Courtmonitored Drug Treatment Program Piloted in Kings County

first_imgNew sentencing options and treatment programs will soon be available in Kings County for people whose addictions lead to criminal behaviour. Government introduced the first court-monitored drug treatment program in Atlantic Canada today, April 23. The Kentville Law Courts will house the pilot project. “Keeping communities safe means trying to address whatever is causing people to get involved with criminal activity in the first place,” said Justice Minister Lena Diab. “People with drug addictions often turn to crime to maintain their habits. With treatment and support, many can turn their lives around, and that helps all of us in the long run.” The project is designed to ensure offenders take responsibility for their actions and commit to addiction treatment. People who have been charged with an offence can be referred to the program by their lawyer, the Crown attorney, police officers, probation officers and community treatment partners. They can also refer themselves. “A key role of the court is to impose sentences that contribute to a just, peaceful and safe society,” said Pamela Williams, Chief Judge of the Provincial and Family Courts of Nova Scotia. “During treatment, participants are held accountable to, and closely monitored by, the court. Sentences will try to deter the use of harmful substances that led to the crimes and to assist participants with rehabilitation.” To enter the program, participants must plead guilty to the offence and be in a treatment program before they return to court for sentencing. The court will monitor their progress. To graduate, participants must be drug-free for at least three months and be involved in their community. If they are charged with any new offences, they cannot complete the program. “We know that drug misuse, including abuse of prescription drugs, is a serious problem,” said Leo Glavine, Minister of Health and Wellness. “Today’s announcement is another positive step forward in our efforts to tackle this issue.” The pilot will be monitored to see if it helps prevent offenders from re-offending and reduces crime. The program began accepting referrals this month and court appearances should begin in May. The program is supported by the provincial and federal governments, the provincial court, Annapolis Valley Health, local police and community groups.last_img read more

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Quebec language office OKs use of some English words like hashtag grilledcheese

first_imgMONTREAL – English-language words such as hashtag, grilled-cheese, and parking are now acceptable in everyday French-language conversation in Quebec society, according to guidelines recently updated by the province’s language watchdog.The changes were implemented in January, but the revised dictionary by the Office quebecois de la langue francaise only became widely known recently.OQLF spokesman Jean-Pierre Le Blanc said Tuesday it’s the first time the watchdog’s guidelines have been changed since 2007.“We’re always reviewing words to see if they’re acceptable or not,” Le Blanc said in an interview. “I’m sure it’s several dozen (words) that have been anglicized.”Quebec’s language office is infamous across Canada for its strict application of the province’s language laws.Every few months a story makes headlines across the country of some language inspector fretting over English-language signage.The OQLF caused an international stir in 2013 when an inspector warned a popular restaurant in Montreal over its use of the Italian word, “pasta,” on menus, as opposed to the French word, “pates.”But the OQLF, through its website, also offers Quebecers linguistic tools and other resources on how best to use the French-language.The recent changes were made by a five-member linguistics committee composed of francophones who reviewed research done by the provincial agency.In some cases, using both the English or the French equivalent of words got the committee’s seal of approval.For example, the English word, “parking,” may now be used in French, as can its proper French-language equivalent, “stationnement.”Under the language bureau’s policy, words are reviewed based on a long list of detailed criteria, which include their general usage in Quebec.Le Blanc said words from other languages have also crept into daily French usage, such as cafe latte, gelato and trattoria.Benoit Melancon, professor of French literature at Universite de Montreal, said he understands why some Quebecers might be more worried about the use of English words — known as anglicisms — than people in France.“The French are more comfortable using anglicisms because their language isn’t threatened in any way,” he said in an interview. “But here, because of demographic reasons, we feel more threatened.“We’re surrounded by anglophones so it’s normal to think that we should protect French more than in other places from words coming from different places.”He noted that in France, they use the word “footing” instead of jogging.“Footing doesn’t exist in English, but it’s used as an English word,” Melancon said.Melancon gave the provincial language agency top marks for having a “realistic” policy which also encourages the use of French words.“It’s not worth going to war over “grilled-cheese” because it’s common usage,” he added.+++Some examples of English and French words that are both considered acceptable, according to the provincial language office:Cocktail or CoquetelParking or StationnementGrilled-cheese or Sandwich au fromage fondantHashtag or Mot-clicSource: Le grand dictionnaire terminologiquelast_img read more

