Second ‘Justice Friday’ addresses LGBTQ issues

first_imgLast week, the Saint Mary’s Justice Education Department discussed issues facing LGBTQ students at its second “Justice Friday” event. Senior Eileen Cullina, president of the Straight and Gay Alliance (SAGA), said justice is an “enormous topic” affecting members of the LGBTQ community worldwide. “In 29 states … you can still be fired for being gay. That’s more than 50 percent,” Cullina said. “In 34 states, you can be fired for being transgender, and LGBTQ youth (under the age of 18) are seven times more likely to attempt suicide than youth in general.” Cullina said sharing this information can create positive change for LGBTQ students and the entire Saint Mary’s community. “I would hope for a response of awareness more than anything else,” she said. “There are a lot of people on campus who live in a bubble, who don’t think there are lesbians who live on campus, despite the stereotypes about girls’ schools.” Cullina said she knows of students on campus who are afraid of coming out about their sexuality, and many members of the LGBTQ community face aggressive discrimination from strangers. “There’s nothing like the feeling of knowing that someone is so angry that they want to physically hurt you, not because you said or did anything to them, but just because you exist and they have such a problem with who you are,” Cullina said. Although some people want to be open-minded about different kinds of sexuality, it can be difficult for them to be accepting when confronted with the issue face-to-face, Cullina said. “Something I think about every day is that the most important way to handle things is to never react negatively to comments and looks, but to always think about educating that person,” Cullina said. SAGA will participate inNational Coming Out Day on Oct. 11 and will host Ally Week at the end of October, Cullina said. During Ally Week, a panel of students, allies and professors will talk about what it means to be a LGBTQ student and what being an ally entails. “[Being] an ally means being someone who is LGBTQ-friendly and not being afraid to speak up – being a ‘super-friend,’” Cullina said. Cullina said allies play an important role in spreading awareness and informing others about the LGBTQ community, and SAGA will host ally training this school year. Cullina said she hopes SAGA’s events will help educate the entire Saint Mary’s community, even people who are already LGBTQ-friendly. “Although I think Saint Mary’s has a long way to go, I’ve met so many amazing friends and allies here at Saint Mary’s,” she said. Contact Angela Bakur at abakur01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

Read More →

August in Georgia

first_imgBy Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaAugust has arrived in Georgia. With the temperature topping 100 degrees, in some places for several days in a row, the merciless heat can be dangerous for many people.”We’re better prepared to handle intense heat in the South, but many people are still at risk,” said Connie Crawley, a food, nutrition and health specialist with the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.Intense heat leads to hyperthermia, with a range of symptoms including dizziness, rapid heartbeat, diarrhea, nausea, cramps, headache, intense weakness, breathing difficulty and mental changes. Another sign is an inability to sweat, which leads to a vicious cycle of worsening symptoms.At the top of the at-risk list, Crawley said, are the elderly.”As people get older, they aren’t as sensitive to body changes,” she said. “They tend to get into trouble faster and recognize it slower.”Drinking more fluids is the best way to fight the deadly dehydrating effect of high heat. But older people may even resist drinking more fluids, Crawley said, to avoid more frequent bathroom visits.”Thirst lags behind the body’s need for water,” she said. “That’s especially true for older people, who may not be as conscious of thirst cues as younger adults.”The very young are also at risk, she said. They, too, aren’t very aware of health-threatening changes around them.”Infants and young children also have a high proportion of water to body weight,” she said. “They need more fluids, but they aren’t aware of it.”Both the elderly and the very young aren’t as likely, or as able, to tell others of their needs. “So the people around them need to do proactive things that help prevent heat stress,” Crawley said.In general, she said, “use common sense.” Find easy ways to lower at-risk people’s exposure to heat and raise their intake of fluids.Encourage them to drink water regularly. Plain, moderately cool water is best. Ice water isn’t as well absorbed, and it can upset the stomach.Most kids will drink bottled water, she said. “Juice is good, too, especially diluted with half water. But cut down on the sugar,” she said. “It’s best to teach children to enjoy plain water.”Any nonalcoholic fluid will meet the body’s needs, Crawley said. Alcohol dehydrates the body and can make a person even less aware of heat stress signals.Caffeine can have the same dehydrating effect. “Coffee, tea and caffeine-containing soft drinks probably aren’t the best choices,” she said.Use commonsense approaches to reduce the heat’s effect, too. Wearing light-colored, loose-fitting clothes can help greatly. “There are special fabrics now designed especially to wick away sweat,” she said. “Look for these fabrics to wear if you will be working or exercising outside in the heat.”The most important thing is to schedule your most active times, particularly outdoors, in the early morning or very late, just before dark.The real sufferers, she said, are people such as road construction workers who must work outside. “The best advice for them is to drink plenty of fluids and take breaks in the shade whenever feasible,” she said.”They’re probably some of the few people beside endurance athletes,” she said, “who would benefit from sports drinks that replace electrolytes.”If you don’t have air-conditioning, baths and cold compresses can help reduce the heat. A fan helps but can give you a false sense of coolness, she said.”You can’t trust your senses when it comes to the body’s need for water,” she said. “Just know you need to drink fluids regularly when it’s hot. And remember to watch out for others, especially the elderly and the very young.”(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Read More →

