UGA entomology fellow Olivia Smith

first_imgFollowing the onset of several major outbreaks of foodborne pathogens traced back to wildlife, buyers of farm-fresh produce began encouraging the removal of natural habitats and nesting areas on farms to discourage wildlife intrusion.  As this tactic became a preventative measure targeted at limiting farmland contamination due to wildlife presence, Olivia Smith, a postdoctoral researcher in the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, began to focus her research on identifying the food safety risks posed by wild birds due to agricultural intensification — examining the various relationships between farming practices, land-use practices around farms and crop contamination by birds.With populations of birds already rapidly declining due to repercussions from agricultural intensification, this solution is particularly problematic because farmland remains an important habitat for many species of birds.“Birds provide important insect pest control services to sustainable farmers, so removing birds makes it harder for these farmers to farm without pesticides,” said Smith. “Therefore, it is extremely important to understand how much of a problem birds are likely to be for food safety and how we might reduce that risk.”With foodborne illness remaining a major concern in the U.S. and abroad, this in-depth research is important for harmonizing food production and wildlife conservation, while preserving the general health of consumers around the globe. Despite widespread fear that birds are a major cause of foodborne illness, Smith’s studies showed only one conclusive study linking foodborne illness back to birds.“One of the greatest challenges of our time is to figure out how to feed 8 billion people while supporting a healthy environment for future generations,” said Smith. “Bird populations have been rapidly declining, with an estimated 3 billion birds lost over the last several decades. Meanwhile, a growing body of research has shown that biodiversity provides important pest control services to farmers. Thus, it is timely and imperative to understand how to best comanage conservation, food production and food safety.”Smith’s findings, which were published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, suggest that these natural habitats around farms should be preserved, as they may be beneficial for both food safety and wildlife conservation efforts, despite current recommendations for promoting food safety within the industry.“We began the research to understand how much of a problem birds are likely to be for food safety for small-scale, organic farmers and how farm management and land use surrounding a farm impact that risk,” said Smith, who works with Department of Entomology Professor Bill Snyder. “It is extremely important to understand the risk wild birds pose to food safety for several reasons.”Beginning in April 2016, Smith began accumulating hundreds of hours of data collection and collaborating with researchers across the country to prepare a manuscript for publication. Her leadership and dedication to the project garnered praise from Snyder, who served as co-senior author to the paper.“Olivia entirely led the field research that the paper reports, and also all stages of data analysis and manuscript preparation,” said Snyder. “Her project was challenging because it included an interdisciplinary team of researchers spread all across the country, yet she enthusiastically took on the challenge to herd this big group of cats. Her remarkable success in publishing her work is proof of just how effective she was as a team leader.”Snyder echoed the importance of Smith’s study and the impact it will have on the food production industry and wildlife worldwide.“Wildlife is thought to be a key threat to food safety, which has led to pressure for growers to remove natural habitats from their farms,” said Snyder. “Olivia has made a major contribution by showing the natural habitats on farms are the solution to, rather than the cause of, food safety threats posed by wild birds. This is because diversified farms attract the native bird species least likely to spread human pathogens. So, Olivia has shown that there is no conflict between food safety and bird conservation — quite the opposite, as the two actually go hand in hand.”Through her work, Smith hopes to inspire a younger generation of researchers and students to keep moving forward even when times get tough.“Carrying out a research project from start to finish comes with many challenges, but dedication and commitment will get you through to the end,” said Smith. “It is important to have confidence and push forth with your ideas.”A native of southeastern Michigan, Smith earned her bachelor of science in biology from Siena Heights University in 2013, a master of science in fisheries and wildlife from The Ohio State University in 2015, and a doctorate in biology from Washington State University in December 2019.To learn more about the UGA Department of Entomology, visit ent.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Fishing on Long Island: From the Ocean to Your Plate