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Pamela Anderson to Gordon Ramsay Drop the Foie Gras at Flagship Restaurant

first_imgIn the lead-up to World Vegan Month (November), PETA Honorary Director Pamela Anderson is calling on TV chef Gordon Ramsay to remove foie gras from the menu of his flagship establishment in London, Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, and replace it with faux gras for the month.“[F]oie gras is nothing more than a diseased liver produced in a real-life Hell’s Kitchen,” writes Anderson in her letter to Ramsay. “Given your exceptional talent, I have no doubt that you can create dishes to impress that don’t involve this cruelty.”To produce foie gras, ducks and geese are force-fed several times a day until their livers become diseased and swell to up to 10 times their normal size. PETA U.K. — whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to eat or abuse in any other way” — has released exposés of foie gras farms that revealed that birds used for the cruelly obtained food were sick, dying, and dead and that some had holes in their necks from being impaled by the feeding pipes. Foie gras production is so inhumane that it’s illegal in the U.K. and more than a dozen other countries.last_img read more

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Atleo preaches jobs education in Regina

first_imgAPTN National NewsAssembly of First Nation National Chief Shawn Atleo was in Regina this week speaking to youth about their education and career opportunities.The career fair brought in over 200 high school students.As APTN National News reporter Delaney Windigo tells us, they’re all hoping for a bright future and looking for ways to reach their dreams.last_img

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Mikmaw chiefs optimistic proposed changes to onreserve welfare will be dropped

first_imgTrina RoacheAPTN National NewsEskasoni Chief Leroy Denny says while the news is unofficial he is expecting an announcement from the Liberals at the Assembly of First Nations meetings this week in Ottawa that the federal government will drop proposed changes to welfare on-reserve.Denny said he can’t comment other than what he put on Facebook. On Friday he posted, “Tonight we got news from a government source that the social changes will be delayed indefinitely. We are waiting for more details and an official announcement.”Denny said he won’t celebrate until the news “comes from the minister.”Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett will meet with the Mi’kmaw chiefs on Thursday at the AFN meetings in Gatineau, QC. Though word may come sooner in the week. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is scheduled to address the AFN on Tuesday.The Mi’kmaq fought a four-year legal battle against the former Conservative government over its decision to mirror provincial welfare policies on reserve.The Liberals’ change of heart comes after news of a policy document that supported the Mi’kmaw position was found recently in the National Archives.Mi’kmag Lawyer Naiomi Metallic said the 1964 document outlines “that it’s not going to be possible to adopt all aspects of provincial policy and it goes on to say we need to adapt it to our circumstances. And that’s really key. It proves we were right. We were right along.”Though the chiefs won at the lower level court, they lost at the Federal Court of Appeal in January of 2015. It agreed Ottawa was only following policy. In October, the Supreme Court of Canada said it wouldn’t hear the case.The Mi’kmaq were out of legal options and hoped to lobby the new Liberal government.Millbrook Chief Bob Gloade also posted on Facebook, “Once the official announcement comes from the Minister things will look promising. Lots of hard work done by our legal team and lobbying government officials over the last several weeks is beginning to pay off as liberal government is showing a willingness to work together.”The Mi’kmaq have argued all along that the welfare changes on reserve would cause hardship because bands would get 30 per cent less funding for social assistance.But welfare works differently on-reserve, they argued. Block funding is used to pay for programs and actuals, like social housing, rent and utilities. Court documents showed that government was aware there would be negative impacts on housing and a risk that more kids would end up taken into care.Though the policy document has given the chiefs new hope, Denny was frustrated that Ottawa didn’t include it in the court documents submitted in the first place.“We can’t understand why it wasn’t produced,” said Denny when the chiefs first found out about the document. “It’s very discouraging because we put a lot of time and money into fighting this in court. We just want to be treated fairly. We were right all this time.”As word spreads on social media, there’s a sense of relief among the Mi’kmaq.Denny looks forward to meeting with Bennett. He’s optimistic and said, “The new government seems open minded.”No one from Indigenous Affairs could be reached for comment.troache@aptn.calast_img read more

