President Trump suggests Delaying the Election until people can Safely Vote

first_imgBut the President has no authority to reschedule the general election per Federal law set in 8145 which stipulates that it always be held on the first Tuesday of the month of November. To move the election, Congress would have to pass new legislation to change the voting schedule, something experts say is extremely unlikely but not impossible given the constraints of the coronavirus pandemic. For the first time ever, a sitting president, Donald Trump, has suggested delaying the presidential election set for November 3rd.President Trump on Twitter this morning raising the idea of delaying November’s election, writing that mail in voting would lead to what he believes will be quote “the most INACCURATE & FRAUDULENT Election in history.” The president asking quote: “Delay the Election until people can properly, securely and safely vote???” With Universal Mail-In Voting (not Absentee Voting, which is good), 2020 will be the most INACCURATE & FRAUDULENT Election in history. It will be a great embarrassment to the USA. Delay the Election until people can properly, securely and safely vote???— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 30, 2020last_img read more

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Kyle McKenney moves past concussions to become top rower

first_imgEight years ago, Kyle McKenney would’ve never guessed he’d end up rowing for Syracuse.Eight years ago, he suffered his third concussion while playing basketball. Doctors told McKenney that he needed to stop playing contact sports, leaving him with few options.“We thought, well, how about tennis? How about swimming?” said Lynnda McKenney, Kyle’s mother.McKenney had other ideas. He lived on Lake Sammamish in Woodinville, Washington. His friends had just joined Sammamish Rowing Association, a private program, and he thought he’d give it a try.Eight years later, McKenney, a junior, is one of Syracuse’s top rowers. He shifts around on the first varsity eight boat, a role he filled in the spring. Needing a sport to salvage his athletic career in eighth grade, McKenney has made the most of his talents.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I liked being better than the guy next to you, always seeing where the other boat is and knowing that you could make your boat go a little further than the other guy,” McKenney said.Although rowing is becoming more popular, McKenney said, his parents weren’t completely sold on its unconventional aspects.“Especially when I started wearing spandex,” said McKenney. “They weren’t used to it. We’re a baseball family. I just got hit too many times that I had to start wearing the spandex.”McKenney would become a member of Sammamish’s high school men’s boat, leading his team to second-place finish in a competition at the Head of the Charles in Boston in 2012. He began hearing from multiple colleges, one being the University of Washington.At the time, it seemed like a good fit. Three out of Washington’s five coxswains are from Sammamish. With the close connections between the two organizations, McKenney’s mind was made up.“That’s where I was going to go because that’s what I could afford and what I really wanted to do,” he said.In the winter, Shawn Bagnall, then-assistant men’s rowing coach at Syracuse, met with McKenney. He had barely heard of Syracuse, but as he looked more into it, he started to consider the school seriously.McKenney first visited SU in March 2013, where he was sold by the expertise and style of men’s rowing head coach, Dave Reischman.“When he’s watching your stroke, he can tell what needs to be changed, and he says it in a way that can hit home for me and make those types of changes quickly,” said McKenney.The quality of the school, along with a scholarship, swayed McKenney into choosing Syracuse over Washington. He chose a path that he believes will result in greater, long-term success.“We think kids who want to come to Syracuse want something different,” said Syracuse men’s rowing head coach Dave Reischman. “Kyle is the ideal kid we try to recruit.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 30, 2015 at 9:12 pm Contact Chris: cfthomse@syr.edulast_img read more

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Men’s Basketball: Badgers drop another close contest to Temple