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York THE FISHERMANA hand-rolled cigarette in one hand, a can of beer in the other, Ross Michael sits shirtless, sunning his tattoos aboard the Miste Rose docked at the commercial fishermen’s pier just inside the mouth of Montauk Harbor, and watching the competition unload at the neighboring fish market. It’s a well-earned break for the dreadlocked 36-year-old who, unlike the grizzled old seadogs a few slips away, isn’t so wary of outsiders he won’t share a few fish stories. “It’s really good money,” he says, recalling months-long, deep-sea so-called “long-line” voyages. “It’s not Deadliest Catch, but we work really, really hard. We work crazy hours and break our backs.” As if catching sea bass and konch for money didn’t make him a living relic of Long Island’s oldest profession—a feat not uncommon in these parts—he works for a crew that is one of only three lobster boats left on The End. The Greenwich, Conn., native is hopeful the species is rebounding and scoffs at the lobster-hungry Hamptonites with no clue how hard the crustaceans are to catch. “Never trust the first pot,” he says, quoting his captain, Ace, referring to the traps with which they catch their pincher-clad livelihood. “Either you get nothing, or you get a lot.”THE SEAFOOD BROKERUpwards of 15,000 pounds of fish daily pass through Asa Gosman’s family’s wholesale fish market. A member of the storied Gosman clan who run a cluster of Montauk shops and restaurants where Irish brogues are often overheard, he speaks proudly of the biggest operation in the heart of New York State’s largest commercial fishing port, explaining how the work days start at the crack of dawn and run long, same as those of his suppliers. “There’s more fish here than anywhere else,” says Gosman, 36, noting how the geography turned this community into a working museum of the Island’s fishing industry. “Where you have bodies of water meeting, you’re gonna have more fish.” Much has changed since the family business was established here seven decades ago. “Montauk’s gotten a lot busier and the consumer’s gotten a lot more demanding…Chefs have gotten more creative with their dishes.” From here, hundreds of restaurants are kept in stock with fresh seafood. Every day a company delivery truck filled with fish makes a roundtrip drive to New York City, 120 miles each way. “We try to specialize in local fish, but we also sell everything,” he says. “If you look at somebody’s menu, they’re gonna have 10 or 15 different seafood items. Half will be local, half will be from somewhere else.”THE COOKAmid a strip of trendy restaurants drawing tourists to uptown Montauk sits The Dock, the local pub where out-of-towners mingle with fishermen docked outside while Theresa “TD” Dettori cooks some of the freshest seafood found this side of the Shinnecock Inlet. They’re known for their tuna melt: grilled tuna steak with cheese on an English muffin. Their seafood supplier, Gosman’s, is right next door, and some of the fishermen who supply their wholesaler are regulars here. One of them was Frank Mundus, the legendary shark fisherman who was the inspiration for Captain Quint in Jaws. “I actually opened Mick Jagger’s clams,” says Dettori, 54, with a smile that belies how hot it is working in a kitchen in the summer heat. The Rolling Stones frontman and his band spent time here in the ’70s, jamming at Andy Warhol’s beach house, writing songs—Memory Motel downtown inspired one. “Back in the old days, we used to get a lot of long-liners from Down South, and they’re a pretty rough crowd,” she says. “They don’t really come to Montauk anymore.” She glances across the bar at the familiar faces she’s gotten to know in her 35 years here. “These people are here probably six days a week, if not seven,” she says. “Same people, same seats, same routine.”THE PATRONSSeated with their two young sons at The Dock during happy hour are Andrea and Orhan Saraylil of Westchester, a young family celebrating their annual pilgrimage to Montauk by ordering some freshly caught dinner from the sea. “I’ve never seen anything like it,” Andrea says of the grilled tuna melt, which The Dock claims to have invented. In between cutting up a grilled cheese for the two toddlers—well-behaved kids who don’t invoke one of the bar’s rules: “Take screaming children outside”—Orhan, a banker, says: “I don’t think I would have gotten this if it weren’t right here,” gesturing to his view of the fishermen’s pier. Asked why they drove to the farthest-flung outpost of LI, Andrea says it was a split verdict. “The beach, the food, I guess that’s why,” she says, noting ironically while this reporter interrupts her dinner that the lack of media attention is also a draw. “It’s very low-key, I feel very comfortable.”last_img read more

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Stivers cites CUNA payday rule concerns during FSGG vote

first_imgAs the U.S. House considers the Financial Services and General Government (FSGG) Appropriations Act of 2016 (H.R. 5485), Rep. Steve Stivers (R-Ohio) referenced CUNA’s letter outlining concerns with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) short-term, small-dollar loan proposal. Stivers referenced CUNA’s letter in connection with an amendment to the FSGG bill that would delay the rule’s implementation.“The Independent Community Bankers of America and the Credit Union National Association recently wrote to the CFPB to voice their strong opposition to this rule, they fear that this rule will force them out of the short-term credit market and stop them from serving millions of consumers across our country,” Stivers said.The CFPB released its proposal last month, and CUNA is concerned about the effect it could have on a number of consumer-friendly credit union products. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Spain reopens border as Latin America cases pass two million