AgrAbility Program

first_img“They (the feeders) are not very complicated,” Rains said. “The main thing was having a source of funding, which is where Vocational Rehabilitation came in. We can work together to come up with ways to keep them (farmers/clients) farming with a disability.”AgrAbility is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and funding was just renewed for four more years.(Jordan Hill is an intern with the UGA Tifton Campus.) A small-town Georgia farmer, George Burke of Fitzgerald, counts his blessings for the much-needed assistance he received from the Georgia AgrAbility Project, a program that helps physically disabled farmers, ranchers and other agricultural workers.This federally funded program is coordinated in Georgia by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Institute on Human Development and Disability in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences.Burke’s disability was discovered at an early age. After biting an apple and cutting his lip at age 5, Burke was diagnosed with hemophilia, a blood-clotting disorder that impacts his farming abilities.“It’s more internal stuff,” Burke said. “When I get up in the morning, I’m sore from working hard the day before. The bleeding doesn’t stop. It continues to leak into the joints. It destroys the joints. It’s bone-on-bone rubbing.”Burke, who planted his roots in Fitzgerald in 1987, works with goats and manages three hay fields as well as tends to many other crops, including peaches and blueberries. His disease places his health in peril when he attempts to feed his goats. In past feedings, Burke has been knocked down by the goats. With hemophilia, the recovery time from a fall is much longer than normal.“As I go into the pen, they’re always crowding around to get fed,” Burke said. “They almost take your knees out. Sometimes I can be laid up for a couple of days just from getting hit.”To help keep Burke on his feet, AgrAbility recently delivered six inline feeders to his farm. Mounted on boards across posts on the inside of Burke’s fences, the feeders allow him to feed the goats without getting in the pen. They also allow Burke to feed the goats without getting scratched or hit.“They are portable, so he can move them to different pens with his tractor,” said Glen Rains, co-director of Georgia’s AgrAbility and a professor on the UGA Tifton Campus. Burke learned about AgrAbility through the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program. The two organizations work together to help disabled farmers get back to work without being hindered. Rains designed and developed the inline feeders with funding from Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program.last_img read more

Read More →

Blizzard Warning Issued For LI, Up to 20 Inches of Snow Possible

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A blizzard warning has been issued for Long Island ahead of a major nor’easter that could bury the region in up to 20 inches of snow, forecasters said.The National Weather Service’s Upton office issued the blizzard warning for all of the Island except for the East End, beginning midnight Monday through midnight Tuesday. Eastern Suffolk remains under a winter storm warning.Forecasters are calling for heavy snow with blizzard conditions and wind gusting as high as 55 miles per hour. Snow accumulation could range from 12-20 inches, with snow falling Tuesday morning at a rate of 2 to 4 inches per hour.The storm is expected to begin overnight and last through the day Tuesday.Such conditions will make traveling dangerous and could produce whiteout conditions, the weather service said.Drivers have been urged not to travel unless in an emergency, in which case they should keep an emergency kit handy in their vehicles, the weather service said. Stranded drivers have been advised to remain with their vehicles, if such a situation occurs.“Several roads may become impassable. Power outages are possible,” the agency said. “Damaging wind gusts possible across Long Island and coastal Connecticut.”The late winter storm may also have a serious impact on Long Island’s coastal communities along the South Shore. The weather service issued a coastal flood warning that runs from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Tuesday.Moderate coastal flooding is expected during high tide, forecasters warned. Beach erosion is also possible.“This is a major storm. This is a potentially dangerous storm,” Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone said Monday morning, adding that the county is in contact with state officials to monitor the situation.Suffolk County Police Commissioner Tim Sini urged residents to stay off the roads Tuesday if the storm lives up to its potential. Pet owners are advised to keep their pets indoors.last_img read more

