive on Epix next spring when it debuts on March 11th at 10 p.m. EST.[H/T Deadline]last_img read more

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Tedeschi Trucks Band Plays Through The News Of Kofi Burbridge’s Passing With Live Debut Of New Record [Audio/Video]

first_imgTedeschi Trucks Band played their first of two nights at the Warner Theatre in Washington, DC on Friday night. About an hour before the show, the band learned that their forever keyboardist/flutist Kofi Burbridge passed away. Kofi had been on medical leave this year following recurring heart complications, and renowned keyboardist Gabe Dixon has been touring in 2019 in his place.Rest In Peace, Kofi BurbridgeIt’s been an insanely rough couple of years for Tedeschi Trucks Band, and yesterday marked their triumphant comeback with the release of SIGNS, marking their first record since 2016’s Let Me Get By. The extended period of time between albums was a result of the major losses experienced by the band over the last several years. During the recording process, the group lost several of their mentors: Leon Russell, Col. Bruce Hampton, and Derek Trucks’ uncle and original Allman Brothers Band drummer, Butch Trucks, followed by Gregg Allman later that year.As the band noted in a press release, “Signs confronts loss, heartbreak, and politically troubled times with a credence and conviction that puts the group’s undying world-class musicianship and collaborative spirit on full display. It’s a genre-defying collection that runs the gamut from uplifting soulful anthems to bittersweet ballads and driving rock and roll.”To celebrate the new record’s release, the band performed the entire album live for the first time ever, with the exception of the emotional closing track, “The Ending”, about Col. Bruce Hampton‘s mysterious death (listen immediately if you haven’t already). Following the 10-song surprise, the band continued with original favorites “Don’t Know What It Means”, “Bound For Glory”, “Midnight In Harlem”, “Part Of Me”, and “The Storm”. For the encore, they returned for the only covers of the night, Little Milton‘s “More and More” and Joe Cocker‘s “Space Captain”.In the video below, you can see the band members console one another with their instruments during the parts of “Space Captain” when Kofi would traditionally take his solos. An emotional evening, indeed.“Space Captain”[Video: Vinny Allen]You can also listen to the full show below, courtesy of vwmule.[Audio: vwmule]Tedeschi Trucks Band returns to the stage tonight before heading on to Hershey Theatre in Hershey, PA. For a full list of upcoming dates, head to the band’s website.Setlist: Tedeschi Trucks Band | Warner Theatre | Washington, DC | 2/15/19Signs, High Times, I’m Gonna Be There, When Will I Begin, Walk Through This Life, Strengthen What Remains, Still Your Mind, Hard Case, Shame, All The World, They Don’t Shine, Don’t Know What It Means, Bound For Glory, Midnight In Harlem, Part Of Me, The StormE: More and More, Space Captainlast_img read more

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