first_img‘Like zoo animals’ Although the spread has slowed in Europe, it remains the worst-affected continent with more than 2.5 million cases.Spain has been among Europe’s hardest-hit nations, but on Sunday it lifted a slew of restrictions in a bid to get its tourism industry back up and running. As well as opening its land border with France, Spain also welcomed EU nationals, those from the passport-free Schengen zone and Britons at seaports and airports — without enforcing quarantine periods.Around 100 flights from European countries landed at Spain’s airports, operator AENA told AFP Sunday. “We must remain on our guard and strictly follow hygiene and protection measures,” Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said on Saturday, stressing that the danger has not passed.In the Netherlands, police clashed with protesters frustrated over the government’s coronavirus response and made dozens of arrests in center of The Hague.Police said the protest, attended by hundreds, was peaceful until a group of football fans clashed with riot police at the nearby Central Station, throwing stones and bottles.In France, millions of children were preparing to return to school on Monday after three months away, and cinemas and theatres were also getting set to reopen.On Sunday, France celebrated its annual music festival marking the summer solstice, with bands playing in cafes, restaurants and on streets across the country.In Germany however, concert halls and other institutions still face an uncertain future with social distancing rules forcing them to slash their events calendars and drastically reduce capacities.  On the eastern fringes of Europe, cases have spiked again in Azerbaijan, forcing the government to institute another lockdown — much to the irritation of local workers.  “The government again cages us in like zoo animals and gives not a damn for the consequences,” taxi driver Shahin Mamedkuliyev told AFP.Saudi Arabia on Sunday ended its coronavirus curfew, lifting restrictions on businesses including hair salons and cinemas, despite a spike in infections.It also reopened its mosques in Mecca, Islam’s holiest city, after a three-month shutdown.But international flights and religious pilgrimages remain suspended and the authorities have not yet said whether they will proceed with this year’s hajj, scheduled for the end of July. There was no such joy in Latin America, however, where grim records kept on tumbling. Brazil is the second worst-affected country with almost 50,000 deaths and more than one million cases, helping to push Latin America’s total infections beyond the two million mark, according to an AFP tally early on Sunday.The spread of the virus is accelerating in the region, with Mexico the second hardest-hit country followed by Peru and Chile. Clusters have also emerged in the Palestinian territories, Morocco and Iran, where officials have now registered more than 100 deaths a day for three days running.  Spain reopened its borders on Sunday, a significant stage in Europe’s gradual reopening after its battle against the coronavirus, as infections in Latin America surged past two million. Traffic flowed again across the Spain-France border in a watershed moment for the millions of businesses and workers across Europe that have suffered badly from the economic downturn caused by tough lockdowns.”We wanted to be in Spain for the sun, the beach, tapas, and I’m already wearing my swimsuit under my clothes,” said Frenchwoman Sylvia Faust, who crossed into Spain with her 17-year-old daughter. Trump’s testing boastThe United States is the worst-hit country overall and continues to post the second-highest daily death figures.Nevertheless, President Donald Trump held his first campaign rally in months on Saturday, inviting thousands to an arena in Oklahoma — although there were many empty seats. He told the crowd how he had instructed his team to slow the rate of testing to reduce the number of registered cases. “When you do testing to that extent, you are going to find more people, you will find more cases,” he said, even as six members of his advance team tested positive for COVID-19. Trump is attempting to kickstart his campaign for re-election in November during an outbreak that has killed 120,000 and clocked up more than 2.2 million cases, and with the economy tanking. Scientists are still learning about the virus, its symptoms and the way it spreads — and a vaccine still remains a distant possibility.The World Health Organization has warned that lockdowns and other restrictions are still the best way to control the spread and urged people not to become fatigued with stay-at-home measures. center_img Beijing is also battling a new outbreak which has so far registered just over 200 cases. The authorities have taken more than two million samples to test and banned imports of chicken from an American producer, suspecting the virus could have been imported in contaminated food.COVID-19 has now killed more than 460,000 people and infected almost nine million worldwide.  Topics :last_img read more

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Cairns real estate: Luxury home in surprise suburb