Read More →

Holtsville Man Killed in Motorcycle Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 53-year-old man was killed when he crashed his motorcycle into the back of a tractor-trailer in his hometown of Holtsville on Tuesday night.Suffolk County police said Leonard Mastro was riding a 1976 BMW motorcycle westbound on Long Island Avenue when he hit the back of a tractor-trailer that was turning right into Bissett Nursery shortly after 8 p.m.Mastro was ejected from his bike, which was dragged under the truck and caught on fire, police said.The victim was taken to Stony Brook University Hospital, where he died Wednesday morning.The driver of the tractor-trailer, Rhondle Carlton Day Jr., of North Carolina, was not injured.Sixth Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on the crash to call them at 631-854-8652.last_img read more

Read More →

USACE Officials Tour Corpus Christi Dredging

first_imgUSACE photo by Francisco G. HammMaj. Gen. Scott A. Spellmon, Deputy Commanding General for Civil Works and Emergency Operations, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Headquarters, visited the Galveston District last week as part of a two-day Corpus Christi Ship Channel Improvement Project update. On the second day of his visit, he was joined by Brig Gen. Paul Owen, commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Southwestern Division and Col. Timothy Vail, Galveston District commander and members from his District’s team.The group toured the Ellis Island hopper dredge and Tug Douglas B. Mackie and were hosted by the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company, LLC.The Ellis Island started dredging operations in early December 2017 on Phase 1 of the MSCIP Comprehensive Barrier Island Restoration Plan and is one of the newest and the largest hopper dredge in the American fleet.USACE photo by Francisco G. Hammlast_img read more

Read More →

Dutch to advise drought stricken South Africa on sustainable water practices

first_imgSouth Africa is seeking the expertise of the Netherlands to help manage its scarce water resources amid a severe drought. The Netherlands plans to share centuries of knowledge and expertise around water management when it sends a delegation to South Africa this week.With more than a quarter of the Netherlands below sea level and 60 percent of the country classified flood-prone, the Dutch are no strangers to dealing with water-related threats.The Dutch delegation will explore issues of water quality, sanitation, water scarcity, and water safety both in terms of rain and flooding.South Africa is currently facing a water crisis with five provinces being declared drought disaster areas, which is threatening food security in the country.The country is looking elsewhere for sustainable solutions as continues to battle a shortage of water.last_img read more

Read More →

Jack Colback believes unity is key for Newcastle

first_img The Magpies have been criticised this season for a lack of work rate and commitment but Colback believes the display at Tottenham shows what can be achieved when the players work together. “It shows that when we’re all at it, when we’re all focussed and concentrating, when we’re all together as a unit, we can be very difficult to beat,” Colback told nufc.co.uk. “We are a good team. We showed that against Liverpool and again (at Tottenham). “We came here with a game plan to be compact and it looked to be working until we conceded. But we showed our character to come back and win.” Tottenham were the better side in the first half but Newcastle emerged a different team after the interval, pressing harder and passing faster to assume control of the contest. “The first half was difficult. They have a really good set-up here where they work so hard to win the ball, give you no time or space and then when they have it they keep it very well,” Colback said. “At half-time we said that it’s only 1-0 and that we were still very much in the game. “Then in the second half the game opened up a bit, we were able to express ourselves a bit more and we got the two goals. Newcastle’s 2-1 win at White Hart Lane saw Steve McClaren’s side register back-to-back wins for the first time since November 2014 and climb out of the Premier League relegation zone, into 15th in the table. Spurs looked on course for an expected three points when Eric Dier headed home in the first half but goals from Newcastle substitutes Aleksandar Mitrovic and Ayoze Perez in the final 16 minutes completed a remarkable turnaround. Newcastle midfielder Jack Colback believes Sunday’s shock win over Tottenham shows what the Magpies can do when they pull together in the same direction. “We got the equaliser from the set-piece and a point would have been a great result here, we would have been happy with that, but you always hope that you will be able to nick it. “And when the ball fell to Ayo he was able to win the game for us – that was a massive bonus. “It’s a fantastic win. To come here, against a team who had only lost once all season was brilliant. That can really push us on. We’ve got back-to-back victories now and have to build on this.” Press Associationlast_img read more

