Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgTODAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for its weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept! will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.com. WEDNESDAY Sweet Talkers Toastmasters meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Wilsona School District board room, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Belly dancing classes, 7-9 p.m. at the Alpine Grange, 8650 E. Ave. T-8, Littlerock. Lessons: $2. Call (661) 944-1747. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com, or visit the Web site at www.geocities.com/littleangels_angelitos. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org THURSDAY High Desert Toastmasters meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at 1008 W. Ave. M-4, Palmdale. Call (661) 992-3229 or 944-1130. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 569 will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Grecian Isles Mobile Home Park, 4444 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-7672 or (661) 285-5003. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.com. FRIDAY Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Emotional Freedom Technique Group offers demonstrations and practices, 6:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends). Self-help tapping technique used to reduce or eliminate stress, cravings, pains, fears, phobias. Call (661) 945-4045. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting Course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.com or www.sava-na.org. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with panic attacks, anxiety or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, third floor. Call (661) 943-3956. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. last_img read more

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The Man Who Looked Into Facebook’s Soul

first_imgTags:#Analysis#Features#NYT#social networks#web Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Pulling Down the Facebook Social GraphNow Warden is about to unveil a much larger project along the same vein. For the past six months he’s been crawling public profile pages on Facebook. He now has more than 215 million of them indexed and updated about once a month. When he began he was using the Web crawling service 80legs, but over time he had to build his own crawling infrastructure. When I talked to him this afternoon, he had already begun uploading 100 GB of user data onto his server to make it available for academic research starting on Wednesday. Warden says he’s removed identifying profile URLs but kept names, locations, Fan page lists and partial Friends lists. All those fields of data are just waiting to be analyzed and cross referenced. That’s one very rich resource.Yesterday Warden posted some of his own initial observations from the data on his personal blog. Those included:In almost every state in the Southern U.S., God is number one most popular Fan page among Facebook users. Among people in the L.A., San Francisco and Nevada regions? “God hardly makes an appearance on the fan pages, but sports aren’t that popular either,” Warden writes. “Michael Jackson is a particular favorite, and San Francisco puts Barack Obama in the top spot.” In the Oregon and Idaho region? Starbucks is number one.In the Mormon-influenced areas of Utah and Eastern Idaho, the most popular Fan pages are The Book of Mormon, Glen Beck and the vampire book Twilight, which was authored by a Mormon.The bulk of Warden’s posted analysis yesterday was about location networks. People in the western U.S. tend to have Facebook friends all over the country; people in the southern U.S. tend to mostly be friends with people who have remained in the same area.Taking a Deeper LookThese observations are interesting, but they are only the beginning of what’s possible. Name, location, friends and interests are great data points to analyze. Warden has written a program that will estimate gender as well, based on names. All these data points can be cross-referenced with outside data, too. Members of Facebook’s own staff did this kind of analysis when they compared user last names to U.S. Census data, which allowed them to estimate changes in Facebook’s racial composition over time based on the likelihood of people with particular last names to report a particular racial backgrounds.“I’m mostly thinking ‘What do I try first?’,” Warden says. “There’s so many interesting ways to slice the data – especially as I’m starting to get changes over time. I’m also trying to map out political networks in aggregate; how polarized the fans of particular politicians are – so how likely a Sarah Palin fan is to have any friends who are fans of Obama, and how that varies with location too. One of my favorite results is that Texans are more likely to be fans of the Dallas Cowboys than God.”Warden says he hasn’t talked to anyone from Facebook since he started crawling the site, but he did get an email from someone on the security team asking him to take down instructions he’d posted that exposed a security hole that made harvesting peoples’ email addresses easy. So the company is paying attention. “I’d love to see them put me out of business by putting decent data out there,” Warden says. He says his Amazon Web Services bill was over $5,000 last month.Why is he indexing all this content and why is he going to hand it over to the academic world later this week? “I am fascinated by how we can build tools to understand our world and connect people based on all the data we’re just littering the Internet with,” Warden says. “Nobody thinks about how