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:50Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:50 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenExperts 2020 property predictions02:50A STUNNING home has come on the market in a suburb not usually known for luxury properties.Colliers International Cairns agents Stacey and Tom Quaid put the Edmonton house on the market earlier this month with a $1.8 million price tag.Mr Quaid said the attention to detail and amount spent on making the five-bedroom, four-bathroom house “something special” would wow anyone who inspected it. 3-5 Melchiori Close, EdmontonHe said the find was evidence there were “unexpected gems” in areas not typically known for sprawling, high-end pads.“Take, for example, 2-4 Hibiscus Lane at Holloways Beach which sold for $4 million last year – who would have thought something of that calibre would be hidden away there? 3-5 Melchiori Close is a similar hidden gem,” Mr Quaid said.“This house is on elevated acreage, with city and ocean views and impeccable fit-outs and finishes, and all on a single level of living, which is rare and pretty keenly sought after by buyers in this price range. 3-5 Melchiori Close, Edmonton“Located in an area better known for old cane fields and more traditional low-set acreage with a horse or two, this property presents a private, elevated position offering a sweeping drive up to an architecturally designed grand residence that has had no expense spared in its planning or execution.”The home also has polished timber floors matched to tiles, ample glass to allow in natural light, and a resort-style pool that looks like it’s from the pages of a glossy magazine.More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms2 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns2 days ago 3-5 Melchiori Cl, EdmontonMr Quaid said the master bedroom was one of the “best executed I have come across”.“It has its own views and private deck access to a stunning ensuite and an enviable walk-in closet with incredible use of space,” he said.Privacy could also play into the property’s appeal given its “non-traditional location”.Homes on Kewarra St, Kewarra Beach, The Peak in Brinsmead or Nolan St in Whitfield are well-known for their high-value homes.last_img read more

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Three men slashed and killed in Barbados following domestic disputes

first_img 56 Views   no discussions NewsRegional Three men slashed and killed in Barbados following domestic disputes by: – March 27, 2012 Share Tweet Sharecenter_img Share Sharing is caring! BRIDGETOWN, Barbados – Three men were stabbed to death in less than 24 hours following separate domestic disputes incidents between Friday afternoon and the early hours of Saturday morning.Barbados police question two, and remain on the hunt for a third suspect.And, police are today questioning a woman and a man in connection with two of those incidents, and are looking for a third man in connection with the last incident.Dead are Mr. Sylvan Trotman, 55, of Sanford, St. Philip, Mr. Macolm Husbands, 45, of 2nd Avenue, Welchman Hall, St. Thomas and Mr. James Jackman, 45, of Greenfields, The City.The bloody period started on Friday afternoon when Mr. Trotman received multiple stab wounds on Friday around 4 p.m. following an altercation with a relative. He was rushed to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital where he later died. The relative, a man, is said to be in police custody.By 9 p.m. police were called to the murder scene of Mr. Jackman who died following a domestic dispute with his female friend at his home. That woman is also now in police custody assisting with that investigation.And, by 5 a.m. lawmen were looking at the body of Mr. Husbands whose throat was cut by an assailant after he opened the door of his home to see who threw a rock through his window. His female friend who was in the house at the time was also attacked. Their attacker fled the scene but has since been apprehended by police.Investigations into the three murders are continuing. Caribbean 360 Newslast_img read more

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Stock Car regional crown puts Westin Abbey in IMCA history book

first_imgAfter back-to-back rookie of the year campaigns, Westin Abbey (left) was champion of the EQ Cylinder Heads Southern Region for IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars. He is pictured with IMCA President Brett Root.  (Photo by Bruce Badgley, Motorsports Photography)COMANCHE, Texas – After earning rookie of the year awards each of the last two seasons, Westin Abbey took the logical step up in 2016.The 16-year-old from Comanche, Texas, became the youngest driver to win a regional IMCA championship, topping the EQ Cylinder Heads Southern Region for IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars.Abbey, the youngest of four brothers to have made names for themselves on Lone Star State dirt ovals, won 14 of his 54 starts this season. He was eighth in the national points race with Boyd Raceway track and Allstar Performance State championships to his credit.“We didn’t plan on racing for points but we got caught up in it,” said Abbey, a junior at Comanche High School. “The second year of experience really made a big difference.”The regional Hobby Stock rookie of the year in 2014, Abbey had won three features in his first Stock Car campaign. He won six straight times between June 4 and June 24 this season.“This was a great year. It was pretty cool to win 14 times compared to last year,” said Abbey, also first to the checkers in the post-point season Showdown special at Kennedale Speedway Park.His three older brothers are best known for their Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center success, Steven as a rookie of the year, Dean as a two-time national champion and Jeffrey as this year’s national and IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s champion.Westin, however, won’t be making the switch to an open-wheeled division in the near future.“I like the Hobby Stock and the Stock Car better. The Stock Car races smoother than a SportMod. It just handles way different,” Abbey stated. “I drove a SportMod in the middle of the year and didn’t like it as much.”He usually traveled with Jeffrey – they won features on the same night seven times this year – and Abbey is looking forward to his second Super Nationals.“This year was the first time I’d ever been to Super Nationals and it was a lot of fun, even with all the rain,” he said. “It was fun being one of the faster cars there.”Starts: 54Wins: 14Additional Top Fives: 23 HIS CREW: Father Randy and brothers Dean and Jeffrey.HIS SPONSORS: Abbey Racing of Comanche; TM Racing of Keller; Swenson Shocks of San Antonio; 517 Designs of Whitney; Tumbleweed BarBQue of Stephenville; KS Engineering of Albert Lea, Minn.; and Dynamic Drivelines of Des Moines, Iowa.last_img read more