Read More →

USG discusses description of WSA workshop

first_imgAn event hosted by the Women’s Student Assembly was the topic of debate at the weekly Undergraduate Student Government Senate meeting Tuesday night in the Ronald Tutor Campus Center.USG held its “Open Forum” program in which non-USG students can come in, voice a comment and have a discussion with USG senators and meeting attendees. Tuesday’s non-USG visitor, Brandon Zelner, was not physically present, but delivered his comment through a letter.In the letter, Zelner discussed the meeting “Decolonizing Healing,” held by the USC Women’s Student Assembly and Academic Culture Assembly on Monday. Zelner wrote that it was “highly concerning” that the two organizations receive funding from USG. He took issue with the event description that said “alternative methods of healing are just as valid, if not more valid, than pharmaceuticals,” calling it “misinformed.” He concluded by suggesting that USG funds be “redirected toward events in which students can learn where and how to receive both affordable and accessible health services.”The first response came from Shyann Murphy, executive co-director of WSA.“He wasn’t there at the event, so he has no idea what went on at the event,” Murphy said. “No one was saying, ‘Don’t go to a doctor.’ That wasn’t what we were advocating for.”Murphy said that the event did not criticize people for “going to the medical-industrial complex” but merely explored alternative medicine strategies alongside those of traditional medicine, as well as the issue of why healthcare is inaccessible to large portions of the population.Jacob Ellenhorn, commuter senator, said that though he agreed that being exposed to different forms of medicine was acceptable, the way USG-financed events are presented should be carefully examined.“I think that the issue the person is really addressing is that, while an event might be a certain way, when it’s marketed, it is marketed as something that it isn’t,” Ellenhorn said. “The event description … described an event that seems a lot different from the event that you actually held.”Ellenhorn suggested that for future event descriptions, hosts should avoid “loaded” or “controversial” language to make sure that USG doesn’t get perceived in “a certain way” by the student body. He pointed out two phrases in the description, “‘current methods’ include feeding into corporations that don’t really care about our well-being as persons …” and “… the medical-industrial complex is violent towards people,” as examples of such language. Murphy immediately responded.“I agree that it’s important to have accurate event descriptions, but again, I feel that our event description was very accurate,” Murphy said.Ellenhorn interjected, denying the accuracy of the description. Murphy asked Ellenhorn not to interrupt her.She added that it’s impossible to capture everything that will happen in an event in a description. She then asked Ellenhorn, “How many event descriptions have you written in your life? Do you know that an event doesn’t always go as the event description dictates?”Murphy also said that people should come to WSA’s events before voicing any criticism of the organization.Other USG members, among them Luis Vidalon-Suzuki, assistant director of the ACA, and Sabrina Enriquez, residential senator, also voiced their opinions on the issue. Vidalon-Suzuki emphasized that group directors should be accountable to their constituents above all, and that they were just trying to bring in “new perspectives” during the event. Enriquez also stressed the importance of avoiding tone-policing and attending events in order to formulate critiques.At the end of the discussion, Giuseppe Robalino, USG residential senator attempted to clarify the issue at hand.“It is clear that the event was going to be about the synthesis [of alternative and Western medicine]. This isn’t about tone policing, either, because there is no resolution being brought up that is directly prohibiting the use of certain language,” Robalino said. “This is a direct examination … of the USG programming fee, the budget and that being used in terms of … generating turnout.”Robalino said that Zelner, and constituents like him, did not feel welcome in WSA’s event because of the language in the event description. Robalino argued for “energizing the student body,” using USG funds efficiently, and ensuring that as few students as possible feel alienated from certain events.last_img read more

Read More →