much valuable information they’re generating just by friending people and fanning pages. It’s like we’re constantly voting in a hundred different ways every day. And I’m a starry-eyed believer that we’ll be able to change the world for the better using that neglected information. It’s like an x-ray for the whole country – we can see all sorts of hidden details of who we’re friends with, where we live, what we like.”For a great example of the kind of social impact that data analysis can make, Warden points to some of the fascinating ways that GIS data is illuminating the intersection of race and public services. Data has shed light on social injustices for decades, and measurable information about the interactions of hundreds of millions of people every day on Facebook offers opportunities to discover both good and bad news about the contemporary human condition.Warden says he’s not yet been able to interest any investors in his ideas for businesses based on this data, so his girlfriend Liz Baumann, a former insurance actuary, stepped in to help and is now running much of the crawling. He says he’s now focused on “working on ways of presenting all this information in a form that answers questions for people willing to pay.” His first experiment along those lines is the very interesting FanPageAnalytics.com.What does Pete Warden hope for from this week’s public release of all this Facebook data? “Hopefully I’ll get to see a bunch of interesting [academic research] papers come out of it, worst case. And I’d like to be the guy people turn to when they need stuff like this.”Already well-respected among a fringe group of bleeding-edge geeks, we hope that Warden’s work on social graph analysis will end up impacting a far larger number of people than may ever know his name. Related Posts marshall kirkpatrick Youth social networking researcher danah boyd has observed that many people presume the way they use social networks is the way everyone uses them. “I interviewed gay men who thought Friendster was a gay dating site because all they saw were other gay men,” she says. “I interviewed teens who believed that everyone on MySpace was Christian because all of the profiles they saw contained biblical quotes. We all live in our own worlds with people who share our values and, with networked media, it’s often hard to see beyond that.” Now picture our perspective leaving our own experiences, zooming out and up until we can see how all the different groups are interacting on a worldwide social network. That bird’s-eye view could be both beautiful and horrible if the resolution was clear enough. That’s what a Ramen-eating, ex-Apple engineer named Pete Warden is about to release to the public this week.This Wednesday, Warden will make Friend, Fan page and name data from hundreds of millions of Facebook users available to the academic research community. It’s a move that Facebook has to have seen coming, a move that many in the data-centric community have been calling on the company itself to do for years, and an event that’s been complicated by Facebook’s recent privacy policy changes, which have muddied the waters of right and wrong but rendered even more data available for outside analysis.If what people call Web 2.0 was all about creating new technologies that made it easy for everyday people to publish their thoughts, social connections and activities, then the next stage of innovation online may be services like recommendations, self and group awareness, and other features made possible by software developers building on top of the huge mass of data that Web 2.0 made public. It’s a very exciting future, and Warden is about to fire one of the earliest big shots in that direction.Nerds in Space: Social Graph Analysis For Solving Large-Group ProblemsWarden studied Computer Vision in college in the U.K., then got into game development. After moving to L.A., he spent six years building graphics drivers for the original Playstation and the XBox. Then he started his own independent business, where, thankfully, he open-sourced much of his work (something he’s still doing today). When he found out that starting his own business wasn’t going to work with his immigration status, he was very fortunate to have also caught Apple’s eye with the software he had been releasing to the public. Apple bought his company in order to bring him on board. The proceeds of that small sale are now sustaining his next project after going independent again.After spending five years at Apple struggling to navigate the maze of people and connections and types of expertise in order to get the information he needed, Warden decided to go independent and build a company that solved exactly that kind of problem. “I can’t think of a better big company to work for, but it was still a big company,” he says. “It was hard to find the right people to talk to, whether for particular expertise or for contacts at external companies.” And so Warden left Apple to build a company that would use social graph analysis to solve problems like that. He called the company Mailana, a play on “mail analysis” since he was initially focused on email social graph analysis.We’ve written here a number of times about Mailana’s tool that analyzes the social graph of any Twitter user. Enter the username of someone on Twitter and Mailana will show you which 20 other people the user has exchanged the largest number of reciprocal public @ replies with. Find someone interesting or important? Mailana’s Twitter analyzer will tell you who they most regularly interact with. See, for example, The Inner Circles of 10 Geek Rockstars on Twitter. The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