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UN food agency anxious over possible violent reprisals in southern Sudan

The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today expressed fears of a wave of deadly retaliatory attacks on the heels of the massacre of more than 100 people in southern Sudan earlier over the weekend. “WFP and its partners have called on the Government to put an end to inter-tribal fighting, which is endangering the delivery of humanitarian aid,” UN spokesperson Marie Okabe told reporters. Yesterday, the Security Council condemned the “grave attacks” in Akobo in Jonglei state that killed at least 185 people, including over 100 women and children. At least 60 people from the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) were also reported dead as a result of the attacks, which took place on Sunday. Ambassador John Sawers of the United Kingdom, which holds the rotating Council presidency this month, said the attacks were especially concerning given that they seemed to target women and children and involved the use of sophisticated weaponry. In a statement issued earlier this week, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon expressed his concern at the latest “heinous” surge in violence in southern Sudan, the scene of one of Africa’s longest and bloodiest civil wars. At least 2 million people were killed, 4 million others uprooted and 600,000 more fled across the borders until a peace agreement in 2005 ended the 20 years of fighting between southern separatists and the national Government in the north. A referendum on independence for the south is expected to be held in 2011, following national elections next year. More recently, violence has flared periodically from various quarters, with some 700 people have been killed since March in the region while another 19,000 have been uprooted, Ms. Okabe said today. The Secretary-General warned last month that escalating inter-tribal fighting was jeopardizing the stability of the entire country and putting at risk key milestones in implementing the 2005 pact, known as the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA). Attacks by the notorious Ugandan rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), have also wrought havoc in border regions in the south. 7 August 2009The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today expressed fears of a wave of deadly retaliatory attacks on the heels of the massacre of more than 100 people in southern Sudan earlier over the weekend. read more

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AsiaPacific region at UN forum calls for better protection of migrants

Migrant workers are development actors and contribute to development by way of remittances, skills, culture and labour to States of origin, transit and destination, said a statement issued at the end of a three-day meeting in Bangkok of representatives from 31 governments in the region.The Asia-Pacific Regional Preparatory Meeting for the Global Forum on Migration and Development 2010 was organized by the UN Asia-Pacific Regional Thematic Working Group on International Migration including Human Trafficking, which is co-chaired by the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM), with participation from other UN agencies and UN-affiliated organizations. About one in four of the world’s estimated 214 million migrants live in the Asia-Pacific region, which receives about 42 per cent of global remittances. ESCAP noted that international migration is increasingly being recognized as a powerful force for development as migrants contribute to the social, cultural and economic development of both countries of origin and destination.The meeting recommended that national laws be reviewed to ensure that all migrants, including domestic workers, women and children have access to legal protection, birth registration, and health and education services in both countries of origin and destination. “As we continue our work at the national, regional and international levels, let us not forget that migrants are human beings, not mere export commodities, sources of remittances or agents of development,” Working Group Co-Chairs Nanda Krairiksh and Andrew Bruce said in a joint closing statement.“Besides their important role in a country’s economy, it is imperative that migrants and their families receive the support and attention they require given their vulnerable status, in both countries of origin and destination.”Delivering a keynote statement, Ton-Nu-Thi Ninh, Former Vice-Chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee of Viet Nam’s National Assembly, stressed that the most vulnerable groups are irregular and undocumented migrants, who account for one quarter of migrant workers in or from Asia and are often victims of human trafficking.The meeting’s Bangkok Statement will be presented as Asia-Pacific’s contribution to the Global Forum on Migration and Development to be held in November in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. 24 September 2010A United Nations meeting of Asia-Pacific countries today called for better legal protection of migrants, especially the millions who are undocumented migrants and often victims of human trafficking. read more