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team (4-6, 1-1 Big Ten) fell 55-59 to Temple (7-2, 0-0 AAC) last night in Philadelphia.The Badgers dropped another close contest after nearly giving up a large lead in their previous game to Penn State.  Aleem Ford’s layup at the 3:27 minute mark to give Wisconsin a three point lead made the game look winnable, however the team was unable to score a single point with the remaining time in what became a four point loss.Men’s Basketball: Badgers look to turn season around as Big Ten play beginsMonday night, the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team continue the early season portion of their Big Ten schedule with Read…The dagger came when the Badgers were down by two.  Off an open three by Kobe King, Quinton Rose recorded a clutch rebound over Aleem Ford to clinch the victory for the Owls. While Rose is the team’s leading scorer, he otherwise had a relatively quiet day, scoring just nine points with three boards in the contest.Fellow guard Shizz Alston Jr. was able to step up in Rose’s place, hitting 7-15 for 22 points and a 4-1 assist to turnover ratio.  However, what was most impressive about Alston’s performance was his 6-6 free throw shooting with the final four coming in the last few minutes.During a post-game interview, the Washington post quoted Wisconsin head coach Greg Garg explained that fouling Rose was a mistake that the team did not want to make.“He was not the guy we wanted to foul,” Gard said, “They did a good job of getting the ball to him, and good players find a way to go get it.”The foul shots Also gave Alston the Temple school record of 50 straight free throws. During the same interview with Gard, the junior guard noted, “The record wouldn’t have meant much if we lost. I’m glad we got the win.”The elation for the Owls was met with equal disappointment with a Badger team that has continually been unable to finish late in games this season.  Even in their last victory against Penn State the team was one made three away from blowing a 17 point victory with just 10 minutes remaining in the second half. Former Badger star Jordan Taylor continues successful career abroadThere are countless athletes that have come through the University of Wisconsin over the years to play for the Badgers. Read…Despite missing a late layup that could have kept the Badgers competitive, Ethan Happ had to carry the load once again.  The forward had a solid 11-19 performance with 22 points and six rebounds.  Unfortunately, similar to other contests the teammates around Happ were unable to match his production.The scars of losing long contributing seniors like Hayes, Showalter, Koenig, and Brown are more apparent now than ever.  If the Badgers want to remain in the NCAA tournament hunt, they will need to shed their inexperience soon and start performing better in key games.last_img read more

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Crosstown showdown

first_imgFreshman forward Penelope Hocking has scored 12 goals this season and competes on the Under-20 Women’s National Team. (Emily Smith | Daily Trojan)The No. 2 women’s soccer team will face off No. 6 UCLA  Friday night at the StubHub Center, bringing a close to the regular Pac-12 season. After a win against No. 20 Colorado and a shutout tie against Utah, the Trojans are now 15-1-2 overall and 8-1-1 in conference play. USC will take a seven-game undefeated streak into the matchup. The 13-3-1 Bruins are coming off eight consecutive victories, the most recent being against Colorado. Sophomore attacker Ashley Sanchez played an integral role in both of the Bruins’ goals. After a Colorado foul early in the 19th minute, Sanchez launched a free kick to the left side, which helped create a scoring opportunity for redshirt junior midfielder Chloe Castaneda. The Bruins kept Colorado at bay, holding it to zero shots on goal and a 1-0 lead at the close of the half. Colorado came out strong in the second half, creating multiple scoring opportunities with a shot that hit the post in the 63rd minute and a narrowly missed free kick in the 64th. Buffs attacker Taylor Kornieck nailed a cross in front of the left post, scoring the tying goal and bringing the score to 1-1.In the 77th minute, UCLA’s Sanchez scored the game-winner when she stole the ball from a Colorado and launched it from close range past the Buffs keeper. Sanchez will be the main offensive player on the Trojans’ radar heading into the game on Friday. She leads the Bruins in all scoring categories with 23 points, 8 goals and seven assists. Sanchez has also either scored a goal or provided an assist in each of UCLA’s last eight games. The Trojans currently have a 398-minute streak going of keeping opponents scoreless, but the defense will need to be on high alert for the Bruins’ aggressive offensive plays. Sunday’s win also marked the fourth time in USC history that the team has marked 13 clean sheets in a season.  On the offensive end, the Trojans have outscored their opponents 46-7. Their goal differential of 39 leads the Pac-12 conference. Having outshot opponents 354-144 this year, the Trojans will need to continue working hard to control possession from the beginning in order to create scoring opportunities against the Bruins, whose goalies tail right behind redshirt sophomore Trojan keeper Kaylie Collins with a combined 41 saves. Four of the last five wins in a USC-UCLA matchup have gone to the Bruins, including the last two in a row. The last time the two teams faced off, the Bruins took the Trojans into overtime, with Sanchez scoring the winning goal in the 91st minute. The Trojans ended up tying the Bruins for a second-place finish in the Pac-12. UCLA leads the Crosstown Showdown series against USC with an all-time record of 24-6-1. The Trojans are tied at the top of the Pac-12 standings this season with No. 1 Stanford at 25 points each, while the Bruins follow close in second with 24 points. In addition to playing for a chance at the Pac-12 Conference title, both UCLA and USC head into the game vying for favorable seeding in the NCAA tournament. The Trojans are ahead of the Bruins coming in at second place on the most recent United Soccer Coaches NCAA Division I Women’s national poll with 828 total points and two first place votes, compared to the Bruins’ 679 points and sixth place ranking.  The Trojans will host the Bruins in the crosstown showdown at StubHub Center Friday at 7 p.m.last_img read more