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Naveen asks PM to make Kisan Scheme more inclusive

first_imgOdisha Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik on Monday wrote a letter to Prime Minister Narendra Modi requesting him to consider the inclusion of landless labourers, sharecroppers and vulnerable households under the PM Kisan Samman Nidhi Scheme. Welcoming the announcement of the new Central scheme for augmenting the income of farmers by providing support, Mr. Patnaik said that the inclusion of landless labourers, sharecroppers and vulnerable households will make the scheme more inclusive. In his letter, the Chief Minister brought to Mr. Modi’s notice that the Odisha government has rolled out the Krushak Assistance for Livelihood and Income Augmentation (KALIA) to further accelerate agricultural prosperity and reduce poverty in the State. “The KALIA scheme is progressive and inclusive,” he said. Mr. Patnaik informed Mr. Modi that the KALIA scheme covers 92% of the cultivators, sharecroppers (actual cultivators) and landless agricultural labourers in the State. “It (KALIA) recognises that livestock and fishery-based activities are key drivers of economic growth in rural areas particularly for landless households as the income from wage labour alone is not sufficient,” said Mr. Patnaik.Financial assistance The Chief Minister further said that the Odisha scheme also provides for financial assistance to vulnerable agricultural households who may not be able to take up cultivation or the livelihood activities due to various reasons. The scheme, rolled out in January, has created huge interest and response amongst the farming community of the State, said Mr. Patnaik. “It shall be our endeavour to ensure that all eligible beneficiaries are assisted under the scheme, so that no one who is eligible is left out,” he added. Reacting to the announcement of the PM scheme, Mr. Patnaik had said that it would have benefited the farmers more if the quantum of assistance was equal or more than the KALIA scheme which is ₹10,000 pa.last_img read more

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Amazing feeling: Virat Kohli thrilled after sweeping ICC awards to create history

first_imgVirat Kohli on Tuesday became the first cricketer in the history of the sport to win all three ICC Awards – Test Cricketer of the Years, ODI Cricketer of the Year and Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy for Cricketer of the Year.This is the second time in succession that he was named ODI Cricketer of the Year and Cricketer of the year while this is the first time he has bagged the Test Cricketer of the Year award.Last year Kohli had finished as the highest ODI scorer, collecting 1460 runs from 26 matches including six hundreds. He was also one of the leading scorers in Tests, accumulating 1059 runs from 10 matches including five hundreds.The 30-year-old bettered his performance in 2018 as he finished as the highest scorer in Test cricket with 1322 runs in 13 matches at an average of 55.08 with five hundreds and as many half-centuries while also finishing on top of the ODI runs tally with 1202 runs in 14 ODIs at 133.55 with six centuries.”It feels amazing. It’s a reward for all the hard work that you do throughout the calendar year. I feel really grateful and very, very happy with the team doing well at the same time myself performing. Having recognition at the global level from the ICC is something you feel proud of as a cricketer because you understand that there are many players playing the game.”To be rewarded in this manner from amongst all of them is obviously a very proud moment for me and something that gives you more motivation to keep repeating the same things because you have to keep the standard of cricket up and keep bringing in consistent performances. From that point of view, these awards give you that extra motivation,” Kohli said in a video message.advertisementICC Men’s Cricketer of the YearICC Men’s Test Cricketer of the YearICC Men’s ODI Cricketer of the YearCaptain of ICC Test Team of the YearCaptain of ICC Men’s ODI Team of the YearLet’s hear from the man himself, @imvKohli! #ICCAwards pic.twitter.com/3M2pxyC44nICC (@ICC) January 22, 2019Kohli was also rewarded for the way he captained Team India in both Tests and one-dayers after being named captain of both the Test and ODI Teams of 2018. This is again something which he has repeated after 2017.Kohli became the only Asian captain to win a Test match in South Africa (Johannesburg), England (Nottingham) and Australia (Adelaide & Melbourne) in the same calendar year (2018).With India’s 2-1 triumph in the Border-Gavaskar series, Kohli also became the first Indian captain to win a Test series in Australia in 71 years. India also bagged the ODI series 2-1 which was another first for the country in an ODI bilateral series Down Under.37 matches, 47 innings.2,735 runs at an average of 68.37.11 centuries, 9 fifties.What a year for @imvKohli! He wins the Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy for ICC Men’s Cricketer of the Year 2018!https://t.co/ROBg6RI4aQ#ICCAwards pic.twitter.com/oeSClhcfJQICC (@ICC) January 22, 2019Kohli, along with Jasprit Bumrah, were the only two cricketers to feature in the Test and ODI teams of the Year. Rishabh Pant was also named in the Test side while India vice-captain Rohit Sharma, Kohli, Bumrah and Kuldeep Yadav made it to the ODI side.last_img read more