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UN experts reiterate that torture took place at US detention centre at

The five, who serve in an unpaid, personal capacity, were speaking at a news conference in Geneva after presenting the new, enhanced UN Human Rights Council with a previously published joint report in which they called for the closure of the centre at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.The interrogation methods of prisoners authorized by US Secretary of Defence Donald Rumsfeld constituted torture and the US administration was wrong to say there were no cases of torture committed at Guantánamo, the Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, Manfred Nowak, told reporters.Asked about US allegations over the report’s credibility since it was based on second-hand information, Mr. Nowak said this was not the case and the information gathered was based on first-hand information. Though they did not visit the centre, the rapporteurs interviewed former detainees, lawyers acting on behalf of detainees and US Government officials as well as consulting public records.The Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health, Paul Hunt, said the prisoners’ mental health was worsening given the duration of their detention and lack of due process. Evidence collected indicated that there were over 350 acts of self-harm committed in 2003 alone.The US authorities disputed this by suggesting mental duress was common in all correctional facilities but Mr. Hunt said that according to testimony from health experts Guantanamo had witnessed far more cases of mental duress of prisoners.The Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief, Asma Jahangir, said there was evidence of “religious humiliation” and that the international community had a long-term responsibility to remedy the harm caused by this.Concerning follow up action, Mr. Nowak said most governments had agreed with the report and it was now hoped that those States would persuade Washington to abide by its recommendations and close down Guantánamo, and for the rapporteurs to be able to visit other such facilities.US President George W. Bush’s admission that there had been secret prisons came as no surprise, Mr. Nowak said. There had been 100 per cent proof that they existed. The transfer of 14 people from these secret prisons to Guantánamo was a positive sign in that they could now be visited by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Asked whether they had information on other secret prisons, Mr. Nowak said there was no conclusive evidence although there were lists of persons who had definitely been ‘disappeared,’ but whose whereabouts were unknown. They were either dead or in one of these secret prisons, he added.The rapporteurs stressed that their primary concern was to have Guantánamo detention facility closed down, to meet with the 14 individuals recently transferred there from secret prisons, and to be able to investigate those secret prisons.The other two members of the team were: Chairman Rapporteur of the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, Leila Zerrougui, and Special Rapporteur on the independence of judges and lawyers, Leandro Despouy. read more

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Mediterranean Games W Serbia wins Gold

Serbian girls won the gold at the Mediterranean Games in Mersin. In the final they were better than the national team of Slovenia in a low-scoring game, winning 25:19 (13:12). The bronze medal went to Croatia, which beat Montenegro by one goal 25:24 (12:11).In the mens competition, Egypt and Croatia will be playing in the final in a match which is scheduled for tomorrow. ← Previous Story Mladen Rakcevic to continue career in AEK Athens? Next Story → Claudine Mendy pregnant – does not come to ZRK Vardar? read more

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Palliative care education sessions available