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Guyana coalition backs Granger for president

first_imgGEORGETOWN, Guyana, – President David Granger seems to have the backing of the members of the coalition A Partnership for National Unity (APNU) as it prepares for a possible regional and general election in March this year.The granger coalition collapsed last month after then government backbencher, Charrandass Persaud, on December 21 backed a motion of no confidence filed by the general secretary of the main opposition People’s Progressive Party (PPP), Bharrat Jagde.The decision by Persaud, a former member of the Alliance for Change (AFC), the second biggest member in the coalition, meant that regional and general elections are likely by March this year in keeping with the Guyana Constitution. The coalition had enjoyed a one seat majority in the 65-member National Assembly.The High Court is expected to give a ruling by month-end as the government seeks to challenge the validity of the votes cast in the National Assembly.Amma Ally, the general secretary of the People’s National Congress Reform (PNCR), the biggest member of the coalition and Granger’s own party, said despite orchestrated rumors and untruths regarding the health of the incumbent he is still considered “fit and proper” for a second term and “the PNCR endorses his candidature.”Granger is in Cuba undergoing medical treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and his doctors there have said he continues to respond well to the treatment and should make a full recovery.Ally said the party looks forward to be under his guidance for a second term and urged Guyanese to vote for vision, development, cordiality, selfless work and enjoy the good life.“We are also cognisant of his discipline and in no way can he be deemed as a corrupt leader. He possesses the necessary qualities that are required to be a country’s leader. He has constantly been active in cleaning up the 23 years of mess which the PPP put our country in,” Ally added.Another coalition party, the National Front Alliance (NFA) said it too would be supporting Granger.“We look forward to the opportunity to reaffirm our support for him. We did have our executive meeting earlier in the year, coming out in support of that,” said NFA executive member, Keith Scott, who is also Minister of Labor.“The people of this country trust President Granger, he has the right discipline. He has been very democratic in his dealings since he has acceded to power, and that is the kind of person that we need to bring healing in this society.”The Working People’s Alliance (WPA) executive member, Dr. Rupert Roopnaraine, said he sees no reason for his party to be swayed from President Granger as the candidate.“He’s a very upright person, very principled. No one can point a finger at him in relations to personal corruption, he’s really a model citizen, and we’ll be in support,” said Roopnaraine.Granger, who led the coalition to victory in 2015, will face Irfaan Ali,  who last weekend, said that he was “extremely humbled” with the party’s decision to pick him to lead it into the next election.last_img read more