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Jasprit Bumrah will be one of the stars of World Cup 2019: Wasim Akram

first_imgWasim Akram, R Ashwin and Harbhajan Singh are sure India pace ace Jasprit Bumrah will be one of the stars in World Cup 2019. Bumrah has been in top form over the last 2 years and was instrumental for Mumbai Indians in the 2019 Indian Premier League.Speaking at Salaam Cricket 2019, Wasim Akram said Bumrah had it in him to be one of the stars of the World Cup because he understands his bowling better than before.”Bumrah started his cricket career in front of me. He has an awkward action – he can get reverse swing too. He is young and he knows what bowling is.”He has now realised what he has to do. He bowled well in Test cricket in Australia and England. He will be the star of this World Cup – that’s for sure,” he said.India star R Ashwin said Jasprit Bumrah does not repeat his mistakes. He had bowled a no-ball which allowed Fakhar Zaman to score a match-winning hundred in the final of the Champions Trophy.”What separates Bumrah from the rest of the pack is that he can execute what he wants. When he bowled to Fakhar Zaman, he completely shut him down after his mistake in the Champions Trophy final. The confidence he has gained over the years is the biggest thing I have seen in him,” he said.Meanwhile, another star India off-spinner Harbhajan Singh reckoned Bumrah will have to play a major role if India were to win the World Cup.advertisement”If India have to win the World Cup, Bumrah will need to bowl really well. Bumrah will be the biggest factor if India have to win this World Cup,” he said.Jasprit Bumrah was sharp in both warm-up matches before the tournament got underway. Conditions in England so far suggest Bumrah will be lethal with his variations and pace.Also Read | Salaam Cricket 2019: Shane Warne picks his dream World Cup XIAlso Read | Salaam Cricket 2019: India’s bowling attack better than Pakistan, says Younis KhanAlso See:last_img read more

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a day ago​Arsenal hero Petit: Nothing has changed since Wenger left

first_img​Arsenal hero Petit: Nothing has changed since Wenger leftby Freddie Taylora day agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal legend Emmanuel Petit does not see any differences between the end of Arsene Wenger’s time at the club and their performances now.Unai Emery has received time and backing at the club, as he is now into his second season as manager.But their performances and results are no better than what Wenger was achieving, and Emery arguably has a more balanced squad at his disposal.Petit told reporters: “I can understand why many Arsenal supporters are losing patience with Unai Emery.”As a manager he has a bad record away from home – not just with Arsenal, but also while he was in Spain.”Arsenal showed no character and it p***es me off because it has been the case so many times away from home.”The starting XI he picked against Sheffield United was strange.”It’s difficult after an international break when you have to play teams that don’t have as many players involved in the international fixtures.”But you know what to expect when you go to Bramall Lane – you know the qualities of the Sheffield United team.”They fight, especially in front of their home crowd, and they get balls into the box and put pressure on at set pieces.”That’s what they did against Liverpool and Chelsea.”But more importantly they didn’t show any technical quality on the pitch.”They gave away so many simple balls and had no inspiration, imagination or creativity.”They looked so heavy. This isn’t Arsenal – you need to take the ball and show what you’ve got.”But I haven’t seen that in years. Nothing has changed since Arsène Wenger left.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Photos: Honeymooners Sporting Their Tux And Wedding Dress Are At Kentucky’s Game vs. South Carolina