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Parliamentary secretary for volunteers and carers, MP Gabrielle Williams has launched free community education sessions to help inform the Greek community about the benefits of palliative care and how to access the services.“We want the Greek community to know that palliative care is not just for the very end of life but can benefit people at different stages of their illness,” said the chair of Palliative Care Victoria Michael Bramwell.“You and your families have choice and we encourage you to tell us what your wishes are so we can best meet your needs,” he said.Hosted by the Australian Greek Welfare Society (AGWS) as part of the Culturally Responsive Palliative Care Project, the service is aimed at educating families and carers on how to provide the best care and improve the quality of life for their loved ones living with a life-limiting illness such as heart disease, motor neurone disease and advanced dementia.Furthermore, the project has highlighted the importance of providing more inclusive and culturally responsive services, so that people feel confident that their cultural needs are being respected. To assist the project team in tailoring their sessions to the Greek Australian community and develop their bilingual course materials, the AGWS has played an integral role in providing advice and an insight into the needs and cultural practices of the community. Jointly led with the Ethnic Communities’ Council of Victoria, chairperson Eddie Micallef said: “This project raises awareness that palliative care is available to Greek people; that most options are free of charge and that services can be accessed to support families taking care of loved ones.”Community groups who are interested in learning about palliative care can register for a session by contacting EECV on (03) 9349 4122.last_img read more

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Des air bag pour restaurer une pyramide égyptienne

first_imgDes air bag pour restaurer une pyramide égyptienneUne entreprise d’ingénierie britannique vient de terminer la première phase de la mission qui lui a été confiée : assurer la pérennité d’une pyramide égyptienne vieille de 4.700 ans, menacée d’effondrement.       Cintec, une société d’ingénierie de Newport (Pays de Galles), forte des solutions qu’elle a déjà apportées à des problèmes structurels sur des monuments tels que la Maison Blanche ou le château de Windsor, utilise résolument les technologies du XIXe siècle. Sa mission actuelle : préserver l’un des plus imposants monuments de l’Égypte antique, la pyramide de Djoser, sur le site de Saqqara, datant de 2.700 av J.-C., qui risque l’effondrement après un tremblement de terre survenu en 1992.La première phase des travaux a consisté à utiliser des sacs remplis d’air sous pression pour soutenir le toit de la pyramide de 60 mètres de haut, préalablement aux réparations plus durables qui devront être effectuées. La technologie mise en œuvre est pour le moins originale : il s’agit d’entourer un explosif avec un sac suffisamment solide pour résister à l’explosion, laquelle fait gonfler cette enveloppe avec un contrôle si précis de la pression que le sac ne fait ‘qu’effleurer’ la surface du bâtiment, sans ajouter de forces encore plus grandes sur les matériaux déjà instables et fragilisés.Le 13 juin 2011 à 11:17 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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State reports fewer trapped gypsy moths

first_imgAfter setting 34,000 traps around the state this summer to catch the much-loathed European and Asian gypsy moths, the Washington State Department of Agriculture has reportedly caught 25 of the voracious bugs, down from the 42 caught in 2015.One European gypsy moth of the 25 trapped this summer was found in Hockinson. None of the moths found were caught in areas that were sprayed for gypsy moths earlier this year. Statewide, no Asian gypsy moths were found, after last year’s record catch of 10.“It’s a big relief, no Asian moths were caught,” said Karla Salp, community outreach and environmental education specialist with WSDA.However, department officials said two to three years of trapping after a spray treatment are required before WSDA determines the success of a treatment.“While it is too early to declare the spring treatments a success, this year’s trapping results are very encouraging,” Jim Marra, WSDA’s Pest Program Manager and leader of the gypsy moth program, said in a news release.Vancouver had a high concentration of the traps this summer because one Asian gypsy moth — the more problematic of the two — was found at the Port of Vancouver in 2015.last_img read more