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Angels’ Shohei Ohtani closes in on a complete ‘spring training’

first_img Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Neither Eppler nor Ausmus would commit to Ohtani playing on Tuesday, although so far neither has ruled it out. Detroit is the next stop in a trip that has nine games remaining, after the two in Mexico.“We hope to be able to activate on him this trip but he has to get through every step of the progression so we’re not going to say anything till he progression is finished,” Eppler said. “That’s just the mindful thing to do.”Eppler also said that Ohtani does not have any predetermined schedule for managing his workload when he returns. He will be evaluated on a day-to-day basis to determine how often he can play. Ausmus has said he plans on using Ohtani essentially as the everyday DH, without regard to whether they are facing a lefty or righty.Ohtani will also wear a special brace on his surgically-repaired right elbow when he’s running the bases. He’s gotten some training on how to slide in a way that keeps “his arm a little bit out of the way,” Eppler said.As for Ohtani’s throwing program, it will continue once he returns to the lineup. Ohtani is expected to continue progressing all the way until he’s facing hitters, sometime in the fall, Eppler said. MONTERREY, Mexico — As Shohei Ohtani has blown past the 40-plate appearance mark that Manager Brad Ausmus first suggested was the goal for his rehab from Tommy John surgery, General Manager Billy Eppler said that was a soft target all along, based on a normal spring training workload.“Typically we like to get guys around 50, so if you look through what Albert or Mike or a lot of the regulars would get, it’s generally around 50,” Eppler said Sunday morning. “Justin Bour had mid-50s. Forty is a lower end of the norm for people. So 40 was not the goal. It was to get him to the level that everyone else faces in spring training.”Ohtani had 50 plate appearances after Saturday’s workout and he was scheduled for more at-bats, against a right-handed and left-handed pitcher, on Sunday. Eppler would not say the pitchers Ohtani was facing, but Andrew Heaney was also scheduled to face hitters for 30 pitches on Sunday as part of his rehab.If Ohtani did face Heaney on Sunday, it would be a convenient step in his rehab. Not only would Ohtani get to finally face a major league pitcher, but he would see a left-hander. The Detroit Tigers are starting lefties each of the first two days of the series starting Tuesday. Justin Upton (sprained toe) has been out of the walking boot for more than a week and a couple days ago reported to Eppler that “his toe felt good as it’s felt the entire time, so that was a positive.” Eppler said Upton will continue to add weight-bearing exercises. He is expected back sometime in June. …Ausmus said he’s been pleased with how Justin Bour has handled his demotion to the No. 8 spot in the lineup. “He’s been fine. His attitude is great. His work ethic is great. He’s doing everything he’s supposed to do.”Ausmus dropped Bour in the lineup because he was hitting .176 with a .571 OPS. after five games in the No. 8 spot, he’s hitting .169 with a .578 OPS. …Ausmus will be managing in Detroit for the first time since the end of his four-run tenure as manager, a run that ended with a 98-loss season in 2017. “I’m sure they’ll cheer me,” Ausmus said with a smile. “I actually enjoyed my time there. It’s a good area. People that don’t know Detroit, it kind of has a bad rap. But it’s actually a great city.” Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros ALSOTommy La Stella was scratched from Sunday’s lineup because of back tightness. …Cody Allen (back) is expected to be activated on Tuesday, Ausmus said. Allen had lost his closer role just before going on the injured list, and Ausmus said he will continue to use Allen in the same lower-leverage role he had before he was hurt. …Related Articleslast_img read more