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Kicker Hofrichter impresses Syracuse coaches, hopes to contribute right away in 2015

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ In practice, Armwood (Fla.) High School’s offense was on one side of the field, and the defense was on the other.Kicker Sterling Hofrichter had to stand near midfield to kick field goals over the offense. Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer and quarterbacks coach Tim Lester were in attendance, and saw him make a field goal upward of 55 yards.Ever since then he’s been SU’s top kicking target.“Coach Shafer saw that and I guess he was really impressed,” Hofrichter said. “They want me, and that was basically what got me.”Hofrichter was the only kicker that Syracuse wanted for its Class of 2015. SU was the only school that gave him an offer. And on Friday the two made the pairing all but official when Hofrichter announced his verbal commitment to the Orange, becoming the 16th verbal commitment to Syracuse’s Class of 2015.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHe is listed as 5 feet, 10 inches and is a two-star recruit, according to Scout.com. He will finish his senior year at Armwood High School before coming to Syracuse.“I was hoping I’d get a scholarship to a big-time Division I school,” Hofrichter said. “It’s a great feeling to go D-I and go to an (Atlantic Coast Conference) school.”Hofrichter figures to have a good chance to get immediate playing time at Syracuse.Both Ross Krautman and Riley Dixon will have graduated. Ryan Norton will be a senior, but he only made 10-of-15 field goals last season, his longest kick measuring at 44 yards. Incoming freshman Evan Jakubowski, a preferred walk-on, will likely be Hofrichter’s other competition.Said Hofrichter: “I’m just going to continue putting in hard work, show how accurate and how consistent I can be and hopefully I can get a spot as a freshman.” Comments Related Stories Kicker Hofrichter commits to SyracuseSyracuse snags 3-star safety Fredrick’s commitmentcenter_img Published on June 28, 2014 at 3:48 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3last_img read more

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No. 4 Syracuse tops No. 6 Stanford, 2-1, in overtime

first_img Published on August 28, 2015 at 9:50 pm Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TR No. 4 Syracuse (1-0) went on the road to No. 6 Stanford (0-1) and captured a 2-1 victory in overtime.In the match’s 84th minute, Syracuse’s Laura Hurff shot her corner in front of the net. A scramble ensued. Shots by Emma Russell and Roos Weers were stopped by Stanford goalie Dulcie Davies, who denied 11 Syracuse attempts Friday. But the next attempt, by Emma Lamison at 83:25, wasn’t blocked. Her game-ending goal gave Syracuse the win. It was Lamison’s first career goal for the Orange after the junior transferred from Northeastern for the 2015 season.Though Davies stopped Weers’ shot in overtime, the Syracuse sophomore had also scored her first career goal for the Orange — the first of the team’s season — in the contest’s eighth minute when she put home a pass from Alma Fenne. Weers was also assessed a yellow card during the second half.Senior goalie Jess Jecko, who made four saves in the game, allowed her first goal of the season in the second half when Stanford’s Maddie Secco tied the game at 1-1, which is where it stood until the end of regulation.Despite the deadlock, the Orange dominated in shots. At the end of the first half, shots were 17-4 in SU’s favor. In the overtime period, the Orange continued dominating in that aspect, garnering five chances before Lamison found the back of the net.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse also held a significant advantage in corners (16-1) over Stanford. The Cardinal took its only corner in the first half, while Syracuse took three in the 13 minutes of overtime alone.The Orange stay in Stanford, California for its next game against University of California Davis at 7 p.m. on Aug. 29. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Trotter making his mark in Borland’s absence