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Moussa Sissoko sidelined for two weeks

first_imgTottenham midfielder Moussa Sissoko sustained a groin injury in last weekend 1-0 defeat to Manchester United and has been ruled out for two weeks.Sissoko went down clutching his groin at Wembley last Sunday and was subbed in the 43rd minute for Erik Lamela.He was initially thought to be out for a month but is now set to return the first week of February and could feature in Spurs’ last 16 Champions League clash with Borussia Dortmund.Spurs could be without midfielders Eric Dier and Victor Wanyama who are currently recovering from appendicitis  and knee injury respectively and doubtful for their trip to Fulham on Sunday, but Mauricio Pochettino remains positive.Christian Eriksen, Tottenham, SpursPochettino: ‘Happy’ Christian Eriksen ready for Spurs action Andrew Smyth – September 12, 2019 Mauricio Pochettino insists Christian Eriksen is “happy” and in the right frame of mind for Tottenham despite his failed summer exit.“Like in life, in football, there is two options: to cry or to see a possibility for another player to play and step up and an opportunity to play in a different way,” he told Sky Sports.“I think it’s a massive challenge. Rather than sitting in my chair and crying, I’d rather find another way to challenge ourselves and to be consistent, keeping the same level as before.”last_img read more

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Industrial worker fatality injured in Spring Valley

first_img October 3, 2018 Posted: October 3, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter A worker was fatally injured Wednesday when an iron beam fell off a truck and struck him at an East County metal-fabrication yard.The industrial accident at West Coast Iron in the 9300 block of Jamacha Road in Spring Valley was reported shortly before 10:30 a.m., according to the state Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or Cal/OSHA.The victim’s name was withheld pending notification of his family.Cal/OSHA will investigate the fatality, a process that can take up to six months, to determine if any workplace violations contributed to the accident, agency spokeswoman Jeanne-Mairie Duval said. KUSI Newsroom Industrial worker fatality injured in Spring Valleylast_img read more

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Neighbors pay respects to hitandrun victim

first_imgSteven Lane/The ColumbianA photograph of Maria Delos-Carrasco Angulo, is shown at a memorial vigil Friday night outside Becerra’s Plaza in Vancouver. Angulo died Thursday after a car struck her as she walked in a crosswalk on Fourth Plain Boulevard. Seconds after Cory Jones lit the flame on a neighbor’s candle, a persistent, chilly breeze blew it out.Maria Delos-Carrasco Angulo probably would not have known any of the three dozen people struggling to light candles in her memory Friday night. Yet, that scarcely mattered to Jones, 29, as he stood near a makeshift shrine of a stuffed dog and giraffe, yellow and red roses and a single cherubic picture of the hit-and-run victim in front of Becerra’s Plaza.“It’s the point that we’re showing support for somebody who shouldn’t be gone,” said Jones, who had seen Angulo around but did not know her.Angulo, a 25-year-old hair salon employee, died around 7:20 p.m. Thursday shortly after a Honda hatchback car struck her as she walked in a crosswalk on Fourth Plain Boulevard between Neals and Rossiter lanes. Her body came to rest near Becerra’s Plaza, an estimated 125 feet from the point where the car made impact with her.Prosecutors charged James I. Collins, 37, of Vancouver, on suspicion of felony hit-and-run and vehicular homicide. Clark County Superior Court Judge John Wulle set Collins’ bail at $75,000, noting he had little information about the case’s evidence. Collins waived “probable cause,” meaning that officers did not have to submit a report to the judge outlining the arrest’s basis.Familiar taleThat such an incident would happen on Fourth Plain Boulevard did not surprise 17-year-old Gabriela Valencia or others at the vigil. They recalled their own near misses and experiences witnessing others who were less fortunate. Angulo’s death provides vivid proof that the city needs to place a red light between Neals and Rossiter lanes, they said.last_img read more

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Craig Billings joins Wynn Macau board