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All trick and no treat, snow & very cold weather to arrive late Monday

first_imgMASON CITY — There may be more than just frost on the pumpkin next week. We’re only a little over a month into fall, but forecasters say wide sections of Iowa could soon be looking more wintry — as snow may fly late Monday and into Tuesday. Meteorologist Allan Curtis, at the National Weather Service, says any flakes that do fall won’t linger long.  “The best chances for people seeing snow is going to be across the north and northwest,” Curtis says. “They may even see a little bit of those flurries stick to the ground through the morning. As you work toward the south and eastern portions of the state, things are going to be a little warmer so any flurries they see will quickly dissipate as the day goes on Tuesday.” It’s the time of year when the weather does a lot of flip-flopping, and kids may be forced to wear coats over their trick-or-treat costumes. “It goes back and forth from fairly comfortable, like we’re going to see today in the 50s, to not quite as comfortable,” Curtis says. “Early to the middle of next week, right in time for Halloween, we’ll see a system push through and we’ll probably see highs struggle to reach the mid- to upper-30s, both Tuesday and Wednesday.” The normal high temperature for Des Moines on this date is 60 degrees, so having highs only in the 30s is well below average. He notes, the first snowfall of the season can get some Iowans a little worked up. “We always want to stress to people, if you are traveling, even though it’s going to be some light flurries and snow, just take a little extra caution,” Curtis says. “People get excited when those events occur.” The long-range forecast calls for a slight warm-up by next Thursday. Winter arrives this year on December 21st.last_img read more

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Broncos name Marshall in their squad for the Auckland Nines

first_imgNew signing Benji Marshall will feature up in the backline alongside other star names including Anthony Milford, James Roberts and Darius Boyd.With the likes of Adam Blair, Andrew McCullogh and Matt Gillett also selected it’s hard to see the side struggling this year.The Broncos will fancy their chances in a group with the Melbourne Storm, Newcastle Knights and Wests Tigers. BRONCOS’ NRL AUCKLAND NINES SQUADAlex BarrAdam BlairDarius BoydGerome BurnsMitch CroninMatt GillettJordan KahuSam LaveaMatiu Love-HenryBenji MarshallAndrew McCulloughAnthony MilfordFrancis MoloCorey OatesJonus PearsonJames RobertsGehamat ShibasakiJaydn Su’Alast_img read more

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Enna’s Golden Goal Lifts Drake Men’s Soccer Over Valpo In MVC Tournament

first_img Preview Live Stats vs. Loyola 11/9/2018 – 3 p.m. PDF Box Score EVANSVILLE, Ind. – A golden goal from Drake University’s Steven Enna (Overland Park, Kan.) in the 105th minute pushed the Drake men’s soccer team past Valparaiso, 2-1, in the quarterfinals of the Missouri Valley Conference Tournament.Enna’s gamewinner in the second overtime came off a feed from Alex Peterson (St. Cloud, Minn.) that Enna collected, turned and fired past the keeper from the top of the 6-yard box. The goal capped a dominating performance from Enna that included eight shots, four of them on frame, from the senior. Drake (7-6-3) scored first and early with a header from Leroy Enzugusi (Marion, Iowa) in the fourth minute of action. Lucas Bartlett (Overland Park, Kan.) delivered a cross into the box that Valpo keeper Nacho Miras was unable to corral and Enzugusi promptly headed the ball into goal for his eighth score of the season.Valpo (5-8-4) tied the match in the 37th minute on a goal from Tyler Curylo that was scored off a deflected save of a shot from Adan Garcia. The shot was one of only seven that Valpo put on target that was not stopped by Drake keeper Jared Brown. Miras made eight stops in goal for Valpo.Drake held a 21-15 advantage in shots behind Enna’s playmaking up front. The Bulldogs advance to face No. 2 seed Loyola Friday, Nov. 9, at 3 p.m. in Evansville’s Arad McCutchan Stadium. The semifinal match will be broadcast on ESPN+.Drake last played in a MVC Championship semifinal in 2015 when it defeated Bradley. 2015 was the last time the Bulldogs captured an MVC Tournament championship. Print Friendly Version Full Schedule Roster Photo Gallery Story Links Next Game: ESPN+ Watch Livelast_img read more