first_imgJen SmallWhen redshirt senior linebacker Chris Borland went down with a right hamstring injury in the first quarter against Illinois Oct. 19, Wisconsin already had built a commanding 21-0 lead over the ailing Illini.Through one quarter of play, Wisconsin had allowed zero points and showed no signs of slowing.In other words, Borland’s replacement for the rest of the game didn’t need to be perfect. He just needed to play well enough to prevent the Illini from climbing back into the game.Enter redshirt junior linebacker Marcus Trotter.In the three quarters that followed, the Wisconsin defense would loosen up somewhat without it’s leader on the field — Illinois managed to put 32 points on the scoreboard before the game was done — but Trotter didn’t disappoint his teammates or the Wisconsin fans who made the four-hour drive to Champaign, Ill.On the night, Trotter would lead the defense with nine tackles — four more than his season total at that point — and even managed to grab a fumble recovery.For many college players without much game experience, being called to action at the drop of a hat would be considered a nightmare, but Trotter said a similar situation last year in which Borland was injured against Indiana helped prepare him mentally should the situation arise again.“The previous year against Indiana, the same thing happened,” Trotter said. “It was a really tight game. I think we were pulling away at the end of the third quarter, and Borland got hurt and I went in. I think that really prepared me for this year if that were to happen.”One week later, Trotter followed up his performance at Illinois with his first career start at Iowa Saturday. Again he led the team in tackles — again amassing nine over four quarters of play.With Trotter coming off the bench having seen little time on the field, redshirt senior linebacker Ethan Armstrong attributed the two-time academic all-Big Ten linebacker’s intelligence for the relatively seamless transition between Borland and Trotter.“His biggest strength is his head, his smartness,” Armstrong said. “His ability to read and recognize things and take it from the practice field into the game have really helped him.”Still, ask Trotter if he was pleased with either of his performances, and the conversation quickly changes direction. It’s not that he didn’t enjoy helping his team earn two back-to-back wins or leading the defense in tackles. But when you play backup to one of the best college inside linebackers in the country, the bar is set pretty high.“I’ve learned a lot from [Borland],” Trotter said. “Some of the things he can do, you can’t teach. Just to know that maybe someday I might get that same opportunity to lead the team is always good motivation to improve.”Escaping from the shadowsAnd yet, as Trotter finally begins to enter the weekly conversations of Badger fans across the country, his two weeks in the spotlight for Wisconsin almost didn’t happen.Four years ago, as a senior at Marquette High School in Milwaukee, Trotter was convinced that he would choose Minnesota on signing day. His brother, Michael, who had played with him at Marquette, had been getting more attention from colleges and had already decided on Wisconsin.That year, the Hilltoppers ran all over the Greater Metro Conference to the tune of a 14-0 record, with Michael getting most of the credit. If Marcus went to UW with him, he risked staying in his brother’s shadow yet again.“I don’t know why, but I thought it would be a good opportunity for me to go there and maybe try something new,” Trotter said.But when the day came, Marcus chose Wisconsin — eager to prove himself as a walk on.“Deep down in my heart, I knew I wanted to play with my brother,” Trotter said.Fast-forward through the first few years of both their college careers and things have gone how most observers would have expected. Michael went on to play in 25 games in the 2011 and 2012 season, starting three times. Meanwhile Marcus played sparingly in nine games.This year, however, things have been different.Through eight games this season, Marcus has played in five, including his lone start against Iowa on Nov. 2. Meanwhile, Michael has appeared in just 3 games.And yet, despite the competitive nature of their relationship, their bond as brothers runs even deeper. In fact, over the last two weeks, Michael claims he has become Marcus’ loudest, most obnoxious cheerleader.“I think if you would have filmed me during the game, you’d be like, ‘Wow, this guy is ridiculous,’ because every time he made a tackle I was really excited,” Michael said. “I’m Marcus’ biggest fan. …  It’s hard not to get antsy for him.”While Marcus’ days in the spotlight this season may soon be fading as Borland becomes healthy enough to play once again, both brothers have their eyes on a starting spot next year.Should their plans work out, the brothers hope to end their college football days in a similar fashion to their high school days: dominating the competition on their way to a conference title.“I think when the time comes that Marcus and I get to play on the field together again, it is going to be so much fun,” Michael said. “At Marquette senior year he made my job so easy … so I get excited thinking about us doing that again.”last_img read more

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