first_imgHoneymooners in wedding tux and dress at Kentucky vs. South Carolina.It’s Valentine’s Day, so it’s fairly fitting that a recently married couple is attending Kentucky’s game against South Carolina at Rupp Arena this afternoon. The couple, which got married Friday night, is sitting in the upper section of the Wildcats’ arena, with the groom sporting his tuxedo and the bride still wearing her wedding dress. Check it out: Here’s our new favorite honeymooners sitting 1st row upper arena @Rupp_Arena after getting married last night pic.twitter.com/v6k9s9Bea5— Ryan Lemond (@ryanlemond) February 14, 2015There’s a bride at Rupp Arena today: pic.twitter.com/hmWR6RHcPx— Ashley Scoby (@AshleyScoby) February 14, 2015How grand is UK basketball? These fine Kentucky folks were just married in the Commonwealth’s church, Rupp Arena. #fb pic.twitter.com/1QwZNQMDOc— Benjamin Riggs (@bpriggs) February 14, 2015Woman in wedding dress watching basketball in second level of Rupp Arena. (Above A in Whitaker). pic.twitter.com/ZhmxF36x6Z— Brian Bennett (@BennettESPN) February 14, 2015Love and Basketball combine @Rupp_Arena for @KentuckyMBB vs South Carolina. #BBN #Bluelyweds pic.twitter.com/Na3HgVOs1C— KYwildcatsTV (@KYwildcatsTV) February 14, 2015Basketball, clearly, reigns supreme in the Bluegrass State. Kentucky and South Carolina are currently playing on ESPN.last_img read more

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Q&A: Former Ohio State Star DeVier Posey On His Time In Columbus, The NCAA, The CFL & More