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Weird Evolution Tales

first_imgEvolutionary theory leads to some fantastic tales.  Since evolution is often presumed to be a fact that explains everything in biology, and is itself not subject to testing or doubt, everything in biology must be viewed through an evolutionary lens.  This hard-core stance on evolution often leads to assertions and explanations that appear contrived, if not preposterous, to Darwin doubters.  Here are some recent examples of weird evolution stories that made it past the logic inspectors simply because evolution is unquestioned. 1. The incredible shrinking brain:  On the BBC News, readers were told, “Old age…has evolved to help meet the demands of raising smarter babies.”  As if to pre-empt puzzled looks and questions by some readers, the article added, “And it is not such a stretch, Dr [Chet] Sherwood [George Washington U] suggests, to conclude that grandparents’ extended lives are in an evolutionary sense there to relieve mothers from being solely responsible for raising their big-brained, energetically costly infants.”  The Scientist also bought this idea uncritically. 2. The early brain gets the IQ:  Live Science told its readers, “It took at least 3.5 billion years for intelligent life to evolve on Earth, and the only reason we’re able to contemplate the likelihood of life today is that its evolution happened to get started early.” 3. The arctic brain gets the eye size:  Judith Burns at the BBC News told readers, “Dark winters ‘led to bigger human brains and eyeballs’.”  A team publishing in the Royal Society Biology Letters “found a positive relationship between absolute latitude and both eye socket size and cranial capacity.”  But don’t think that means Eskimos make better philosophers: “The Oxford University team said bigger brains did not make people smarter.”  It just means the bigger eyes need more visual neurons; “It’s just they need bigger eyes and brains to be able to see well where they live.”  Wasn’t cranial capacity, though, the sine qua non of human evolution?  “The work indicates that humans are subject to the same evolutionary trends that give relatively large eyes to birds that sing first during the dawn chorus, or species such as owls that forage at night.”   Astonishing as it may seem, these adaptations occurred rapidly in the tens of thousands of years since humans first migrated into the arctic; Robin Dunbar commented, “they seem to have adapted their visual systems surprisingly rapidly to the cloudy skies, dull weather and long winters we experience at these latitudes.” New Scientist and the BBC News gave this theory a wink and an approving smile.  But did the big-eyed people evolve a resistance to snow blindness?  4. From hydrogen to charity:  You only give to charities across the world because evolution figured out it’s less costly to be nice to every person you meet, even if you will never see them, than to risk offending someone you might see again.  This is the gist of a story on PhysOrg about how generosity evolved.  Tooby and Cosmides had to fit this into evolution because, obviously, “one of the outstanding problems in the behavioral sciences was why natural selection had not weeded out this pleasing but apparently self-handicapping behavioral tendency” to be nice to strangers; “If traditional theories in these fields are true, such behaviors should have been weeded out long ago by evolution or by self-interest,” the article noticed. 5. How irreducibly complex blood clotting evolved:  The blood clotting cascade was one of the prime examples of irreducible complexity that Michael Behe used in his intelligent-design treatise, Darwin’s Black Box.  PhysOrg, by contrast, contends that “Evolution provides clue to blood clotting.”  One of the many proteins involved in clotting, called VWF, is essential.  J. Evan Sadler was aware that “The challenge for the cell is how to build this massive protein without clogging the machinery,” so he “looked to evolution” for “evolutionary clues” about its origin.  He found similarities in key amino acids across species, and then found what happens when he mutated them: they cease functioning.  How this answered Behe’s argument or showed evolution instead of design was not clarified. 6. Bifocal fish:  Some fish in mangrove swamps need to see above and below the water surface simultaneously.  They have eyes adapted to this need, with parts of the retina sensing light coming from below water sensitive to yellows, and parts sensing light above water more sensitive to blues.  According to PhysOrg, a study at University of British Columbia attributed this adaptation to new functions emerging out of duplicated genes: it “illuminates how gene duplication can lead to innovation – in this case each half of the eye gets its own duplicate, tailored to its particular needs,” was the conclusion.  