first_img Wynn Resorts to undergo internal restructure as part of refinancing plan Dealer dilemma Wynn Resorts CFO and Treasurer Craig Billings has been appointed as a new non-executive director of Wynn Macau.Billings, who joined the company in April 2017, replaces Kim Sinatra on the board after the former Wynn Resorts Executive VP, General Counsel and Secretary stepped down in July. The 45-year-old, whose previous gaming industry experience includes roles at Aristocrat and IGT, will serve for a period of three years and be paid an annual fee of HK$100,000. RelatedPosts Wynn Resorts shares favored over Wynn Macau: analysts The news formed part of Wynn Macau’s interim results announcement for the six months to 30 June 2018, released on Friday, which saw casino revenues jump 20.2% to HK$16.5 billion and total revenue climb 21.0% to HK$19.2 billion. Adjusted EBITDA increased 36.9% to HK$5.3 billion while profit almost doubled to HK$3.0 billion.Wynn Macau also declared a total dividend of HK$0.75 per share on Friday, to be paid to shareholders on 24 September 2018. The dividend includes an interim dividend of HK$0.32 per share for the six months ended 30 June 2018 and a special dividend of HK$0.43 per share. Load Morelast_img read more

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Police searching for driver of silver minivan involved in fatal Sunrise hitandrun

first_imgSUNRISE, FLA. (WSVN) – Police said they are looking for the driver of a minivan after a fatal hit-and-run in Sunrise.Sunrise Police said the minivan struck and killed a man near Northwest 90th Terrace and North Pine Island Road, Thursday.The driver kept going and left the victim lying in the street, investigators said.Police said they are looking for a 2005 to 2007 silver Honda Odyssey.If you have any information on this fatal hit-and-run, call Broward County Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $3,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Murder accused killed in alleged gunfight with cops

first_imgProthom Alo IllustrationA man was killed in an alleged gunfight with police in Daspara of Bera upazila in Pabna district on Saturday night.Deceased Nizam Mandal, 42, from Mirpur village of the upazila, was a member of an extremist group, Sarbahara, police claimed.The law enforcement said he was an accused in nine cases, including that of the murder of three police members in Dhalarchar union in 2010. Acting on information that a gang of robbers taking preparation for committing robbery in Daspara village, police conducted a raid in the area around 11:30pm, Aminpur police station officer-in-charge Abu Obayed told Prothom Alo.Sensing the presence of the law enforcement, the robbers opened gunfire on police, prompting them to shoot back, triggering the gunfight, he added.The robbers fled the scene after 12-15 minutes of gunfight, the OC said.Later, police recovered the bullet-injured person and sent him to Bera upazila health complex where physicians declared him dead around 1:00am, Abu Obayed said.A locally-made pistol, two rounds of bullet, and three machetes were seized from the scene, he said.Three policemen were also injured in the gunfight, OC Abu Obayed claimed.”The law enforcement’s version of these events was, however, not verified independently as no version of the incident was available immediately either from any witnesses or from any members of the victim’s family.”last_img read more

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Israel facing different kind of conflict after 70 years