first_imgDeVier Posey stiff arms a defender during a game with Ohio State.COLUMBUS, OH – SEPTEMBER 18: DeVier Posey #8 of the Ohio State Buckeyes stiff arms his brother Julian Posey #9 of the Ohio Bobcats at Ohio Stadium on September 18, 2010 in Columbus, Ohio. (Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)Football has brought DeVier Posey from his hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio, to suiting up for Ohio State, to various NFL stops and now North of the border. We caught up with Posey to discuss his career at OSU, what he’s up to now in the CFL and what the future looks like for him.The Spun: Let’s go back to the beginning. What was your recruiting process like coming out of high school? What approach did Ohio State take and what other schools were you considering?DeVier Posey: Oh man, you’re taking me back (laughter). It was an interesting process. I didn’t play varsity until my junior year, so I had more basketball offers and track interest up until that point. Then, I had a big junior year and was All-State. I followed that up by playing basketball and going to a few camps that year in the springtime. I ended up getting on the podium at the state (outdoor track) championships. I felt like coaches were always iffy about me until they figured out I was fast and played all these different sports.I had grown up liking Oklahoma and USC. Because of Reggie Bush, Jason White, Adrian Peterson, Carson Palmer and Matt Leinart and all those great receivers they had. I didn’t really know much about Ohio State growing up. I’m from Cincinnati but in Cincinnati we don’t really hear about Ohio State much. There was no social media. Either University of Cincinnati games were on, Miami (Ohio), Xavier basketball, Kentucky basketball or Louisville. Ohio State was off the radar. But I got to know Jim Tressel. He came by and absolutely murdered his in-home visit and I mean that in the best way possible. Him and Darrell Hazell, the wide receivers coach, they just had an unbelievable presentation. Plus we had some other guys like Terrelle Pryor, Mike Adams, Mike Brewster. We had one of the best recruiting classes in the country and we were all kind of recruiting each other. So Ohio State was a no-brainer.TS: You say Jim Tressel killed his in-home visit. What stood out from him when you were being recruited and then when you played under him?DP: Personable. He’s one of the people who knows everyone in your family, what they’re doing, what they’re involved in. That was one thing that I was fond about with him: his attention to detail and how much of a human he was. I hope that doesn’t sound crazy. The things that he would ask me to do off the field, like my freshman year, he asked me to speak to the student body. I asked him why, and he said ‘I want to take the future leaders of my team to connect with the school on a bigger level.’ That’s just one example of what he did. He could get in touch with you on a different level.TS: You guys had a top 10 class and had Terrelle Pryor, who was the No. 1 quarterback recruit in the class that year. Ohio State had also played in the national championship the two years before that. Was there any added pressure because of that?DP: That’s what you get coming to Ohio State, those expectations. I think we were like preseason ranked No. 2 my freshman year. But they had guys like Brian Hartline, Brian Robiskie, Ray Small who were playing, Dane Sanzenbacher. My biggest goal was to be able to make the travel team. I was able to dress and then all of a sudden, they throw me in my first game, Todd Boeckman throws me a hitch route and I score the first time I touched the ball at Ohio State. From that moment on, I felt like ‘Okay, I can play at this level and make an impact.’TS: When you look back at what happened to you and Terrelle [Pryor] and some of the other guys your senior year, with the suspension [for selling team gear], and you hear the conversation that’s everywhere now about athletes being paid or being able to profit off their likeness, it isn’t reality yet but it seems to be getting more popular support. What is it like to see that? Have you followed that conversation?DP: Of course I follow that conversation. I feel like my story and what we went through is part of the reason why kids are getting paid more now and the reason why they have the system they have in place for championship rings or rewards. The NCAA is a running business plan. When I say that, I say it in the most respectful way. It’s an institution that is coming up with rules and dealing with different things as we speak. They had to come up with the Twitter rules. When I was coming out of high school, coaches were allowed to text message during the beginning of the recruiting process and then toward the end they weren’t allowed to text.For us, we sold the rings and got money for it. Now, the rule is you don’t get your championship rings until you graduate. You get everything at once. I’ve paid attention to it. I’ve said no to stories from Outside the Lines and Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel because I just wanted to get my career going in the NFL. But it’s something that has impacted me and how I look at things and I think my perspective is very unique because I have a different relationship with the NCAA and view them in a different light. I understand that their practices are a bit underdeveloped. It seems as though it’s a great institution and things are the way they should be but they’re trying to figure out the right way to go about things like kids are. More importantly, the kids make so much money for the university. It’s important for kids to realize what they are getting into. They’re getting into a business deal. They’re giving you however much it costs for a degree over four years, and in exchange, you’re giving them services.TS: We heard that when you were at Ohio State that you and Terrelle Pryor used to tear it up in intramural and pickup hoops. Is that true? How good were you guys?DP: (Laughing) I was on the intramural team and me and TP used to dominate some games. It’s kind of funny, that’s how I met Terrelle when we were younger. We both played AAU basketball. We would always meet up in the championship [in AAU]. It was kind of cool to be able to go in in the off-season at Ohio State and tear it down on the courts.TS: I know Terrelle was a pretty high-level Division I hoops recruit? Could you have played D-I basketball as well if you wanted to? How about track?DP: I had some track offers from down South schools. I had basketball offers from some small ACC and SEC schools. Akron recruited me. Coach Jeff Boals, he was at Akron at the time, he’s now at Ohio.TS: After college, your professional football journey has taken you from the Houston Texans to the New York Jets, you had to deal with injuries and now you’re playing in Canada. What has that whole experience been like with you and what is it specifically like playing in Canada? How does it compare to playing in America?DP: My football journey has been amazing. It’s taken me all over. The teammates that I’ve been able to become close with and bond with and the friends I have for life, it’s amazing. There really isn’t much difference as far as preparation between the two leagues [NFL and CFL]. I would say there is a financial difference in pay and how much each league is worth. But the CFL is a first-class league, A-1 as far as professionalism and to better yourself. I just appreciate both leagues.TS: Which guys that you played with at Ohio State are you still in touch with?DP: Oh man, I got a group chat with Boom Herron and Mike Adams and probably the guy I’m most closest with his Etienne Sabino. He was a linebacker and team captain. He played for Urban and played for Tressel and was the best man at my wedding. We always get together and speak. It’s therapeutic when you get to talk to the boys.TS: Last question: have you met or had a chance to meet Ryan Day in person? How do you feel about him taking over?DP: I haven’t had a chance to meet him but I’m excited. I’ve heard some great things about his offensive mentality and how he’s a great recruiter. I think I might make it down there this April to have a chance to meet him.TS: Do you think it would have been a fun offense for you to have played in, with the style of offense he runs?DP: Oh man, I wish I could have played in that offense. It would have been a great time.last_img read more