How this represents mutation or innovation instead of tuning existing function was not illuminated. 7. Convergent butterflies:  According to PhysOrg, “Butterfly study sheds light on convergent evolution.”  But the study by UC Irvine on how similar red patterns can be found on unrelated butterflies does not so much confirm convergent evolution  (a term invented after the fact to explain common features that defy evolutionary theory), as much as to describe how innate genetic mechanisms (primarily gene expression) allow for common variations within common environments.  The butterflies are still butterflies.  The authors did not attempt to explain metamorphosis by evolution (see 07/26/2011).  Robert Reed, evolutionary biologist at UC Irvine, said “Out of the tens of thousands in a typical genome, it seems that only a handful tend to drive major evolutionary change over and over again.”  Those must be super-powerful genes.  Reed had more to say about that:  “Biologists have been asking themselves, ‘Are there really so few genes that govern evolution?’” Reed said. “This is a beautiful example of how a single gene can control the evolution of complex patterns in nature. Now we want to understand why: What is it about this one gene in particular that makes it so good at driving rapid evolution?”  Another evolutionist quoted by Science Daily was ecstatic: “Now this group has discovered that a single gene underlies one of the most spectacular evolutionary radiations in nature! Perhaps the genetic basis for diversity will turn out to be far more simple than we expected.”  Reducing evolution to single genes, though, puts more creative responsibility on them, and raises new questions: how did a gene with such enormous innovative potential evolve in the first place? 8. Of panda thumbs and mole investments:  Like pandas, moles have extra “thumbs” that grow out of the sesamoid bone.  The BBC News announced, “Mystery of mole’s second thumb solved.”  Live Science merely claimed that the adaptation helps the animal, but then offered a composite explanation (including Lamarckism) for why other mole species don’t have the extra appendage: they “never developed the need to tunnel underground to the same extent, so never fully developed the outer thumb, or environmental changes no longer required them to develop it, so they stopped investing extra energy into growing them, the researchers say.”  Jennifer Carpenter at the BBC News, though, was sure Darwin should take the credit for the five-finger salute, when other numbers of digits are possible: “But evolution seems to have favoured the five-fingered.” 9. On sex in insects:  A butterfly was found with both male and female traits [Earthweek].  Some ant species are sexual, some are asexual.   Is there a law of nature that explains these differences?  The Scientist honored a paper on this as a “tour de force of both field work and lab work” because it can “offer insight into a long standing question in evolutionary biology about what forces cause species to choose sex over asexual reproduction and vice versa,” according to an evolutionary biologist.   The idea is that asexuality should be favored by evolution because it is less costly.  When looking at lineages of ants, though, the evolutionary explanation becomes more convoluted: “Tracking differences in other, slowly mutating genes to retrace the evolutionary history of the ants, the team confirmed that the common ancestor of the group probably reproduced sexually, and that asexuality had evolved multiple times independently.”  How can we check out this idea?  “If you come back in 5 million or 10 million years, there’s a good chance the asexual lineages go extinct, but the sexual lineages are still existing.”  Any volunteers? 10. Evolutionists promote junk DNA to chief evolver:  Bold type tells readers of PhysOrg, “Scientists present evidence for groundbreaking evolution theory,” as if Darwin didn’t break enough ground.  “The popular belief among scientists that certain sequences of DNA are relatively unimportant in the evolutionary process has been turned on its head by two Murdoch University researchers.”  The dramatic proposal by Oliver and Greene is that “jumping genes are actually driving the evolutionary process in some species.”  So sure are they that differences between apes and humans can be explained by this idea, “it’s very hard to see how primates and humans could have evolved in the way they have, without the intervention of jumping genes.”  It appeared necessary to rescue standard evolution theory from the evidence, so Oliver and Greene “further developed their theory into four modes that help shed light on why evolution sometimes occurs in fits and starts, sometimes gradually and sometimes hardly at all. Therefore, their jumping gene theory helps to explain a number of mysteries in biology, including why species suddenly appear in the fossil record, why some groups of organisms are species-rich and others are species-poor.”  