first_imgWounded demonstrator is evacuated during a protest where Palestinians demand the right to return to their homeland, at the Israel-Gaza border, east of Gaza City. ReutersIsrael has built a high-tech economy, forged the region’s strongest military and fended off enemies surrounding it in the 70 years since its creation, but many think it faces a new threat: itself.The 70th anniversary of the establishment of the state of Israel on 14 May comes with the country in a tug-of-war between those who want it modelled more on Jewish religious values and others who say that will put its future as a democracy at risk.“Israelis are bound by fate. When our very existence is challenged, we’re together,” said Yedidia Stern, a law professor at Bar Ilan University and vice president of the Israel Democracy Institute think tank.But once things are secure, “we become free to fight over our destination”.Legislation from prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s right-wing government seeking to fortify Israel’s Jewish identity has raised alarm among prominent voices in society.The measures could be seen as part of attempts at self-definition by a young nation built in the biblical-era Jewish homeland in the wake of the Holocaust, some experts say.Those promoting them say part of their aim is to give a voice to those outside the traditional elite.But others see many recent moves as populist politics that will result in a less democratic society and, when it comes to the Palestinians, “apartheid”.Israel has fought repeated wars since its creation, but is not currently engaged in a major armed conflict.The conflict with the Palestinians is ever-present, but has simmered at mostly low heat since the end of the 2014 Gaza war.That has afforded Israelis the space of mind to delve into other issues, experts say.‘All its eulogisers’The soul-searching in Netanyahu’s government has manifested in a draft law defining Israel as the nation state of the Jewish people, designating Hebrew as the language and anchoring “unified Jerusalem” as the capital.It recently passed a preliminary parliamentary reading.On Sunday, a ministerial committee advanced another bill limiting the ability of the Supreme Court to strike down laws it perceives as contravening democratic values.Ministers supporting the legislation say the court has accumulated too much power in the balance between the parliament and judiciary.Rulings that have angered them include those ordering rogue settlements in the occupied West Bank to be evacuated and the suspension of a plan to expel African migrants.Separately, the culture ministry has in recent years sought the authority to withhold funding from institutions perceived as disloyal to Israel.Members of the opposition, artists, academics and some former officials have criticised what they see as a trend of legislation harmful to Israel’s democracy-though ministers say their claims are overblown.“Israeli democracy is alive, breathing and kicking, and it is stronger than all its critics and all its eulogisers,” justice minister Ayelet Shaked, of the religious nationalist Jewish Home party, has said.‘Not yet a home’An early landmark in the debate over Israel’s Jewish nature occurred in 1947, before the state was even created.That was when the secular Zionist leadership and ultra-Orthodox Jewish representatives agreed to maintain a status quo on matters related to religion and state.It granted the ultra-Orthodox-strictly religious Jews-power over personal law such as marriage and instituted respect for the Sabbath, or weekly day of rest.The agreement remained when Israel published its declaration of independence on 14 May, 1948 reflecting the aspiration to embrace democratic values while stressing the newborn nation’s Jewish nature.Israel does not have a formal constitution, but does have a de facto one, called its “basic laws”.In 1992, parliament passed two basic laws enshrining Israel’s values as “Jewish and democratic” and necessitating any legislation to conform to those terms.“Increasing numbers of Israelis feel a need to choose between the ‘Jewish’ and the ‘democratic’, and feel that the manner in which these values are implemented in Israeli society is not sufficiently balanced,” said Stern, whose think tank’s surveys on the subject have demonstrated the trend.For around the first 40 years of Israel’s history, secular Jews of European origin with social democratic values dominated, he said.But since then, other groups such as Jews who originated from Arab countries, religious nationalists and the ultra-Orthodox have asserted themselves and emerged as potent political forces.Arab Israelis, who make up some 17.5 per cent of the population and largely sympathise with the Palestinians, have also become more politically active.Looming over the debate is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.An increasing number of Israeli right-wing politicians openly oppose a two-state solution and talk of wanting to annex most of the West Bank.There are warnings that will lead to “apartheid” since, under those scenarios, Palestinians would presumably not be granted equal rights.One of Israel’s leading authors, David Grossman, argued in a recent speech that an “apartheid reality” had already been created through the occupation.“Israel was established so that the Jewish people, who have nearly never felt at home in the world, would finally have a home,” Grossman said.“And now, 70 years later, strong Israel may be a fortress, but it is not yet a home.”last_img read more

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first_img Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Women’s Health View all 62 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:56Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Molecular Imaging View all 22 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: Collaboration as a Catalyst for AI InnovationFujifilm Collaborates With Lunit on AI Pilot ProjectRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Sponsored Content | Videos | Information Technology | February 07, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” Fujifilm on Providing Imaging Solutions for the Entire Continuum of Care Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  In this video Johann Fernando, Ph.D., Chief Operating Officer of FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. discusses his vision for Fujifilm as an end-to-end imaging partner — offering high quality solutions for diagnostic imaging, treatment planning, treatment follow-up, and enterprise imaging management. He also shares his point-of-view on developing patient-centric solutions catering to the unique needs for specialized patient populations including solutions for pediatrics and imaging solutions dedicated to the operating room.  Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Conference Coverage View all 396 items Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Recent Videos View all 606 items Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more SCCT news and videos RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

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