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Public Cool : A Q & A With Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne

first_img Editors’ Recommendations In 2008, two designers (and uber tastemakers) Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne started a label inspired by the energy only found in New York City. Five years later, Public School is nominated for a CFDA Swarovski Award for Menswear. Not only is Osborne and Chow born and raised in New York, they are living the New York dreamTheir clothing line is a modern take on classic tailored sportswear, and entirely made in New York City’s garment district, which is having a resurgence after a long, sad decline with many designers preferring to produce items overseas. For Fall 2013, expect to see interesting combinations like leather and wool paired jackets, pigment sprayed flannel shirts, sleek jeans and a futuristic looking shearling jacket that will get you excited for the cold weather again. We spoke with the boys of Public School about their beginnings and why New York City is so important to the line. How did Public School come about?Like how most brands start, we saw a need for something that wasn’t represented in the marketplace.How did you choose the name Public School?We had the name before the concept for the brand. We wanted a name that represented our experiences growing up in NYC and Public School encapsulated that entire idea in two words.What kind of guy wears Public School?The well traveled, confident, masculine man who understands how clothing should help change moods and attitudes.What was the inspiration for the upcoming autumn/winter collection?Unofficially titled “When No One’s Looking,” the collection explored the idea of breaking things down to the essence in order to find its truest expression.What was it like to be nominated for a CFDA?Dreamlike…please don’t wake us yet.Tell me about each of your backgrounds related to fashion?We’re both untrained in the classic sense and cut our teeth on the job. We spent most of our career together at the menswear label Sean John. But more importantly I think we relate to fashion the way we relate to our existence in NYC. Fashion was always a platform for us to stand out from the pack and express our collective cultural interests.Public School is made in NYC, take me through the process of that and why is it important to make your clothing using local resources?We wanted to control our quality and more importantly make product in the same city that continues to inspire us. NYC is perfectly imperfect just like our collections, so the nuance of the city is ingrained in every stitch. In our garments you’ll not only find our stories, but the stories of the multi-generational old factories in the NYC garment center. Your Guide to a Road Trip Across New York State Hillrock Estate Distillery Is Making Some of the Best Whiskey in America Kia Telluride Is the Perfect Road Tripper for All Two- and Four-Legged Friends The Nomadic Beer Maestros of Evil Twin Brewing Find a Permanent Home in Queens The Fine Art of Restoring a 1974 Range Rover Classiclast_img read more

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ICYMI APTNs Dennis Ward reports on weekend events in StandingRock North Dakota

first_imgDennis WardAPTN National NewsSupporters from more than 100 American Tribes converged on North Dakota to stand side by side with the Standin Rock Sioux Tribe in their fight against the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline project.On Friday, everyone was waiting for a U.S. Federal court judge would support an injunction to stop work on the site the Sioux Tribe says is sacred ground.dward@aptn.calast_img

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