But can jumping genes generate a trilobite all at once?  Not only that, they can solve multiple creationist arguments in a single blow: “Lineages with active jumping genes or large uniform populations of them spawn new species readily because they possess a greater ability to evolve, diversify and survive. An example of this is bats,” said Mr Oliver. “But species which are deficient in jumping genes or with inactive jumping genes tend to risk extinction because they lack the capacity to adapt, change and diversify. The so-called ‘living fossils’ like the fish coelacanth and the reptile tuatara are good examples. “It also helps to explain why some species change little over millions of years like these living fossils. And why almost all species do not eliminate this junk DNA from their genomes.” 11. Origin of cancer species: A new view of cancer is evolving in evolutionary minds: that it represents a new parasitic species. PhysOrg advertised the position by Peter Duesberg at UC Berkeley: “Duesberg and UC Berkeley colleagues describe their theory that carcinogenesis – the generation of cancer – is just another form of speciation, the evolution of new species.”  The ghost of Julian Huxley got a cameo appearance on stage. 12. Lego evolution: If individual mutations present a problem for evolutionary theory, maybe more is better.  PhysOrg presented a view of “modular evolution” that allows Darwin to assemble innovations with pluggable parts.  “Evolution seems to use the existing signaling pathways almost like a modular construction system,” the article explained, describing the work of Xiaoyue Wang on roundworms.  He sees cancer as a useful Lego block: “ don’t believe that what we have discovered in our study of nematodes is an unusual exception,” Wang said.  “Similar processes are known to lead to cancer development in humans. But likewise, they can initiate changes that can become subject to natural selection and eventually be propagated in the course of evolution.’” In each of these articles, evolution was taken for granted as the catch-all explanation for anything and everything.  No Darwin skeptics were quoted to challenge the evolutionary stories.  For an encore, consider an entry on Wired News (or should that be Weird?) that “Larger Brains May Have Evolved Due to Sports, Not Smarts.”  Such a claim contradicts 150 years of evolutionary claims about the origin of human intelligence.  The study compared brain sizes across species and correlated it with prowess in physical abilities.  “While their data seemed to hold true for many mammals, it seemed to break down once humans were thrown into the mix,” reporter Brian Mossop admitted, indicating that data to support his headline was futureware: “In other words, comparing humans to other non-primate species may be skipping too many evolutionary steps, so Raichlen said his team are [sic] changing their strategy for the future, to see whether these evolutionary connections are still at work within humans.”  To top it off, they could not provide a mechanism that would explain it: “Our paper makes some suggestions about how this might work on an evolutionary time scale,” [David] Raichlen [U of Arizona] said, “but I think there’s still a ton of work to do to figure out the mechanisms.” Paradigms can be stifling things.  They prevent scientists from thinking outside the box. One can imagine a creationist paradigm ruling biology that might similarly stifle thinking outside its box.  The solution is not boxes, but open doors.  Open the doors and windows and let the fresh air of lively debate enter.  Evolutionists and creationists need each other to avoid intellectual laziness.  Even a true position is sharpened by challenge, so long as the challenge is evidence-based and honest.  The Darwin box is a cylindrical echo chamber, with no openings for non-evolutionary paradigms – not even vent holes.  The inhabitants don’t notice the increasing stench inside, because they have gotten used to it.  Evolutionists seeking understanding in this arena are like the proverbial moron placed into a round room, told there is a penny in the corner.  Ever learning and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth, they pride themselves on the energy spent in their endless quest. Until academia opens its doors to serious challenge from outside its Darwin lockbox, journals and reporters will continue to give scientific explanation the runaround with circular arguments, taking victory laps in a stadium with no contest.(Visited 94 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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